Scott Hanselman

Microsoft's "Whitehorse" - Visual Design back in Vogue?

February 27, '04 Comments [1] Posted in Corillian | ASP.NET | XML | Web Services | Bugs | Tools
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Hey, I was quoted in a 'Whitehorse' article on CNET that's mirrored at ZDNET.

Financial software maker Corillian, for example, said Microsoft's services-oriented approach with Whitehorse and the close synchronization between application models and the code that corresponds to them will yield higher-quality code and help development teams stick to an application's original design, said Corillian chief architect Scott Hanselman.

"You want to fix bugs in design. The closer you get to the go-live date, the more expensive a bug is," Hanselman said.

Whitehorse should also help developers create software more quickly, he said. The combination of the tool's Web services assembly approach and the prewritten chunks of code that Microsoft provides "gives me bigger and bigger Lego blocks than I've ever had to play with before," Hanselman said.

That's more or less what I said. :)  Of course, taken in snippets things like 'find and fix bugs early' sound cheesy to the trained ear, but it's still worth the saying.

I always thought the Visio integration into the Visual Studio.NET Design/Development process was a little iffy and it never really took off for me.  The project 'Whitehorse' will introduce a new series of graphical designers in Whidbey (the next version of Visual Studio.NET) with support for design and validation of Web Services-based systems.  The Toolbox will include a 'Visual Service Designer' that will include a whole series of visual representations of different services.  A conceptual service might be a Web Servuce, a Database, an ASP.NET Web App, etc.

I think they'll get it right this time.  Just a feeling.  A lot of good thought has been put into this feature, and with the emerging WS-I standards, and all the good thought around SOA, all the ingredients are here.

P.S. I can only imagine that the stuff the guys at Mindreef (makers of the SOAPScope product that you should buy) will cook up to integrate with these new designers. 

Be sure to check out the MSDN TV Episode featuring Whitehorse.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Changing the Font Size of the Reading Pane in Outlook 2003: Impossible?

February 25, '04 Comments [10] Posted in Musings
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Is it sadder that:

  1. You can only change the font size for the Reading Pane in Outlook 2003 by right clicking the tiny grey border around the Reading Pane.
  2. When you do click the menu item then move to another email, the option switches back to Medium for the next message.
  3. The menu items have no effect (the font sizes don't change) on 90% of corporate mail including RTF and WordMail.

Is this totally broken or am I totally broken?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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DCOM deserves our respect

February 25, '04 Comments [1] Posted in Web Services
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I thought it was cool that noone commented negatively (as well they shouldn't) when the very prolific Chris Brumme said in his recent post on Apartments and Pumping in the CLR:

In general, I love OLE and the folks who work on it.  Although it is inappropriate for the Internet, DCOM is still the fastest and most enterprise-ready distributed object system out there.  In a few ways the architecture of .NET Remoting is superior to DCOM, but we never had the time or resources to even approach the engineering effort that has gone into DCOM.  Presumably Indigo will eventually change this situation.  I also love COM’s strict separation of contract from implementation, the ability to negotiate for contracts, and so much more.

A lot of folks just knee-jerk and say "DCOM Sucks" and that's not justified.  A while back Clemens said:

Enterprise Services has a very elegant solution for mixing the two models in that it uses Remoting to do almost all marshaling work (with two exceptions: QC and calls with isomorphic call sigs) and then tunnels the serialized IMessage through DCOM transport, which means that you get full CLR type fidelity while using a rock solid transport that has been continuously optimized ever since 1993. I understand that some people consider a 10 year old protocol boring; I just call it "stable".

Preach on my brothers.  In this time where software innovates at lightening speed, some younger and short-sighted developers may thing a 5 year old OS or 10 year old protocol are 'out of date.' 

At Corillian, while our Voyager platform has supported .NET since .NET's inception and supports WS-I compliant Web Services, the core application still uses DCOM for inter-machine communication on the inside of the firewall.  And Voyager still runs [quite possibly] the largest single instance Banking Web site in the world.  It scales quite nicely, thank you, and due to people who came before me.  I poo-pooed DCOM when I came to work at Corillian 3 years ago.  And while I've worked on Voyager these past years, building .NET abstraction layers on top of it, hosting the CLR within the product, and communicating with all breeds of mainframes, DCOM has done it's job nicely as a transport between our distributed services.

