Scott Hanselman

Leaky Abstractions? My creativity or my ignorance.

January 23, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services
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Has anyone else seen WinSock Error 10055 WSAENOBUFS when working with .NET Remoting? 

.NET is a great abstraction layer, arguably the best, but I tell ya, I spend more time with Packet Sniffers and running around at the levels of:

A. Threading
2. Sockets

than I ever used to...it feels like these two core OS areas are being stressed more now that .NET enables us to built software bigger, better, faster.  Our abstraction layer is creaking under the heavy load of either my creativity or my ignorance.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Ignorance, Confusion and Higgledy-Piggledy reign supreme in the World of Software

January 23, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services
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In a glorious follow up to the Cringely Quasi-Punditry Fiasco, yet another lame editoral has been written.  A weak editorial with ridiculous conclusions published by an uninformed insta-pundit on the crowning social acheivement of mankind, the Internet?  Yes, it's true! 

Carl Franklin mentioned today (yes, legendary Internet D.J. "NET Rocks" Carl Franklin) that he was a bit disgusted with a quote from a one-page article called "Te.Netive" (lame title, IMHO, like a bad vanity license plate that you spend too much time thinking about) Opportunities by Greg Gonzalez in the January 2003 issue of Developer Market News ("Resources & Solutions for Technology Marketing Professionals").  It came in the mail to him today. 
 
Gonzalez is comparing Java to .NET in a broad way, and arrives at this conclusion:

"Microsoft chose, in its feature-rich and all-inclusive way, to accommodate virtually all languages in its CLR. Many older high-level languages, like C, inherently let the programmer do whatever she wants to do in memory. So to be compatible (with languages like C), Microsoft decided to allow a wide-open memory model. So, .Net is, by nature, vulnerable to attack."

Carl and I agree is just wrong, and shows a great ignorance on the part of the author.  Carl was going to write a letter to the publisher.  But he says he'd rather send several.  Please visit Carl's site and send him any responses you may have to this letter, and he'll forward them appropriately.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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GamerTag = Glucose

January 22, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | Gaming
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xbox. Looks like a few people liked the bloggers xbox session idea, but I need some practice, I just got a schoolin' from James. My gamertag is zak42. [Simon Fell]

Awesome...we need to collect a list of gamertags, or create an rss tag for it. ;)

<link rel="XBoxLive" type="xbox/app+gamertag" title="GamerTag" href="Glucose">

Just kidding...anyway, my XBox Live GamerTag is "Glucose" and I'd love to hook up with some strategically minded .NET/WebServices Bloggers for some Ghost Recon...

(oh, and I just beat Splinter Cell - the greatest single player game ever.  I'm SO looking forward to the Downloadable Levels in Feburary over XBoxLive)

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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http://www.computerzen.com

January 22, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | XML
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I [Jason] shipped the March "Managed Space" column for .NET Developers Journal yesterday. It was one of he hardest pieces I've written relative to the word count but I think it turned out well. Along the way I spent a lot of time thinking about what a managed platform should really do - my views of the CLI have changed quite a bit as a result.
[Managed Space]

Jason is hunting for the Zen of managed code.  Sigh...I continue to use "Zen" analogies in my presentations, and have for the last several years.  If you've seen me present you've heard such collectable nuggets as "Just grok the zen of it...you can look up the rest" and "Spend more time focused on getting it and less time sweating minutia" as well as such top ten Zen hits as

"XML is a bowl...it doesn't make judgements about what you put into it." 

Not quite sure what I meant by that one, but it sounds like a Zen Koan and it's in my PowerPoint notes pane. ;)

Anyway...My own personal hunt for Zen is why this weblog is also available via http://www.computerzen.com

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Tips on a Successful MSFT Presentation

January 22, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services
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I just put up a document outlining my tips for a Successful Technical Presentation (with many Microsoft specific tips).  I'm pretty happy with it and I think it provides a lot of good information.  Please take a look!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.