Scott Hanselman

Easy accelerated 3D Games in a browser with JavaScript and WebGL using Three.js or Babylon.js

June 11, '14 Comments [12] Posted in Gaming | Javascript | Open Source
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Let's ignore that we haven't got a web-agreed-upon way to do just about anything, much less basic line-of-business apps with data-bound text boxes over data, and just revel in the fact that we can do hardware-accelerated 3D graphics in our browsers with WebGL. This works today in all the latest browsers.

I noticed this fantastic mini-game promoting Assassin's Creed over at http://race.assassinscreedpirates.com that uses WebGL via a library called Babylon.js. On my Windows machine it runs perfectly in IE11, Chrome 37, or Firefox 30. (Yes, in retrospec, the version numbering for browsers is getting out of hand.)

Some folks on Macs have reported issues with WebGL. Check out https://www.browserleaks.com/webgl for YOUR browser's capabilities.

This Pirate Ship game is really worth checking out and it's fun for the kids. You can also check out the Developer Teardown and learn how they built it.

3D Assassin's Creed Pirates in my browser

I wanted to get a better understanding of exactly how difficult it is (or easy!) to get in to WebGL in the browser. I found this article over at SitePoint by Joe Hewitson and started with some of his sample code where he compares two popular WebGL libraryes, three.js and babylon.js. The Assassin's Creed game here is written using Babylon.js.

Three.js seem to be  a general layer on top of WebJS, aiming to make scene creation and animation easy. Using Joe's sample (that I changed a little) along with a texture.gif, I was able to make this spinning 3D cube easily.

There's a live example running at http://hanselstorage.blob.core.windows.net/blog/WebGL.html you can see in your modern browser. Below is just a static image.

I would have animated it but that would have been a meg. ;)

Three.js is on the left and Babylon.js is on the right. It doesn't really matter given the static image, but one think you'll notice immediately if you run the live sample is that you can zoom in and out, pan, grab, and manipulate the babylon.js cube. I could have hooked up some events to the three.js cube, or perhaps added a physics engine like Physijs and made it interact with the world, I suppose. It struck me though, that this little example shows the difference in philosophy between the two. Babylon seems to be more of a game engine or a library that wants to help you make games so there's interactions, collision detection, and lighting included.

Three.js supports many renderers, cameras, and lighting. You can use all WebGL capabilities such as lens flares. It supports all the usual objects and geometries as well. Their examples are extensive with over 150 coding examples covering everything you'd want to know from fonts, models, textures, to sounds. There's even an in-browser Three.js editor.

Babylon includes a lot including a physics engine from cannon.js built in, full scene graph, offline mode, textures, special effects and post processes, many cameras including Oculus Rift (!) lots of meshes. Babylon.js even supports standard Gamepads via like the Xbox One controller natively via the Gamepad API spec.

Anyway, here is the cube on the right from Joe's code that I modified slightly, using babylon.js:

// Babylon.js 
var canvas = document.getElementById('babylonCanvas');
var engine = new BABYLON.Engine(canvas, true);
var sceneB = new BABYLON.Scene(engine);
var camera = new BABYLON.ArcRotateCamera("camera", 1, 0.8, 10, new BABYLON.Vector3(0, 0, 0), sceneB);

var light = new BABYLON.DirectionalLight("light", new BABYLON.Vector3(0, -1, 0), sceneB);
//light.diffuse = new BABYLON.Color3(1, 0, 0);
//light.specular = new BABYLON.Color3(1, 1, 1);

var box = BABYLON.Mesh.CreateBox("box", 3.0, sceneB);
var material = new BABYLON.StandardMaterial("texture", sceneB);
box.material = material;
material.diffuseTexture = new BABYLON.Texture("texture.gif", sceneB);

sceneB.activeCamera.attachControl(canvas);

engine.runRenderLoop(function () {
box.rotation.x += 0.005;
box.rotation.y += 0.01;
sceneB.render();
});

I also commented out the lighting but you can see how easy it is to add lighting to a scene if you like. In this case there was a diffuse red light along with a specular white.

With babylon.js I could change the size of the scene by changing the size of the canvas. With three.js the width and height are pulled in programmatically from the enclosing div.