Remember my friends (that means you VB guys also) that due to the work of a lot of OLE people 10 years ago, your crown has been paid for.  Now put it on.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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ASP.NET ViewState: Pox on mankind? Or clever like a fox?

February 24, '04 Comments [3] Posted in ASP.NET | Javascript | ViewState | HttpModule
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A good friend of mine (who may or may not reveal himself by trackbacking this post) emailed me recently, with reference to my post on ASP.NET ViewState. 

He had some interesting opinions, so here are some choice snippets reprinted with this permission, with my commentary interlaced:

IMHO viewstate is the second worst piece of the .NET Framework. The worst being "javascript:do_postback" instead of providing clean, lean and mean URLs. Oh wait, they are related -- the latter is the necesary workaround for the former.

I think it's actually damned clever, and quite possibly neccesary.  The HTTP/HTML combination needed an eventing subsystem built on top of it.  DoPostback() does just that with support for Event Targets and Event Arguments.  It's simple, supported, and clean.  POSTing data (rather than GETting) is needed, nay, required to move stuff from place to place on browser-based web.  I certainly can't be putting on this crap in my URLs, can I?  Believe me, I'm all about REST, and I believe the REAL answer lies in both POSTs, and well designed URI/Ls.

Viewstate is bad because I can't set a bookmark to it. Instead of using viewstate, developers who want to create great webapps should pass a querystring parameter for read-only operations. The whole concept of doPostback should be abandoned altogether and developers should instead look up the original HTTP specification which details the ramification of GET vs. POST.

Phooey! :)  Viewstate was needed to allow things like listboxes to POST not just their currently selected item, but also ALL the other items.  Otherwise, how do I reconsitute my listbox on the next go-around?  Better I pay a few BASE64'ed bytes on the roundtrip than head back to the database.

ViewState was just a state bag, and as Brad notes in the comments of the previous post, it can be "normalized" away with a key (I wonder if they are hearing this and will hook it up to ASP.NET Session State in Whidbey?)

Whenever a certain resource is only addressed (and not changed in any way, i.e. whenever the underlying operation is safe), GET should be used so that you allow the user to have a uniform resource locator for this very thing. Just imagine, google.com would use viewstate and such ... you wouldn't be able to address the query for "Scott Hanselman" as http://www.google.com/search?q=%22scott%20hanselman%22. Or the second page on this query as http://www.google.com/search?q=%22scott+hanselman%22&num=100&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&start=100&sa=N. Now, that would be bad.

Now this I totally agree with.  GETs and "hackable URLs" are totally appropriate for an operation like this.  But for a form that includes my credit card info and full address, not so.  Then add in dropdowns and database-backed grids, then maybe a few buttons...aren't you wishing you had an eventing subsystem and a way to reconstitute your controls? ;)

Second reason for why this whole thing (especially javascript:dopostback) is bad: It doesn't allow me to "Open in new window". I use a tabbed browser and regularily open links in new windows. I find more and more sites which just use ASP.NET and don't handcode their URLs anymore leading to "forced-single-window-navigation."

True, I hate that also.  But, to be clear, my mom, and most folks on the web, don't care.

 But let's get back to the topic: the creation of viewstate and the associated necessity for doPostback instead of <a href=""> have created a bunch of non-standard, non-userfriendly web applications.

Unfriendly is up for debate, but non-standard?  I don't think so.  Last time I checked I had ASP.NET sites up running on 15 different browser variants using doPostback happily and transparently.  If there's a better way that will still give me:

  • Server-side Events (onclick, onchange, etc)
  • Reconstitutes the state of my controls without requiring a call back to the datastore.

Then I'll be the first to code the HttpModules or whatever's required to make it happen.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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The Myth, The Legend, the Interop - Using the .NET Framework SDK Interoperability Tools

February 23, '04 Comments [0] Posted in Programming | Tools
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Sam Gentile's second COM Interop article on "Using the .NET Framework SDK Interoperability Tools" is up on MSDN!

Kudos to Sam for another well written and easy to read (while the subject is complex) article.  Now I have yet another place to point folks for Interop Zen.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.