Scott Hanselman

New CodeRush Screencasts

December 8, '05 Comments [1] Posted in NUnit | XML | CodeRush
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If you've though about using CodeRush, or you've tried it and given up because it seems to complex, take a look at the new Screencasts that have been added to the CodeRush Training/Tutorial site. The Cool Templates screencast shows the basics of CodeRush, while the NUnit-specific one shows off how CodeRush can augment testing. One of the best, but least understood features is the Smart Clipboard that will dramatically change the number of arrow keys and shift-arrowing that you need to do. There's 900+ templates in CodeRush and it can be a little daunting unless you grok it.

Now playing: Jill Scott - Thickness

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Fatherhood - Part 1

December 6, '05 Comments [23] Posted in Parenting | Z
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CIMG3974

I'm overwhelmed. The idea that we'd be put in charge of this little man without so much as a license or registration is beyond me. Z changes everything.

We took birthing classes, breast-feeding classes (Mo's better than I at this particular skill), and read voraciously. I was at every pre-natal exam; how could I not?

The baby doctor told me that he'd delivered some babies to married couples where he literally met the father on the day of delivery. There may be some folks who study harder for their MCSE. I feel as if I've been prepping for this my whole life. As if my first 32 years are prepare for his first 32. I know I crammed in these last nine months and I'm totally prepared to be completely unprepared.

If I known it'd be so important, so weighty, so powerful, I'd have studied harder in High School. I'd have exercised more, eaten better, drank less soda.

It's more than cuteness. Everyone thinks their baby is the cutest baby in the world (which mine is, of course.) But it's the implicit trust.

This little guy didn't choose us. Choosing us was the most important and effectual decision that he never made. He has no reason to trust us other than he has no reason not to. We accept the immense weight of that trust with open arms.

He cries, and he's fed. Everyone deserves to count on that simple contract. I am overwhelmed at the responsibility, but I know we've got this.

- saZ (father of Z)

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Gotcha in .NET Framework handling of Versions and Publisher Policies

December 6, '05 Comments [3] Posted in Bugs
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PubpolicyweirdAs a publisher of libraries, one might find the need to force a redirect to a specific assembly version in order to fix a bug without requiring a recompile of the application consuming your library. Typically this is done by the publisher using Publisher Policy Files.

Peter Thomas, a wise man in the world of such things and fortunately a Corillian employee noticed this:

While debugging a rebinding problem I stumbled upon an interesting behavioral quirk with how Fusion decides which policy file to use.  I had found information on Richard Grimes' Fusion Workshop that stated that if you had multiple policy files for an assembly, the policy file with the latest version would be used.  This doesn’t appear to be completely true.  I found that it uses the policy file with the latest version when the version is sorted alphabetically.

In my case, I had a policy file with a version of 3.1.0.43 and another with the version 20.0.0.0 (for testing).  I had expected 20.0.0.0 to be loaded but I could see via the Fusion logs and ProcessExplorer that the 3.1.0.43 policy file was always being used instead.  I added a new policy file (all these files used the same rebinding info) with the version 4.0.0.0 and that one stated to get used.  Noticing that the ones that worked were single digit versions I created 10.0.0.0 to see if it would fail to be used as well and sure enough, it wasn't loaded.  Finally I created 9.0.0.0 and it did work.  As I looked at the GAC it dawned on me that it loaded the version that was alphabetically last.

This struck me as so bizzare that at first I didn't believe him. However, it's a little-known bug and will possibly be fixed in the Longhorn timeframe. Until then, if you're using .NET 1.x and publisher policy you'll want to avoid double-digit version numbers. For .NET 2.0 we're told:

For .NET 2.0, you won’t run into this issue due to the policy cache. There's a pretty good description of the policy cache here:  http://blogs.msdn.com/junfeng/archive/2005/05/24/421459.aspx.  It's a side effect of the policy cache, the code with the calculation error is avoided due to the policy cache.

Kudos to Peter for chasing it down.

(and No, I'm not back to work, I'm just reporting the news, so phooey on you for thinking it.)

Now playing: Luther Vandross - Hit It Again (featuring Queen Latifah)

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Z Quincy

November 30, '05 Comments [130] Posted in Parenting | Z
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CIMG3894 (Medium)Z Quincy Hanselman was born in classic style at 1:11am on his ultrasound's due date at 6lbs 12oz and 20.5in with eyes wide open and strong lungs. Start to finish was ~20 hours. Mother and baby (and I) are resting comfortably at Tuality Community. He has a head of black hair and a penchant for milk. Pics to follow on Scott's blog sometime within the next 18 years if there's ever time to use a computer again. All is as it should be. Good night.

UPDATED: Here's a photo of little Z just 10 mins after the blessed event. Also, here's a video of his cuteness. File Attachment: Z1.wmv (1590 KB)

UPDATED: Better pics of Z.Q.

The Name: Z is short for Zzinhle or Zenzwezinhle (contraction of Z ezinhle).  "Hle" is a root meaning Good, as in Kuhle (Ndebele) or Kahle (Zulu). Z means "deeds" so his name means, roughly, good deeds, as in a good samaritan or "one who does good deeds." As far as Quincy, it's just a cool name, and who wouldn't love a kid with the initials Z.Q.?

CIMG3944CIMG3903

CIMG3932CIMG3939

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Transparent Command Prompt in Windows

November 27, '05 Comments [9] Posted in Reviews | XML
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TransparentcommentpromptSince I've been working on my Mac Mini lately, I've been very envious of the various small, but effective, things that make the Mac OS such a wonderful place to be.

The #1 UI thing, for me, has been the transparent terminal window. It's silly, sure, but it's nice. So, I went hunting for one. I knew from my previous hunts for the same thing that it was hard, as Window's Console (cmd.exe) prompt is a different kind of Window than most. I haven't found any transparency programs that would let affect cmd.exe.

I did find this clever hack called Console at Source Forge. It isn't a console itself, rather it's a console shadower. Cmd.exe is still doing the work, but Console has hidden it and is capturing and showing the output itself.

Attached is my console.xml settings file with the colors, font (Consolas), size and transparency settings that I like. File Attachment: console.xml (7 KB) The only thing is that I haven't figured out how to make the window resizable. Otherwise, I've found a nice new command prompt to play with. We'll see if it makes the grade, or if I switch back.

Now playing: Alicia Keys - Fallin'

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.