Here is the near-same box created with three.js.

// Three.js 
var div = document.getElementById('three');
var height = div.offsetHeight;
var width = div.offsetWidth;

var renderer = new THREE.WebGLRenderer();
renderer.setSize(width, height);
div.appendChild(renderer.domElement);

var camera = new THREE.PerspectiveCamera(70, width / height, 1, 1000);
camera.position.z = 400;

var sceneT = new THREE.Scene();

var cube = new THREE.CubeGeometry(200, 200, 200);

var texture = THREE.ImageUtils.loadTexture('texture.gif');
texture.anisotropy = renderer.getMaxAnisotropy();

var material = new THREE.MeshBasicMaterial({ map: texture });

var mesh = new THREE.Mesh(cube, material);
sceneT.add(mesh);

animate();

function animate() {
requestAnimationFrame(animate);

mesh.rotation.x += 0.005;
mesh.rotation.y += 0.01;
renderer.render(sceneT, camera);
}

Both libraries have amazing Examples Galleries and you should check them out.

Also note that there's a contest running until June 20th, 2014 over at http://www.modern.ie/en-us/demos/assassinscreedpirates where you'll create your own shader within the browser and submit it for judging. Contestants must be over 16 years of age and from one of the following countries: United States of America, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Spain, or Australia. The contest starts here and the grand prize is an Assassin’s Creed Collector’s Black Chest Edition and an Xbox One.

Create your Shaders in the browser

Even if you don't win, do check out the in-browser shader editor. It's amazing.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to use an Xbox One controller on your Windows PC

June 9, '14 Comments [18] Posted in Gaming
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B00CMQTUSS_XboxOne_Controller_F_TransBG_RGB_2013The Xbox One controller is fantastic. Even if you don't have an Xbox One, the controller now works on a Windows PC with a standard micro-USB cable. Any Steam and Windows game that supports standard XInput works great. I've played Tomb Raider and Bioshock Infinite and both worked wonderfully. Everything works smoothly and even vibration feedback is supported.

I've previously used the Xbox 360 Controller's "Wireless Receiver Adapter" for Windows to pair XBox 360 controllers. It also works great, but I frankly prefer a plug-in and remove model, rather than having another adapter.

Soon the drivers for the Xbox One controller will be available on Windows Update. That means you'll be able to just plugin the Xbox One controller into any PC and the drivers will just download.

Until then, you'll want to install one these drivers depending on your machine:

Once these drivers are installed, plugin the Xbox One Controller to any USB port. There's a micro-USB port on the top of the Xbox One so you can use a regular USB cable. I used the one from my Kindle because it's very long.

The controller shows up as a Gamepad in Windows and works with any game that supports a standard joystick. Here's  a screenshot from my PC:

image

Here's an animated gif of me moving the controller and seeing the result in the Properties Dialog. You can see it's got all 10 buttons, 3 axes and the POV hat.

If you've got a Xbox One controller, you should grab a micro-USB cable and get this set up today. If you're considering a new PC controller, I recommend this controller even if you don't have an Xbox One.

Related Links


Sponsor: A big welcome to my friends at Octopus Deploy. They are sponsoring the blog feed this week. Using NuGet and powerful conventions, Octopus Deploy makes it easy to automate releases of ASP.NET applications and Windows Services. Say goodbye to remote desktop and start automating today!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Guide to Freeing up Disk Space under Windows 8.1

June 9, '14 Comments [32] Posted in
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This is an "updated for Windows 8.1" version of my popular original article Guide to Freeing up Disk Space under Windows 7.

I've got a 256 gig C: drive that is an SSD, but things add up and I've noticed that in the last week or so I've only got about 20 gigs free and it was feeling cramped. A few hours later, I have 80G free. Here's how.

Warranty: There is none. Please read carefully and with all things you find on a random blog, be careful because you have no one to blame but yourself. However, if you take a few minutes, read carefully and do even a few of these tips or just run Disk Cleanup, you'll get lots of space back.

