Scott Hanselman

Time to get moving...

June 13, '05 Comments [10] Posted in Africa
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I don't usually do quizzes like these, but since I just got back from Orlando. This quiz also seems to think there are 4 cities in Africa and 4 in the Middle Easy. Ah, ethnocentricity.

Now, if someone would just invite me to these yellow places...

Your Travel Profile:

You Are Extremely Well Traveled in the Midwestern United States (100%)
You Are Very Well Traveled in the Northeastern United States (71%)
You Are Very Well Traveled in the Western United States (63%)
You Are Well Traveled in the Southern United States (54%)
You Are Well Traveled in Africa (50%)
You Are Somewhat Well Traveled in Canada (40%)
You Are Mostly Untraveled in the United Kingdom (13%)
You Are Mostly Untraveled in Asia (8%)
You Are Mostly Untraveled in Western Europe (7%)
You Are Untraveled in Australia (0%)
You Are Untraveled in Eastern Europe (0%)
You Are Untraveled in Latin America (0%)
You Are Untraveled in New Zealand (0%)
You Are Untraveled in Scandinavia (0%)
You Are Untraveled in Southern Europe (0%)
You Are Untraveled in the Middle East (0%)

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Microsoft's Paint Program Legacy - YAMPP

June 12, '05 Comments [7] Posted in Gaming
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I blogged over a year ago about Microsoft's Image Editor problem when Balmer said "I didn't know anything about this. So I called up some folks at Microsoft, and apparently we make a lot of different image editors."

Personally, I use Paint.NET because it reminds me of Paint Shop Pro before it got an inferiority complex. I also use ArtRage, because it's truly a Painting Program. I use Picassa2 for managing my photos.

(Remember when PSP didn't suck? Remember the glory that was Version 5? Then all the vectors and layers came and it suddenly took four clicks to what used to take one. Sigh. Anyway.)

But, here's my list of Microsoft Paint Programs that I can remember:

  • Paint Brush
  • Microsoft (Kodak) Image Editor
  • Microsoft Picture and Fax Viewer (the Previewer)
  • Microosft Photo Editor
  • Microsoft Office Picture Manager 2003
  • Microsoft Office Document Imaging
  • Microsoft Picture-It, Premium, Publishing
  • Microsoft Digital Imaging Pro and Suite 10 (and versions previous)
  • Mircosoft Photo Story 3 for Windows
  • Microsoft Photodraw (Thanks Wesner!)
  • Microsoft Composer

Did I miss any? Interestingly you can also buy most of these on TWO PAGES of Microsoft's own Marketplace.

Anyway, now, Microsoft has YAMPP (Yet Another Microsoft Paint Program) in the form of Microsoft Acrylic, now in Beta. I'll check it out and report back.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Using Consolas as the Windows Console Font

June 12, '05 Comments [10] Posted in TechEd
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Consolasconsole

Simon Guest and I have been trying to figure out how to use our new favorite font, Consolas, as a font for the command console.

(I'm afraid I can't distribute Consolas online or provide a download out of abject fear. That said, you can find it in any version of the Longhorn bits.)

Seems you can get Consolas out of the Microsoft "Powerpoint Presentation Viewer" free of charge here, which, as a side effect, installs the new Vista fonts. Thanks to Tyler Cole for the tip.

You can add it to the list of fonts available to the console by adding it to

HKLM/Software/Microsoft/Windows NT/CurrentVersion/Console/TrueTypeFont

There is a KB article discribing how to add a font to the command prompt

In my case I added a REG_SZ with the name "00" and the value "Consolas." Then you have to REBOOT. Apparently the reboot is important otherwise you won't get the correct results and you'll see MS Sans Serif instead.

 Consolas

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Scott Hanselman (Me) Video from the Microsoft Podcast Team

June 10, '05 Comments [2] Posted in TechEd | Speaking | XML
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Now I know who that guy was! :) Apparently I was being filmed for the TechEd Podcast! You can get a complete list of all the available Podcast Videos courtesy of Jeff Julian.

