Scott Hanselman

.NET To Go Mobility Road Show in PDX on November 8th

September 28, '04 Comments [0] Posted in Musings | Tools
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Looks like a .NET Mobility Road Show is heading to Portland. Slick.

It's FREE, they're giving away a mobile device, and it's all CF-based content:

You will get a complete overview of the Compact Framework from the ground up and how it can be used within your application environment plus some great information on what's to come in the mobile applications arena. You'll also get a valuable Mobile Application Development Toolkit, a great .NET Compact Framework Pocket Guide, and the chance to win a mobile device! Come and join us for this FREE 3-hour mobile solution workshop.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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New Corillian and Microsoft Scalability Case Study

September 27, '04 Comments [3] Posted in ASP.NET | DevDays | eFinance
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There's a new Corillian/Microsoft Scalability Case Study. A few highlights (Emphasis mine):

  • Currently, more than 19 million end users—or about 25 percent of U.S. online banking customers—use Corillian technology when they use their institution's online services for transactions such as checking balances, paying bills, and transferring funds between accounts. (Not bad for a Microsoft-based platform, eh? .NET works.)
  • Voyager 3.1 was able to support 70,000 concurrent users across multiple lines of business.
  • Voyager 3.1 was able to support a sustained throughput rate of more than 1,268 transactions per second — about 4.5 million successful transactions per hour—and a sustained session creation rate of more than 208 new sessions per second.
  • Voyager 3.1 supported more than 129,000 concurrent sessions across the system at peak load. This includes both active sessions, in which a user is executing transactions, and inactive sessions.
  • Voyager 3.1 supported a ramp-up from 0 to 70,000 users in only 15 minutes—without any adverse impact on performance—demonstrating that Voyager can sustain a large burst of users accessing information in a short time period without overwhelming the system.
  • Voyager 3.1 surpassed its previous benchmark of 30,000 concurrent users by 133 percent, with only a 32-percent increase in overall hardware cost.

It's fun to work on big stuff at Corillian. The case study is at the Microsoft site here.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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GlucoMON - Long Range Wireless delivery of Blood Sugar information for Diabetic Kids

September 27, '04 Comments [1] Posted in Diabetes | Javascript
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Great stuff happening from my buddy Kevin McMahon at DiabeTech with their GlucoMON.

If your child (or spouse, or whoever) checks their blood sugar, you get a message like this SMS via their alert system:

From: GlucoMON @diabetech.net/ GlucoMON Alert for Pat/
Pat's blood
glucose=166@12:03 AM 09/27/2004

There's a review of it at David Mendosa's Diabetes Site.

VERY cool. Now, how can I integrate this with my SPOT watch?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Rory is presenting at PADNUG on Thursday and I'll be Code Monkey

September 22, '04 Comments [1] Posted in ASP.NET
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Just a reminder about the PADNUG (http://www.padnug.org) meeting next week.

  • Where: Portland Community College Auditorium, Room 104,
  • 1626 SE Water Avenue, Portland, Oregon
  • When: 09/23/2004
  • 6:00 p.m. Pizza, Sponsored by: 3Leaf (http://www.3leaf.com)
  • 6:30 p.m. Presentation
  • Topic: An Introduction to Membership and the Provider Pattern in ASP.NET 2.0
  • Who: Rory Blyth, presenting; Scott Hanselman, code-monkeying

Rory Blyth will introduce you to some of the new membership features in the upcoming ASP.NET 2.0, with particularly emphasis on the Provider Patter and how it makes it extremely easy to abstract away a data store for consumption in your application. Bonus content to be included provided time.

I'll (Scott) be the code monkey, playing Paul Shaffer to Rory's Letterman, playing Ed McMahon to Rory's Johnny, playing Balmer to Rory's BillG.

I can guarantee it won't suck.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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The Programmer's Hands

September 21, '04 Comments [29] Posted in Speaking | Tools
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I've said a few things in the past about The Programmer's Back.  Well, when it rains it pours. We all have pain I'm sure, but since I'm the center of my own universe my pain takes priority. I've had trouble with my hands and wrists over the years of programming. Recently, however, it's become rather ridiculous as I can only type for a few minutes at a time before my fingers and wrists start to ache.

I've got the natural keyboard and I've got the trackball mouse but fundamentally I'm I/O bound when it comes to my hands.

If you've ever seen me present before, you know that I type fast. This is not hyperbole, this is simply fact, my fingers move really fast, and now I'm paying for it. I'm not particularly athletic either and 10 years of not working out has no doubt created a weakness in my hands and forearms that can be covered up no longer. Perhaps I'm just having a flareup, but regardless it's time to deal with it.

I've looked at all sorts of funky keyboards that claim to have the One True Way of typing but I've decided the typing is just not where it's at. It's just one syllable for me to say something like "code" but it's four keystrokes between two hands and that seems ridiculous to me. So lately I've been into voice recognition, first starting with the built-in Microsoft voice recognition software and currently with Dragon's NaturallySpeaking. I've taken a few typing tests online using the voice recognition software and I've achieved up to 100 (160 in one case) words a minute - which is just about what my typing speed was at my peak. The quality is so much greater than it was five years ago when I tried previous versions of voice recognition software that at least I can feel that the future will hold positive things around voice recognition.

In fact this entire post has been dictated entirely with Dragon NaturallySpeaking version 7, and I have to say I'm not completely disappointed. For dictation, it's fantastic. The accuracy is easily 95+%, and the only strange things happen when there are words like "Corillian" that are just too weird for it to possibly understand. However it does mitigate some of these issues by scanning all of your e-mails and all your documents looking for potential vocabulary words.

I don't know if I could use it effectively if I had no hands at all, as most of its commands consist of one or two word chords and it seems to have trouble with very small words. For example the breeze forcibly on the microphone it might say "up" or "pop". It knows about a large number of applications, except it doesn't know about Firefox which makes browsing a bit of a problem. One day I'll have to go Google for additional command sets for the tools and programs that I use.

Seems that a lot of people out there have had carpal tunnel release surgery and continue to have trouble. That seems like an awfully drastic step. The only answer seems to be to "lay off" the keyboard.

Has anyone else had to stoop to this level and use voice recognition software in lieu of a keyboard? Has anyone found a vertical keyboard or some strange alternative keyboard that has changed their life and suddenly opened up new vistas of use for their damaged hands? Am I the only programmer out there with a bad back and a bad pair of hands who's 12 years into his career and wondering what the next 12 will hold? Or do I just type to damn fast?

(P.S. One thing to note, I am using a USB microphone for this dictation, and I can't imagine someone getting this kind of accuracy with an analog microphone.)

(P.P.S. Looking back on this blog post, I shudder at the sheer number of characters and keystrokes that would been required had I'd done this by hand. Perhaps voice recognition will usher in a prolific new era in blogging for me. Or, I'll just ramble a lot into my blog. :) )

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.