  • Press Windows Key + W and type "Free up." You'll see a few options. We're going to run two things.
    • First "Free up disk space on this PC" which runs full screen as a "modern app."
    • From here you can see how much space your Windows Store apps take up, as well as pictures, Videos, etc. You can also empty your recycle bin from here. It'll also give you a decent idea of how your personal files take up space.
      image
    • If you click "See my app sizes" you'll go to this screen where you can quickly uninstall apps. I don't bother with anything under 100 megs.
      image
  • Now, run "Free up disk space by deleting unnecessary files" which is the Disk Cleanup desktop app.
    • This app is your main line of defense and lists all kinds of things it can clean up. Be sure to click the "Clean up system files" option to run Disk Cleanup as Administrator. This will allow it to find and identify a lot more files for cleanup.
    • image
    • When you run Disk Cleanup as admin, as I have below, it is able to cleanup after Windows Update files. Note the difference between the screenshot above (run normally) and the one below (after clicking "Cleanup System files." It's found 238 megs of files from Windows Update that aren't needed. You may find lots more.
      image
  • Set your Windows Store Mail app to only download a month of mail. See how mail above uses 514 megs of space? That's because I told it to download all my mail. From within the Windows 8.1 mail application, press Ctrl-C, then click Settings, then go to Accounts and under Options for your account change the "Download Email from..." option to the last month, or even less.
  • Disable Hibernate - I have a desktop, and I prefer just three power states, sleeping, on or off. I don't use Hibernate. Plus, I have 12 gigs of RAM, and hibernation uses as much disk space as you have RAM. From an administrative command prompt, type "powercfg -h off" to get that space back. Got me back 12 gigs. It's up to you. Don't turn it off if you use the feature.
  • Virtual Memory - If you've got 8 or more gigs of RAM, it's likely that Windows has allocated more Virtual Memory as a file on disk than needed. It's not bad, and it's not a bug, it's just conservative. For example, I have 12 gigs of RAM and Windows has allocated a 12 gig "swap file." Interestingly, it's recommending (not sure if that's to me, or to itself) that I have only 5 gigs. Boom, change it manually and I get 7 gigs free. Not a big deal with a 500 gig drive, but a HUGE deal on a 128 gig SSD.
    Type Windows Key+W, then "Advanced System Settings" and enter. From here, go to Performance Settings, then Advanced. Under Virtual Memory, click Change. This is usually managed for you. Change it only if you feel you know what you're doing. Here I've moved it to my D: drive, opening up space for my smaller C: drive.
    image
  • %TEMP% Files - Even though Disk Cleanup is great, sometimes for whatever reason it doesn't always get stuff out of the TEMP folder. I recommend you try to delete the TEMP folder. I do this from the command line. Open up an administrative console, type "cd /d %TEMP%" (without the quotes, of course). Then, go up one folder with "cd .." and type "rd /s temp"
    Do be warned, this command says to TRY to delete the whole folder and everything underneath it. It's very unambiguous. If you don't feel comfortable, don't do it. If you feel in over your head, don't do it. If it screws up your computer, don't email me. Next, I do a "dir temp" to see if the folder really got deleted. It usually doesn't because almost always some other program has a temp file open and the command can't get remove everything. If it DOES remove the folder, just "md temp" to get it back fresh and empty. This got me back 12 gigs. I'm sure you'll be surprised and get lots back.
  • imageDelete your Browser Cache - Whether you use Chrome, IE or Firefox, your browser is saving probably a gig or more of temporary files. Consider clearing it out manually (or use the CCleaner mentioned below) occasionally or move the cache from your browser's settings to another drive with more space.
  • Clean up System Restore - Windows keeps backups of lots of system files every time something major (driver installation, some software installations, etc) happens, and after a while this can take up lots of space. It uses a service/subsystem called ShadowCopies and can be administered with a tool called vssadmin.
    Now, the EASIEST way to handle this is just to run Disk Cleanup, then click More Options and "Clean up…" which will delete all but the most recent System Restore data. That's what I did. That got me back lots of space back on my C: drive.
    You can also go to System Properties, then System Protection, then Configure and not only control how much space to allow for System Protection but also delete preview restore points as seen in the screenshot at left.
    Alternatively, you can use the vssadmin tool from an admin command prompt to to do important things. One, you can set a max size for the System Restore to get. Two, you can set an alternative drive. For example, you could have the D: drive be responsible for System Restore for the C: drive.