The video of me and the GrokTalk team on the TechEd 2005 Floor is here. Note, this isn't a GrokTalk, just a "man on the street" interview courtesy of Microsoft Studios.

I offer a few choice opinions on the giant 16x9 monitors that are all running low-res analog 4x3 signals stretched. But I'm not bitter.

Here's a link to the RSS feed for the TechEd Podcast series, as well as instructions on how to get this content delivered to you via a Podcast Reader like iPodder, or via Media Center 10.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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My GrokTalk - Ten Tools in Ten Minutes

June 9, '05 Comments [8] Posted in TechEd | ASP.NET | Speaking | NUnit | CodeRush | Bugs | Tools
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They are still editing my TechEd GrokTalk which was called "10 Tools in 10 Minutes." It was a quick list of the tools I use to be productive (I'm still working on an updated Ultimate Tools List - possibly done this weekend).

Here's details and links to the tools I used in random order. I'll update this post and include the actual video as soon as it's edited.

These are just 10 great tools that I picked from my list. There are a hundred more, so I'm sorry if your favorite isn't here.

  • Notepad2 (Scite also uses the codebase) - A great text editor. First class CR/LF support, ANSI to Unicode switching, whitespace and line ending graphics and Mouse Wheel Zooming. A must. Here's how to completely replace notepad.exe. Personally I renamed Notepad2.exe to "n.exe" which saves me a few dozen "otepad"s a day. Here's how to have Notepad2 be your View Source Editor. Here's how to add Notepad2 to the Explorer context menu.
  • Cropper - A fabulous screen capture applet. I usually pick simple tools that do their job elegantly. Cropper does just that and it's written in .NET.
  • Lutz's Reflector and it's AddIns - The tool that changed the world and the way we learn about .NET. Download it, select and interesting method and hit the space bar. Take the time to install the Add-Ins and check out the amazing static analysis you can do with things like the Diff and Graph.
  • SlickRun - A free floating dynamic "command prompt" with alias support that continues to amaze. My tips for effective use: read the instructions, edit the slickrun.ini file and bind it to Window-R. Also set ChaseCursor so when you hit Win-R, you'll have a floating transparent command line anywhere your mouse is. I recommend you also use larger fonts! :
  • Windows Desktop Search - The betas were rough and tended to lock up, but the free final edition is tight. I can finally bring up a file almost as fast as I can think about it. One important note that sets it apart from Google Desktop Search is that the items appearing in the result window are first-class Explorer Items. Right click on them and you'll not only have all your context menu extensions, but also Open Containing Folder.
  • TaskSwitchXP and TopDesk - Two better ways to ALT-Tab and Task Switch in Windows. Don't confuse TaskSwitchXP with the old PowerToy. This one is fast and powerful. If you envy the Mac's Expose, then use TopDesk. Personally, I use both and set a cursor hotspot in the lower-right corner to tile my windows. Be sure to have DirectX9 installed.
  • Magnifixer - My ZoomIn tool du jour. Be sure that you have SOME kind of ZoomIn tool installed. I like this one because it automatically follows your cursor and your typing and saves settings without asking. It also has a nice eye-dropper for the RGB in you. Learn how to use this tool if you present at all.
  • CodeRush and Refactor! (and DxCore) - Apparently my enthusiasm for CodeRush has been noticed by a few. It just keeps getting better. However, the best kept secret about CodeRush isn't all the shiny stuff, it's the free Extensibility Engine called DxCore that brings VS.NET plugins to the masses. Don't miss out on free add-ins like CR_Documentor and ElectricEditing.
  • SysInternals - I showed specifically ProcExp and AutoRuns, but anything these guys do is pure gold. ProcExp is a great Taskman replacement and includes the invaluable "Find DLL" feature. It can also highlight any .NET proceses. AutoRuns is an amazing aggregated view of any and all things that run at startup on your box.
  • TestDriven.NET - The perfect integration of Unit Testing with Visual Studio.NET. Right click and "Run Test." The output window says "Build" then switches to "Test." The best part, though, is "Test With...Debugger" as a right click that automatically starts up an external process runner, loads and starts your test. Compatible with NUnit, MBUnit and Team System.

 

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.