Scott Hanselman

At-A-Glance: XmlReader vs. XPathNavigator vs. XmlDocument

April 9, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | XML
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This is a great at-a-glance view of the XML options that .NET makes available to Developers.  [From Aaron Skonnard's article by way of Don Box]

CHOICES
PROS
CONS
XmlTextReader
-Fastest
-Most efficient (memory)
-Extensible
-Forward-only
-Read-only
-Requires manual validation
XmlValidatingReader
-Automatic validation
-Run-time type info
-Relatively fast & efficient
(compared to DOM)
-2 to 3x slower than XmlTextReader
-Forward-only
-Read-only
XmlDocument (DOM)
-Full traversal
-Read/write
-XPath expressions
-2 to 3x slower than XmlTextReader/XmlValidatingReader
-More overhead than XmlTextReader/XmlValidatingReader
XPathNavigator
-Full traversal
-XPath expressions
-XSLT integration
-Extensible
-Read-only
-Not as familiar as DOM
XPathDocument
-Faster than XmlDocument
-Optimized for XPath/XSLT
-Slower than XmlTextReader

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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.NET Framework 1.1 Redistributable is out...

April 9, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services
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.NET Framework 1.1 Final Bits. Looks like the final .NET Framework 1.1 bits are available: ... [Larkware News]

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Google as proof of my Burning Ears?

April 8, '03 Comments [1] Posted in Musings
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I've had the good fortune, for what it's worth, of being the first Hanselman, the first Scott Hanselman, and the 80th Scott ;) on Google for a while now.  So, basically, if you REALLY want to find me, you can.  There's really no excuse if you remember my last name. 

I walked into a few meetings last week and received the whole "Speak of the devil..." or "Your ears must be burning."  Every day or so I notice someone in my referrers list who arrived by searching Google for "Scott Hanselman." 

So, I see a few possibilities:

  • There are a lot of Scott Hanselman's (I know of four, a baseball player, a web designer, me, and a Canadian) out there and every once in a while they search for themselves for some reason.
  • There are a lot of Scott Hanselman's out there and OTHER people are searching for those guys
  • Someone out there was thinking about me and my ears should have been burning as they searched Google

From this very cogent logic, I have determined that my ears can no longer feel the burning.  Clearly, I'll need to see someone about this.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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InfoPath supports only Document Literal - That's not lame at all!

April 6, '03 Comments [3] Posted in Web Services | XML | Tools
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Astoundingly lame: InfoPath 2003 has become the first alleged Web Services tool I've worked with that can't consume Cape Clear's Airport Weather Web Service. Point InfoPath at http://live.capescience.com/wsdl/AirportWeather.wsdl and what you get back is "InfoPath cannot work with this Web Service because it uses RPC encoding. Only document literal encoding is supported." So much for the wide support of XML standards they're always promising. [Larkware]

Mike thinks that InfoPath is lame since it can't do RPC Enc.  I submit that creating a forms/document-centric view of an RPC endpoint would be icky at best.  Since InfoPath (and Microsoft and others) see the world of XML messaging as a document-centric one, it makes sence that this new forms creation tool would only speak Doc Lit.  Frankly, I'd have been disappointed if it DID support RPC encoding.  If it did, wouldn't it be a development tool?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Scott Hanselman, MC*.*, Good SATs, AS, Almost BS, 3 digit IQ, blah blah blah...

April 5, '03 Comments [1] Posted in Web Services | Gaming
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Dear Blog,

Lately I've noticed a lot of people (no names, you know who you are) who are Microsoft Technologists writing articles, blogging, emailing, and suffixing their names like "Joe Blow - MCAD, MCSD, MCDBA, MCT, MCSE."  Is this really necessary?  Is it really informative?  Isn't it like "Joe Blow - I know my shit so step lively!"  Is it better to see all these certifications or would you rather see "Joe Blow - BS CS, MS CS, MBA, 1400 SATs, 158 IQ."  I have a great friend in Boston who's team is arguably the most certified on the planet.  It became a game for them.  For a while in 2000, one of his guys had passed every test MS offered. Sure, I'm MS Certified up the wazoo, who isn't?  Is/are certification(s) going to ship my product on time?  Will my product, written by an MCSD, scale to 20,000 concurrent users?  Is my SQL Server database, written by a MCDBA, indexed appropriately?  Certifications aside people...ship software.  Shrinkwrap it and sell it.  Run successful projects and deliver on time and under budget.  Enjoy your work and teach others.

Signed,
Scott Hanselman, MC*.*

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.