    You can use the commands like this. Note that you can put whatever drive letters you have in there. I ran it for each of my three drives. Note that this isn't just used for System Restore, it's also used for the "Previous Versions" feature of Windows that keeps some number of Shadow Backups in case you delete something and didn't mean it. Kind of a mini, local time machine. Point is, this isn't a feature you probably want off, just one you want kept to a max.
    Here's the command line I used. Your mileage may vary.
    vssadmin Resize ShadowStorage /On=C: /For=C: /MaxSize=15GB
  • SpaceSniffer 1.1.0.0 - www.uderzo.it Understand what's taking up all that space with SpaceSniffer or WinDirStat or TreeSize Free.  - I've used a large number of Windows Folder Size checkers, and the one I keep coming back to is WinDirStat. WinDirStat is oldish but is Open Source, and it works great in Windows. It's wonderfully multi-threaded and is generally fabulous. It'll help you find those crazy large log files you've forgotten about deep in %APPDATA%. It saved me 10 gigs of random goo. SpaceSniffer is also amazing and really lets you drill into what's going on space-wise in your disk.
  • Remove Old Stuff - Just go into Add/Remove Programs or Programs and Features and tidy up. There's likely a pile of old crap in there that's taking up space. I removed some Games and Game Demos and got back 5 gigs.
    Be sure to SORT by size to find big stuff AND sort by "installed on" to find old stuff you've forgotten! Also note the "Total size" at the bottom that no one notices. This is the total size of Desktop apps, not Windows Store apps.
    image
  • Uninstall anything evil - If you want to get a quick look at what's on a machine and uninstall LOTS of stuff quickly, look no further than NirSoft's My Uninstaller (download). Remove Toolbars (they think they need them and they never do and won't miss them), and anything that looks like it might destabilize their system. I check out toolbars, add-ins, etc
  • Wasteful TempFiles/ScratchFiles Settings in Popular Programs - Most programs that need scratch space have a way to set a ceiling on that Max Space. Go into Internet Explorer or Firefox, into the options and delete the Temporary Internet Files. Set a reasonable size like 250 megs or 500 megs. I've seen those cache sizes set to gigs. If you've got a speedy connection to the internet, that's just overkill. Check other programs like Adobe Photoshop and other editors and see where they store their temporary files and how large they've become. I used SpaceSniffer (mentioned above) and was shocked to find 5 gigs of old temp files from a year ago in little used programs.
  • Podcast Apps, especially iTunes - If you've configured iTunes to automatically download podcasts, be aware that these can app up if you use the default settings. Set your podcasts to keep only the last episode or last few, rather than 10 or more unlistened-to files.
  • A nicely compressed directoryNTFS Compression - That's right, baby, Stacker (kidding). This is a great feature of NTFS that more people should use. If you've got a bunch of folders with old crap in them, but you don't want to delete them, compress. If you've got a folder that fills up with text files or other easily compressed and frequently access stuff, compress 'em. I typically compress any and all folders that are infrequently accessed, but I'm not ready to toss. That is about 30-40% of my hard drive. Why bother to compress when Disk Space is so cheap? Well, C: drive space usually isn't. I've got an SSD, and it's small. I'd like to get as much out of it as I can without the hassle of moving my Program Files to D:. More importantly, Why the heck not? Why shouldn't I compress? It's utterly painless. Just right click a folder, hit Properties, then Advanced, then Compress. Then forget about it. As long as you're not compressing a bunch of ZIP files (won't do much) then you're all set. You might consider defragging when you're done, just to tidy up if you don't have an SSD.
  • Find Fat Temp File Apps and squash them - Google Earth and Microsoft Virtual Earth 3D are really fast and loose with the disk space. You can poke around for a while and next thing you know you're down 2 gigs or more. If you don't use the app a lot, delete the caches when you exit, or better yet, make the cache size for each app small.
  • Remove Crap with CrapCleaner (CLeaner) - This is a brilliant utility that removes crapware, unneeded programs, toolbars and other things that might litter up your machine.
  • works-on-my-machine-starburst ADVANCED: Use Junction Points/Hard Links/Reparse Points to move temp file folders - This is an advanced technique. If this technique kills your beloved pet cat, don't email me. You have been warned. Also, note that I'm only saying it works for me.
    I reclaimed 25 gigs just today by moving the MobileSync Backup folder from iTunes to a spinning rust disk off my SSD.
    Here's the idea. You'll move it to a drive with more space, but you'll LIE to iTunes using a little-used Windows Utility that will make a LINK between the folder iTunes expects to find and the folder you want your backups in. See? It's advanced but VERY powerful, especially when you
    C:\Users\Scott\AppData\Roaming\Apple Computer\MobileSync>dir

