Scott Hanselman

Wow, that's cool...the new book

April 22, '05 Comments [6] Posted in ASP.NET
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Wow, I just noticed this. Coming soon...Amazon.com Sales Rank: #264,558 in Books We're coming up fast! ;) Bite me, Harry Potter! (The book ships when .NET 2.0 ships, FYI)

 

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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KB 810886 The network BIOS command limit has been reached - Why Does All the Crazy Crap Happen to Me?

April 22, '05 Comments [4] Posted in ASP.NET | Bugs
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Kb810866Why is it all the crazy stuff happens to me? I mean SERIOUSLY crazy.

I am running a VirtualPC with Visual Studio Beta 2 inside it, and I like to keep my code out of the VM and safe on my system. So, I usually share a folder using the Virtual PC built in sharing.

However, for some reason, BETA 2 doesn't like it like BETA 1 did and I get "Failed to Monitor Directory Changes."

I did give this drive (my Z: Drive) full trust, though:

caspol -q -machine -addgroup 1 -url file://z:/* FullTrust -name "Z Drive"

This way .NET won't freak out that I'm running and debugging off a non-attached drive.

But, it still wasn't feeling it, so I disconnected the VirtualPC Drive and did a straight Mapped Drive/Network Share from my VirtualPC to my Host OS. After a few builds within BETA 2 I received this charmer from the Yellow Screen of Death:

"The network BIOS command limit has been reached. See KB 810866."

WTF?! Um. Ok. Believe me, I couldn't have been more shocked if the thing had told me that my CMOS Battery was dead and that I should run SpinRite to reformat my MFM hard drive. Sheesh. Do I need to load freaking QEMM into the UMB to get this thing to work? EMM386.EXE anyone? Can I get a TSR please? Is Trumpet Winsock installed?

Ah, how comforting that there are exactly TWO instances of this on Google, THEY ARE THE SAME SITE, and more interestingly, that I shall be #3.

Google Groups you say? The USENET? Of course. Um, NO. Exactly ONE message from two months ago and that guy received the standard flame - "Why would you want to do that?" (actually he was a little lower level, actually programatically setting up file change notifications within his own app to fiels located on network shares. But still.)

So, I'm told to check out, yes, wait for it, wait for it, the LanManager Workstation and Server keys in the Registry's HKLM/System/CurrentControlSet/yadayadayada.

Serenity now!

Coming Soon, Longhorn from the makers of LanMan and EDLIN!

But I'm not bitter.

Long story short, I shall be doing my BETA 2 dev locally.

NOTE OF SANITY: Before you freak out also, rememeber, this is using the new Cassini-style local web server, NOT IIS. Basically the local web server assumes its, well, local. So, it sets up some local file watchers that are a bit too chatty for the SMB Network Protocol. Yes, I tried upping the Registry Key values from the KB. No, it didn't work.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Updating from early ASP.NET Beta builds to Beta 2

April 22, '05 Comments [2] Posted in ASP.NET
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If you're upgrading some mid-BETA or CTP ASP.NET 2.0 code and you get some cryptic messages like

  • c:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50215\Temporary ASP.NET Files\chapter 10 - 8 - csharp\3e344bac\60be3ec8\-sngkrtn.0.cs(265): error CS0115: 'ASP._Default_aspx.FrameworkInitialize()': no suitable method found to override
  • 'ASP._Default_aspx.FrameworkInitialize()': no suitable method found to override c:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50215\Temporary ASP.NET Files\chapter 10 - 8 - csharp\3e344bac\60be3ec8\-sngkrtn.0.cs 265 
  • 'ASP._Default_aspx.GetTypeHashCode()': no suitable method found to override c:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50215\Temporary ASP.NET Files\chapter 10 - 8 - csharp\3e344bac\60be3ec8\-sngkrtn.0.cs 272 

You'll need to make a few changes. First, you probably already updated your ASPX Markup.

In your ASPX page:

OLD: <%@ Page Language="C#" CompileWith="Default.aspx.cs" ClassName="Default_aspx" %>
NEW: <%@ Page Language="C#" codefile="Default.aspx.cs" Inherits="Default_aspx" %>

In your ASPX.CS source file:

OLD:     public partial class Default_aspx  
NEW:     public partial class Default_aspx  : Page

No free derivation any more, you have to explictly derive from a class that ulitmately derives from System.Web.UI.Page. It is that derivation that will get ride of the override compiler errors seen above. This who post also applies to pages written in VB.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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VSVARS32.BAT missing from .NET Beta 2?

April 22, '05 Comments [6] Posted in ASP.NET | Bugs | Tools
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I may be completely off on this, but when I bring up a Command Prompt I always like to use the "Visual Studio Command Prompt" so my PATH is all setup. Ya ya, I know I can make it default, blah blah. Anyway, the first thing I do is usually dig into Start Menu|All Programs|Microsoft Visual Studio xxxx|Tools and get the Visual Studio Command Prompt and pull it over to the top of the Start Menu.

When messing with Beta 2 while updating chapters for our upcoming ASP.NET 2.0 book, I noticed that my Visual Studio 2005 Command Prompt was complaining about a missing file when I ran it. It was looking for something called vsvarsall.bat or something. Anyway, it doesn't exist. That seems odd that Beta 2 would ship with a broken shortcut...?

At any rate, the good old vsvars32.bat is still in there, deep in the bowels, so I set my Command Prompt to point to:

%comspec% /k ""C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 8\Common7\Tools\vsvars32.bat""

and I was back in business.

I'm still left wondering if it was me, something I did, some schmutz in the machine, or a legit oversight. We shall see.

UPDATE: Vote on the bug here if you like.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Creating an Explorer Overlay for NTFS Junctions/ReparsePoints/SoftLinks

April 20, '05 Comments [6] Posted in Programming
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JunctionIconOverlay_folderTravis beat me to it and in record time. I created a small right-click menu a while back to detect Junctions. I did it mostly because it was 5 minutes work, and I didn't want to take 30 minutes to learn about how to make a File Overlay in Explorer.

I figured I'd get to it one day (yeah, right). Travis, on the other hand, couldn't handle it and took the time. He rocks.

So, Travis gives us, Junction Icon Overlay, today's Cool Util. We should thank Travis by crushing his server with overwhelming amounts of traffic.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.