Scott Hanselman

Forged Bush Memos - Someone used Word and had AutoCorrect turned on.

September 13, '04 Comments [23] Posted in Musings
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There's a lot of talk on the blogosphere today about the Bush Memos being forged.  I looked at the memos (pdf) and it takes all of one minute to see that it's true.  The kerning is obviously a Times New Roman class.

BIG UPDATE: Turns out they ARE fake. "The man who gave CBS News disputed documents describes how he obtained them; in television interview, he admits he deliberately misled a CBS News producer."

UPDATE: This from Little Green Footballs - an animated gif showing the Word version and the Memo itself.

This fellow OWNS one of the TypeWriters in question and says he doesn't buy it either.  His site http://ibmcomposer.org/ is the only site dedicated to this typewriter.

Chris Brooks, my boss, had the most damning comment: Look at the superscript for crying out loud.  I gasped. It's the "autocorrect" feature in Word creating a "th" after a number.  Oy.  Someone needs to lose their job.  It's a shame, as I liked Dan Rather.

Here's IBM Composser guy's thoughts on making a "th" in 1973:

A: Yes, but not in one keystroke. To type 111th, you would first type "111", then remove the 11pt font element, and replace it with an 8pt element, then change the escapement (horizontal spacing) to the narrowest setting, half reverse index the paper, type "th". Then, you have to reverse that process by half indexing the paper back down, replacing the 8pt font element with an 11pt font element,...

Here's the Word version, compare yourself.

Steve Richter had a lot of links to bloggers who are following the story:

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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A better way to get an XmlDocument or XPathDocument from FOR XML AUTO without using SqlXmlCommand?

September 12, '04 Comments [2] Posted in XML
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When you use SqlCommand.ExecuteXmlReader() you get an XML fragment - you get no root node.  What's a good (clean, elegant, performant, etc.) way to get an XmlDocument or XPathDocument (for XSLT purposes) populated with the data returned - without using the SQLXML 3.0 SqlXmlCommand stuff?  Secondary question - what good is ExecuteXmlReader() anyway?

Is this gross? It feels odd:

        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connStr))
        {
            conn.Open();
            SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("select * from Customers as Customer for XML AUTO, ELEMENTS", conn);
            XPathDocument xp = new XPathDocument();
            XPathEditableNavigator xpathnav = xp.CreateEditor();
            XmlWriter xw = xpathnav.PrependChild();
            xw.WriteStartElement("Customers");
            using(XmlReader xr = command.ExecuteXmlReader())
            {
                xw.WriteNode(xr,true);
            }
            xw.WriteEndElement();
            xw.Close();
            xp.WriteXml(XmlWriter.Create(Response.Output));
        }

It works though, and produces this.  Of course I wouldn't output it like this, I'd style the XPathDocument.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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I slashdotted Greg, our IT Manager. dasBlog again is holding up.

September 11, '04 Comments [1] Posted in ASP.NET | Corillian | DasBlog
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Our IT Director has been slashdotted.  Heh.  And I did it.  I submitted a story about how he bought a Rio Carbon MP3 player just so he could take it apart and use the 5GB Microdrive.

dasBlog is holding up fine again, but his ISP is having trouble with the size of the images in his post.  He had a LOT of pics on the post.

Congrats Greg, you've joined a good group of slashdotted dasBlog users.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Output an Assembly Version/Fully Qualified Name from the CommandLine

September 10, '04 Comments [0] Posted in Nant
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In the vein of incredibly easy 1 or 2-lines of code, here's another that's too embarassingly easy program to mention considering I asked for help to write it! :)  It IS useful I think though. (Unless there was something included with the Framework that I missed!)

public class AssemblyVersion
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Assembly asm = Assembly.LoadFrom(args[0]);
        Console.WriteLine(asm.FullName.ToString());
    }
}

This will print out the assembly qualified name of any .NET assembly ala:

c:\>assemblyversion.exe clipboard.exe
clipboard, Version=1.2.3.4, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null

This can be useful for auditing and creating manifests/lists of assemblies that are included with a distribution.  We'll probably put it in a NAnt task to make a list of what's supposed to be there versus what IS there.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Piping command-line output directly to the Clipboard with .NET - now THAT'S useful

September 9, '04 Comments [5] Posted in Programming
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I was talking to Jason Whittington the DM Smartie today and he told me an interesting anecdote about he and Mike Woodring.  The result is this riduclously short C# application that lets you do this:

 c:\>type filename | clipboard

Now THAT'S hot.  As I am a command-line fellow and will gladly take the Pepsi Challenge against any of you "all windows move-em around" fools, I appreciate such useful things. 

Now, go to Jason's site and see how he and Mike did it - then slap your forehead and go Doh!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.