    Directory of C:\Users\Scott\AppData\Roaming\Apple Computer\MobileSync

    11/25/2011 10:10 PM <DIR> .
    11/25/2011 10:10 PM <DIR> ..
    11/25/2011 10:10 PM <JUNCTION> Backup [f:\iTunesMobileSync\Backup]
    0 File(s) 0 bytes
    3 Dir(s) 97,594,851,328 bytes free

While your are in there, why not do some more maintenance on your machine, blow out that dust and install some updates? Check out the The Technical Friend's Essential Maintenance Checklist for Non-Technical Friend's Windows Computer.

Hope this helps! If I missed anything, sound off in the comments!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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FIXED: Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) 7E in HIDCLASS.SYS while installing Windows 7

June 8, '14 Comments [15] Posted in Bugs
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I was doing tech support for a friend this weekend. He was paving an old HP Envy laptop (although this happens on some Dell Inspirons as well) and was getting a blue screen in the middle of install. Then, of course, if you're not looking at it you'll just reboot and drop back into setup and get the "the computer restarted unexpectedly or encountered an unexpected error." At this point he was in a setup loop.

IMG_1519

"HIDCLASS.SYS" is the driver that failed. HID means Human Interface Device, and that means "keyboards or mice" for the most part.

IMG_1543

Errors in HIDCLASS.SYS, especially during setup, almost always means that there's trouble with an attached keyboard or attached mouse. I asked my buddy if he had a mouse attached and he did. He removed the mouse, and started setup over again. Setup succeeded. Then, he spent about an hour (and several reboots) getting Windows 7 "gold" (which was released in July of 2009, almost 5 years ago) up to date with patches, service pack 1, and the latest drivers. Then he was able to attach his mouse and it works fine.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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This URL shortener situation is officially out of control

June 2, '14 Comments [54] Posted in Musings
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I saw a URL today on Twitter to an article on Slate.com. It was a custom short URL - http://slate.me/1h0svt8 but since I was visiting it via Twitter, it was wrapped with Twitter's t.co URL, so I really started at http://t.co/sxSvcJnT2L.

When I visited it for the FIRST time, I got this lovely HTTP interaction. That's SEVEN HTTP 301s, count them, 7, before I get to the destination page.

image

It would have been 8 redirects if I'd counted t.co as well. Note also that after it bounced around three of Slate's URL shorteners, it also goes through goog.gl as well.

  • t.co is twitter's URL shortener that acts as a "safety gate" that allows Twitter to shut down a bad URL at the Twitter level. This means Twitter can stop malware faster, they say.
  • trib.al is a URL shortener that provides marketing analytics. They are bouncing me around in order to set marketing cookies because it's the first time they've seen me.
  • goo.gl is what you'd think it is, it's Google's URL shortener.

That's a lot of back and forth just to get me a a web page. And getting me a web page is kind of the most important thing the web does. Redirects are being abused and I don't see any work happening in HTTP 2.0 to change it.

The second request to the same URL is better, but still frustratingly indirect.

image

Every redirect is a one more point of failure, one more domain that can rot, one more server that can go down, one more layer between me and the content.

Oh, and just to be obnoxious, I've created http://hnsl.mn/thisurlisverysmall to make the point. Tweet it!

If you prefer long URLs, you can also get to this post from

http://uniformresourcelocatorelongator.com/aHR0cDovL3d3dy5oYW5zZWxtYW4uY29tL2Jsb2cvVGhpc1VSTFNob3J0ZW5lclNpdHVhdGlvbklzT2ZmaWNpYWxseU91dE9mQ29udHJvbC5hc3B4%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

What do you think?


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.