Scott Hanselman

The Wall Street Journal on the Power of Blogging, the Power of Scoble and My Spot Watch

May 25, '04 Comments [5] Posted in Diabetes | Bugs
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Hey, look at this!  An article in the Wall Street Journal with "RSS," "Scoble," "SPOT Watch," "Diabetic," "Corillian," "Hanselman," and "Blog" all in the same paragraph.  That's a hell of a thing, eh?

Regarding RSS:  The technology also has helped some enterprises keep in touch with customers. Scott Hanselman, an executive at Corillian Corp., a provider of financial-services software, bought a SpotWatch -- a wristwatch that receives radio waves to alert him whenever there's a company meeting coming up, and when he needs an insulin boost. (He is a diabetic.) But a bug in his watch, which uses Microsoft technology, halted the flow of messages, and Mr. Hanselman wrote about it on his Web log. Robert Scoble, who holds the title of technology evangelist at Microsoft and who scans 1,400 sites daily with RSS, spotted the blog posting and forwarded the complaints to Chris Schneider, senior program manager at Microsoft's Spot team, who was able to transmit a fix for the bug less than eight hours after Mr. Hanselman first encountered it. [WSJ on RSS]

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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TechEd - Pictures and People

May 25, '04 Comments [6] Posted in TechEd | ASP.NET | CodeRush | Web Services
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Having a fine time.  RD Bingo is a hit, and the current high score on the Apprentice.NET quiz is 7 out of 20 (and the guy who holds the high score actually was a successful contestant on Who Wants To Be A Millionaire!).  Maybe the quiz is too hard? :)

Having fun, and networking with lots of folks.  I'm surprised how many banks are here.  I've got a number of nice leads in my space.

I also spent a lot of time with Mark Miller from DevExpress (CodeRush) and let me tell you this - the Rush is on.  It's hot baby.  Mark's wandering around demoing CodeRush.  Get a Trial Copy and seriously, take a hour of your time and walk through the Users Guide.  You'll make up that hour within your first day of use.  I plan to start writing plugins immediately.

I also went to a party at the top of the W Hotel, and met a lot of fun people.  Here's a few pics:

John Lam and I.  We had a number of arguments.  Highlights were John's use of "Angle-Bracket Tax" and "Buzzword Compliant."

Mary Jo Foley (yes, THAT Mary Jo Foley!)

Right to Left: Bill Evjen (Reuters and countless books, including one on WSE and ASP.NET 2.0 Beta), Ari Bixhorn, the Adam Sandler of Group Program Management, and Dan Fernandez.  One day we will all co-host Saturday Night Live together.

Rebecca Dias (Manages WSE and Web Services Strategy) and stood on stage with Balmer at the Keynote!  Turns out that was the FIRST time - that moment on stage - that she'd met him.  I'd say she did a fine job!

 

 

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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TechEd 2004 - Keynote and the Wizzy Release and more innovation

May 24, '04 Comments [3] Posted in TechEd | Web Services | ASP.NET | NUnit | NCover | Nant | Tools
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Surprise.  WSE 2.0 is released.  Everyone saw this announcement coming, but it's nice to get it out and move on.  Rebecca is onstage right now, doing a demo on WSE and the new Office Information Bridge Framework with Ballmer. 

Wizzy Thoughts

The release of WSE (for me) brings up a number of different questions around Web Services on the .NET Framework. 

