Scott Hanselman

Coding with Shu Ha Ri

January 24, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | Tools
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A reminder on coding standards and best practices from Jim Little:

Shu: Learn the rules.  Practice them religously.
Ha: Break the rules.  Learn where they don’t apply.
Ri: Leave the rules.  Use rules as a tool, nothing more.  (also, “Make the rules.”)

http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ShuHaRi
http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ThreeLevelsOfAudience

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Radio Userland sucks my left ass

January 24, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Musings | Tools
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I need to stop with this piece of...Radio Userland sucks my left ass.  I just lost everything in this stupid editor because radio's use of the IE HTML Editor ate it.  Crap.  I'd use the Mail-To-WebLog if it supported Titles.  Sigh.  Why does Dave Winer have time to post 8000 things a day, but noone in his organization bothers to read their own support newsgroup?  Haven't we been on Version 8.08 for a 11 months?

Question of the day: How do I export my entire Radio Userland life into one MEGA RSS file for archival (read: moving to another tool) purposes ?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Noteable - Extending Windows NT Server 4.0 Support

January 24, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Musings
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Windows NT Server 4.0 pay-per-incident and hotfix support was scheduled to end on December 31, 2003.  However, based on feedback from our customers, Microsoft has made a decision to continue Windows NT Server 4.0 pay-per-incident and security hotfix support through December 31, 2004. Support for non-security hotfixes will not be extended.   Non-Security hotfix support ends December 31, 2003.    For additional information on the Microsoft Support Lifecycle for Windows NT Server 4.0, or any other product, please see http://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle.  

Interesting...I know there are a LOT of NT 4.0 Servers out there...looks like NT 4 will be with us a while longer.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Leaky Abstractions? My creativity or my ignorance.

January 23, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services
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Has anyone else seen WinSock Error 10055 WSAENOBUFS when working with .NET Remoting? 

.NET is a great abstraction layer, arguably the best, but I tell ya, I spend more time with Packet Sniffers and running around at the levels of:

A. Threading
2. Sockets

than I ever used to...it feels like these two core OS areas are being stressed more now that .NET enables us to built software bigger, better, faster.  Our abstraction layer is creaking under the heavy load of either my creativity or my ignorance.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Ignorance, Confusion and Higgledy-Piggledy reign supreme in the World of Software

January 23, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services
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In a glorious follow up to the Cringely Quasi-Punditry Fiasco, yet another lame editoral has been written.  A weak editorial with ridiculous conclusions published by an uninformed insta-pundit on the crowning social acheivement of mankind, the Internet?  Yes, it's true! 

Carl Franklin mentioned today (yes, legendary Internet D.J. "NET Rocks" Carl Franklin) that he was a bit disgusted with a quote from a one-page article called "Te.Netive" (lame title, IMHO, like a bad vanity license plate that you spend too much time thinking about) Opportunities by Greg Gonzalez in the January 2003 issue of Developer Market News ("Resources & Solutions for Technology Marketing Professionals").  It came in the mail to him today. 
 
Gonzalez is comparing Java to .NET in a broad way, and arrives at this conclusion:

"Microsoft chose, in its feature-rich and all-inclusive way, to accommodate virtually all languages in its CLR. Many older high-level languages, like C, inherently let the programmer do whatever she wants to do in memory. So to be compatible (with languages like C), Microsoft decided to allow a wide-open memory model. So, .Net is, by nature, vulnerable to attack."

Carl and I agree is just wrong, and shows a great ignorance on the part of the author.  Carl was going to write a letter to the publisher.  But he says he'd rather send several.  Please visit Carl's site and send him any responses you may have to this letter, and he'll forward them appropriately.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.