Scott Hanselman

ASP.NET Beta 2 - Enabling Session State on SQL Server 2005 Express

April 28, '05 Comments [1] Posted in ASP.NET | Bugs
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When trying to enable ASP.NET Session State on SQL Server 2005 Express this evening via:

c:\>aspnet_regsql -ssadd -sstype p -U sa -P password

I got:

An error occurred during the execution of the SQL file 'InstallSqlState.sql'. The SQL error number is 15501 and the SqlException message is: This module has been marked OFF.  Turn on 'Agent XPs' in order to be able to access the module. If the job does not exist, an error from msdb.dbo.sp_delete_job is expected.

So, that's scary. After some looking for "Agent XPs" and finding ZERO results on Google, Richard Campbell suggested:

EXECUTE sp_configure 'show advanced options', 1
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO

EXECUTE sp_configure 'Agent XPs', 1
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO

EXECUTE sp_configure 'show advanced options', 0
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO

I then ran aspnet_regsql again and all was good.

The real question is this: Is this new tightened security new to Beta 2 of SQL or just of SQL Express? Seems like it is to me. Is this something that aspnet_regsql should handle for me? Perhaps. Not sure if this is a bug or a feature.

Now playing: Matisyahu - Fire and Heights

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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TechEd is Sold out: Sign up for my session now!

April 25, '05 Comments [5] Posted in TechEd | Speaking | XML | Web Services | Tools
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TechEd 2005 is sold out. Hopefully you're coming. If you are, please block out time for my session. :)

It's a good time, in a good room.  Join me.

ARC305  Code Generation: Architecting a New Kind of Reuse
Speaker(s): Scott Hanselman
Session Type(s): Breakout
Track(s): Architecture, Developer Tools, Web Development
Day/Time: Tuesday, June 7 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM Room: S 210 E
Code Generation is often used to jump start projects or generate CRUD stored procedures. But what if you wanted to build a more automated software factory? What if the constraints of your business were fairly vertical, like 'Retail eBanking' but wide open, like 'The Web Channel'? By using Domain Specific Languages or by extended existing things like XmlSchema (XSD) or Web Services Description Language (WSDL) to describe contracts between systems, fairly complex systems can be built. This advanced session explores and takes apart a real-life system built with .NET in order to support a legacy C++ application. We discuss the role of Code Generation, Visual Studio Add-Ins and tools, command line generators and compilers, validation of rules and constraints, and Continuous Integration and Automated Testing. Learn how this team generated everything from Domain Objects to the actual Microsoft Word specification document.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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The definition of Ubuntu - Marketing the new Linux Distro

April 25, '05 Comments [11] Posted in Africa
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I'm digging Ubuntu, the new Linux distribution. It's amazing. It just works, and I could really see installing in on a few older machines I've got an not having to worry too much about the users. I'm always looking for older laptops to send to Zimbabwe, but I always struggle with the software licensing. To get WindowsXP+Office isn't possible, so it often ends up being Windows 98+OpenOffice. Even XP+OpenOffice would be nice, but $99 for XP is a little steep for a free computer. I think this Linux distro is perfect for the average Joe.

That said, I'm not sure what I think about their marketing schtick around the use of the word Ubuntu. Here's what they say:

"Ubuntu" is an ancient African word, meaning "humanity to others". Ubuntu also means "I am what I am because of who we all are". The Ubuntu Linux distribution brings the spirit of Ubuntu to the software world.

So I have a few problems with this.

There are 54 African countries. Ubuntu is a Zulu and Xhosa word, from the Bantu language family. At least say "Southern Africa." While a half-dozen African countries would understand the word, don't include the whole continent. I am continually shocked - especially on American news - that Africa is refered to as if it were a country and not a continent with 1/5 of the planet's total land mass. Ubuntu's benefactor is South African and should know better.

Ancient? I suppose it depends on what ancient means. It was popularized in the last 20 years by Desmond Tutu, but the roots are as old as the Bantu language family. I suppose that qualifies as ancient. However, I'm not sure about using "ancient" in this context as a way to increase the awe-factor. Mind you, I dig the distro, I'm just critiquing (not yet criticizing) the usage.

"People" is an ancient European word, meaning "more than one person"

You get the idea. Others have said Ubuntu means "the art of being human." With my very limited knowledge of such things, I'd say a simplier definition for Ubuntu is "humanity." I'm not sure why folks feel the need to read so deeply into such things.

There's a Zulu phrase that old people use:  Umuntu ngumuntu ngabantu.

Now, someone actually translated this as "To be human is to affirm one's humanity by recognising the humanity of others in its infinite variety of content and form" (Van der Merwe, 1996:1)

However, literally (I prefer literal translations over flowery ones.) it means

Umuntu - A person
ngumuntu - is a person
nga - through/by
bantu - people (actually abantu)

Ubuntu (the Linux distro) has the tag line of "Linux for Humans." It's the African "PeoplePC" I say.

P.S. I have a question for the non-native English speakers who read this blog. When you all learned English, were the teachers digging into the details of English words, giving you paragraphs worth of explanations to define a single word? Or did they keep it simple?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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MSN Messenger Encryption and Privacy

April 25, '05 Comments [8] Posted in Reviews
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Here's a very shiny program, Secway's SIMP MSN IM Security Solution. Mark Hammond turned me onto it, and it's very slick.  It's slick for a few reasons.

  • It flat out just works. This is partially because of its interface, and partially because of it's architecture.
    • It's a local SOCKS proxy server that sits between your MSN Messenger and the service. This makes the application transparent to MSN Messenger.
    • It also works with Trillian, which, as an aside, is a program that Patrick Cauldwell swears by, but I just haven't been able to get into. Maybe I need to try again?
  • It makes security easy.
    • The most difficult part of security is key creation and exchange. SIMP makes both a snap.
    • It doesn't handle identity, you say? It doesn't need to; it's already handled by the fact that you're logged into your IM Account!

I'm setup on SIMP with my MSN Messenger account. If you've got me on your MSN Friends List, chat me securely and be impressed with how smoothly your experience goes.

Note: Be sure to check with your local IT department and your company's security policy before you install any software that enables secure communication. Also, note that SIMP is free for Personal use only.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Continuous Integration for .NET - Patrick Cauldwell and I will be at PADNUG on Weds, April 27th, 2005

April 23, '05 Comments [1] Posted in Corillian | Speaking | NUnit | Nant
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Patrick and I will be speaking (extemporaneously, we assure you) at the Portland Area .NET User's Group Meeting this Weds, April 27th, 2005 at 6:30pm.

Join Patrick Cauldwell and Scott Hanselman as they talk about one of Corillian's product's build processes. They will explore NUnit, NAnt, custom NAnt Tasks, automatic reporting of errors, and unit test failures as well as Cruise Control.NET which can enable you to create an Enterprise Wide Build Dashboard for all the pointy-haired bosses to oogle at. It'll be fun, informative, and fast pace.

WHERE:
Portland Community College Auditorium
CAPITAL Center, Room 1508
18640 NW Walker Rd.
Beaverton, OR 97006

WHEN:
4/27/2005
6:30pm

WHY:
Come for the Pizza, stay for the...well, for the Pizza!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.