  • It's great that these standards are being followed so closely and that Microsoft is so quick to support the WS*.* specs.  However, how long will we have WSE to use while we wait for Indigo and the rest of the specs?  Is it something that will be supported for the next five years?
    Question: Would you go live in production with WSE 2.0?  Or, would you find an out-of-band solution for security? (Certs, IP-SEC, Networks)
    My Personal Answer (today): I would use WSE when required for Interop but with caution.  
    Question: Is WSE the COM-Interop of Web Services (an interim bridging technology that will ALWAYS be with us, but interim none the less) and is that a bad thing?
    My Personal Answer (today): Kinda feels like it!    
    I've been thinking more and more about simpler solutions.  When you don't need routing and intermediaries, why not go move to a more REST-ful solution?  They are certainly easy to write, but there's not a lot of "framework" around it.  Perhaps that's a good thing, but while I could write a REST-ful proxy generator, it'd be nice to see formalized support for simpler architectures.  If you know me, you know I'm ALL about Web Services, but at the same time, the more I read the WS*.* specs and talk to Joe Programmer, I worry that we're freaking him out. 
    Question: The Basic Profile is great, but are the other specs getting too complicated?
    My Personal Answer (today): Kinda feels like it!  WS-Security will be more useful when there is a more support on the Java side.  As far as WS-Policy, it seems that Dynamic Policy is where the money's at and it's a bummer WSE doesn't support it.    

What are your answers?

New .NET Tools vs. Existing Open Source Tools

Now Prashant is showing the Visual Studio Team System (Whitehorse).  It includes Unit Testing and Code Coverage support.  The Code Coverage stuff is pretty sexy; it highlights the code that wasn't tested in Red and the tested code in Green.  I need to learn more about theis new Unit Testing before I feel good about it.

It's easy to justify using NUnit when there are no Unit Testing tools included with Visual Studio.  When VSS came out (actually when it was purchased from OneTree) Microsoft was bringing Source Control to the masses.  While lots of folks don't use an SCC at all, many folks use VSS simply because it's free.  However, often folks have to suffer with VSS for a few years before they justify a change over to CVS or something else.  I'm going to dig into this Unit testing stuff to see how to relates to NUnit (which we use with much happiness) and the up-and-coming MBUnit.  There's a lot of interesting stuff going on.  I don't know if these qualify as "smackdowns," but it sure seems like a few wheels are being re-invented.  I need to get my thoughts straight and think about:

  • MSBuild vs. NAnt
  • Team System Test vs. NUnit and NUnitAddin
  • Team System Coverage vs. nCover, etc.

As an aside, wouldn't it be nice to include Lutz's Reflector with VS.NET?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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A Poor Man's Computer Virus

May 24, '04 Comments [10] Posted in
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I wasn't sure whether to laugh or cry.  It cracked me up though - today in my Inbox:

Hi, I am a Portuguese virus, but because of the poor technology and lack of money in my country I am not able to do anything with your computer. So, please be kind and delete an important file on your system and then forward me to other users. Thank you.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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"ConfigFree" Wireless at TechEd and the advent of Windows XP SP2

May 24, '04 Comments [0] Posted in TechEd | Gaming
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It's wireless, it's crazy.  There's a crapload of wireless access points (APs) at every conference, and I think the number is getting bigger every year.  I've brought two laptops, my work laptop as well as my Toshiba TabletPC m205.  The Toshiba comes with a FANTASTIC program called ConfigFree.  You kind of have to see it to believe it.  It's an application built with Flash, so it's very fluid.  It's also an irregular region and it's transparent.  The dots represent APs and the farther out they are, the weaker their signal.  The AP that I'm currently associated with has a line drawn to it.  They float around as the strengths change. 

 

At the hotel when I hold the laptop near the window on the 31st floor I see SEVEN wireless networks and 3 of them are unsecured.  Needless to say, I'm enjoying the free Internet from the office building across the way.  I may just print them out a surprise message on their unsecured network printer for someone to see on Monday morning.

I'm also running the RC1 of Windows SP2.  I'm very much digging SP2.  The new wireless dialogs are singularly worth the upgrade.

Neil Turner has a great writeup on the changes in SP2 - and they are all good, IMHO.  I'm looking forward to taking a CD to my relatives houses and finally getting them hooked up with a decent firewall. 

One concern: everyone needs to buy AntiVirus software.  You know you have cousins who don't have any.  What do you use?  I use eTrust from CA.  I hear that AVG has a nice AVG Free Edition.

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.