Scott Hanselman

Turning off AutoComplete for TextBoxes in IE and FireFox

January 27, '05 Comments [6] Posted in ASP.NET
Sponsored By

This is one a lot of people know, but it's worth covering again because it's easily forgotten as it's a small detail. Since we do eFinance sites, we often don't want folks' UserNames collected and stored in AutoComplete, especially when the site is browsed on a public machine.

<form id="formSignOn" autocomplete="off" method="post" runat="server">

Note that autocomplete="false" doesn't work. However, autocomplete="off" works in both IE and FireFox.

Thanks to Johnson Michael for reminding me of this tip.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Internet access (and Skype) at 36000ft. Schweet.

January 26, '05 Comments [6] Posted in Musings
Sponsored By

Clemens is such a stud. He chatted me last night around 8:20pm PST and was flying SAS to Copenhagen. Apparently for $30 you can get internet access while on the flight. OMG. That would so make a long-ass trip easier.

If you look REALLY close at his laptop screen, you can see my Tiny Wedding Picture (you remember that one) in the corner of MSN Messenger.

He tried to Skype me as well, but either the bandwidth wasn't up to snuff or the roar of the plane was too much for the noise cancelling.

Interestingly, I could hear him typing, and he I, but we couldn't understand speech. Either way, I hope this becomes standard fare. It all done by bouncing off sattellites. I would love to run some TraceRTs on that connection.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

BUG?: Can't use an Asterisk (*) as a character when requesting a URL (page) from ASP.NET

January 26, '05 Comments [8] Posted in ASP.NET | DasBlog | HttpModule | Bugs
Sponsored By

File this in obscure. I'm trying to fix a bug filed against dasBlog where the guy has a Category in dasBlog called "WS-*"

He filed a bug saying that the CategoryView doesn't work, presumably because it has an asterisk. Now, I KNOW asterisks are allowed in values of querystrings, so this seemed weird to me.

Turns out he's using the UrlRewriting feature of DasBlog so he gets URLs like this:

http://localhost/DasBlog/CategoryView,category,WS-*.aspx

The idea is to fool search engines into thinking there are actual pages, instead of one page with an URL like:

http://localhost/DasBlog/CategoryView.aspx?category=WS-*

Here's where it gets weird. We use a thing called the UrlMappingModule to catch ALL requests (all the requests that are handled by ASP.NET) and then call app.Context.RewritePath(newPath) which routes, in this case, the request to CategoryView.

However, if an asterisk (*) appears anywhere IN THE (purported) FILENAME, ala CategoryView,category,WS-*.aspx then ASP.NET never hears about it, the HttpModule's BeginRequest never fires and I can't do crap about it. All I see is an HTTP 400 Bad Request.

So, without digging further, I can only assume that the ASPNET_ISAPI extension didn't think it was cool to pass the request on. Of course, when the * appears as a value int the QueryString, everything is cool.

What other component/filter/module upstream might be slapping this request down? I'm not running any thing special on this development box.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

IMAP vs. POP3 in Outlook 2003

January 24, '05 Comments [17] Posted in Musings
Sponsored By

I use Outlook 2003. We run it at work, and I use it at home. I've been an Outlooky guy since '97, even though it wasn't until 2003 that it didn't suck completely.

I've got a Desktop at home, a Laptop at work, and my TabletPC for on-the-side writing gigs. Since I have only one email address (my first name @ my last name.com) and I will NEVER change it, it's fairly important to me. It's my personal email. I know some folks out there (RichC) have 50 emails like receipts@hanselman.com or someclassIamtakingatcommunitycollege@hanselman.com. But, I just don't like it.

I'm home and work. One email for each. For home, I use POP3 email. I've got email going back to 1989 imported into my Outlook PST. I don't save attachments in the PST because of the 2 Gig limit. Anyway, the Home Desktop is "authoritative." It's on a RAID Array, Backed up to the REV daily, another External HD weekly, and Optical monthly. This means that while I download email on the other machines, I don't "care" about those "versions" and I leave "Leave Mail At Server" turned on everywhere. I use OddPost.com for reading my email everywhere else. 

So, my question is, after all these years: Should I switch to IMAP?

  • Would the ISP become "authoritative"?
  • Would I want to upload the whole archive?
  • Or, do I use IMAP for my Inbox only? and move things around from there?
  • How would I back it up?
  • What if I switched ISPs?
  • How is the Outlook support for IMAP? I heard bad things...
  • Would IMAP be better for my Mom's email?
  • Everyone SAYS IMAP is better...what are the secret CONs that no one mentions?

Oh, experienced emailers...guide my decision!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

The Charity Auction has Begun: Bid on an Hour of .NET Consulting Time to help Banda Aceh

January 22, '05 Comments [6] Posted in ASP.NET | INETA | Learning .NET | Web Services | DasBlog | XML
Sponsored By

The link is live 9am EST Sunday, spread the word!

.NET Charity Auction - http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5552696499 

 

This auction is a charitable contribution. Winners will pay for an hour each of .NET consulting time to benefit the Tsunami victims of Banda Aceh.  ALL of the money will go to help the victims (tax benefit for you as well). ALL eBay fees are going to be paid by thinktecture (http://www.thinktecture.com/) an European consulting firm.

 

Bid for an hour of a .NET Celebrity Consultant’s time. Winners can pick the brain of a .NET Expert for an hour (highest bidders will be first in the “draft” for the consultant assigned to them). Winners can call, email or IM the consultant and use the hour to answer that nagging question, do a code review, or just get some general .NET advice.

There will be 30 winning bids. eBay rules require that all 30 winners pay the lowest bid price. So you are required to pay the lowest bid amount, but are encouraged to pay for your final bid (we will invoice you for both, it is your choice how much you want to donate to IDEP (payments via PayPal)). Here are the participants we have RDs and INETA speakers from all 6 continents and 12 countries!

We've added even more consultants for you to bid on!

Michelle Leroux Bustamante, Kimberly L. Tripp, Jonathan Goodyear, Andrew Brust, Richard Campbell, Adam Cogan, Malek Kemmou, Jackie Goldstein, Ted Neward, Kathleen Dollard, Hector M Obregon, Patrick Hynds, Fernando Guerrero, Kate Gregory, Joel Semeniuk, Scott Hanselman, Barry Gervin, Clemens Vasters, Jorge Oblitas, Stephen Forte, Jeffrey Richter, John Robbins, Jeff Prosise, Deborah Kurata, Goksin Bakir, Edgar Sánchez, Thomas Lee, J. Michael Palermo IV, Vishwas Lele, and John Lam

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.