Scott Hanselman

Subversion case-sensitivity problems

January 26, '06 Comments [7] Posted in Subversion | Bugs
Sponsored By

Does anyone out there also running Subversion find this to be a little disconcerting? Stuart does. There are two issues here, first it seems there's a number of asserts in the release builds of Subversion. It appears the code uses asserts when an 'uncomfortable' state is reached - except that asserts halt/panic the server, rather than aborting the current transaction. Probably not what they intended when the started to use asserts.

The second, more acute, problem is that there's a particular assert that will occur when making a branch or tag using a mixed case string for the repository when the server expects a different case. Rephrased: If you tag a repository named http://foo/bar/trunk but you typed in http://foo/Bar/mytag then you'll bring down the entire SVN server. Nice little DoS on any SVN server, right there. The user only needs access to a single repository on that server and they can bring down the whole thing.

The bug's been reported, but I'm not seeing that it's thought of as a big deal. I hope this is fixed soon...for now, I think I'll keep my home repository on CVS. Whew.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Babies sleeping through the night

January 26, '06 Comments [17] Posted in Parenting | Z
Sponsored By

CIMG4435Z is 8 weeks, 2 days old. Yeah, yeah, I know, we still count days. We've, of course, been trying to get him to sleep "through the night." Many folks, myself included, think that "through the night" is kind of a mythical goal and I've said it when asked. A few days back he slept from 9pm to 3am and that was "through the night" as far as I was concerned. We have continued our quest for a few more hours sleep, though.

Now, I know all babies are different and this all may be a fluke and there will be times when he's 8 years old and won't sleep through the night, but for the most part, I think our general technique is working. I'm sure you've got similar tips.

Z slept from 11pm until past 8am last night freeing us (and particularly my wife) up to sleep 9 hours. Here's what my extensive () eight weeks of parenting has taught me.

  • Routine - Babies love routine. We put him down, plus or minus an hour, at around 9pm ever night. This will likely head more towards 8pm.
  • Food - We are breast feeding exclusively (no formula) and pumping with a breast pump. We give him one bottle of pumped milk a day, so he's used to it in case of emergency.
    • We give him a bottle just before bed to really fill him up. Babies seem to get comforted by the boob more than the bottle, so he'll drink as much as 4oz with the bottle, eyes open while he'll go into "buffet mode" on the boob and pass out. When he's that full, and keeps it down, he'll sleep for hours, not being awoke by hunger.
    • We'll also sometimes "top him off" just before he's put into the crib (which is next to our bed)
    • Another technique that is well thought of that we haven't tried is to give a breast-fed baby one formula bottle a night. Formula is harder to digest and says in the tummy longer, letting babies sleep longer as a result.
  • Warm Bath - After he eats and gives us the obligatory and nearly immediate gift of poo, he takes a bath(picture above) in water that's warm (100 degrees F). We'd been using lukewarm water and he used to freak out. When we switched to using rubber-ducky thermometer that checks for temperature safety we make it hotter. He loves the tub at only eight weeks. Totally relaxes him.
  • Set the Stage - We've also started lowering the lights and turning on the radio around this time. Too much light seems to freak babies (at least this one) out. We slow down, talk quiet and generally prep him for a quiet time.
  • Swaddling - Don't use a receiving blanket to swaddle, it'll never work, too small. We use this blanket because it's huge - 42"x42". When he's on lockdown he can't wake himself up with spastic arms.
  • Down is down - Now that he's put down he'll cry here and there, but we believe he's to young for us to Ferber him (in the hardcore way). However, we do avoid picking him up when he's down as it just starts the whole process over. We stoke his face and comb his hair and generally watch for the difference between "sobbing" and "crying." He sobs when he's tired, he cries when something's wrong.

CIMG4437None of this is rocket science and I assume it's all up for debate and variability. However, it's working better each night and knock wood, it'll continue to work for the most part.

All of this means a happier baby when he's awake and gives the wife and I time together before we collapse from exhaustion, wake up, rinse and repeat the process for the next eighteen years.

It's also easier to write posts like this when he's happily asleep :)

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

ColumbiaSoft Enginering is Hiring

January 26, '06 Comments [3] Posted in Musings
Sponsored By

I'm a fan of ColumbiaSoft's Document Locator here in Portland and I have a lot of friends over there, so I'm just posting to let folks know that they are hiring:

ColumbiaSoft is continuing to grow as an organization and as a result, the engineering department now has 2 job openings available. As we have all experienced, there is often a shortage of quality IT professionals and often times a referral can be a great assets in hiring resources. If you know of anyone in .NET Web development or software support looking for employment or changing positions to a fun, fast-paced environment organization where their contributions will be noticed, please have them check out the following link: http://www.documentlocator.com/company/employment.htm

I know folks who read this blog either are folks who know .NET or who know folks who know folks who know .NET so, pass this info on, as someone could find themselves a gig with a really interesting company. (Unless of course, you want to come work with us here at Corillian.) With either, tell 'em Scott sent you.

Now playing: Rent - Tango: Maureen

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Calling NUnit from NAnt Pragmatically

January 26, '06 Comments [2] Posted in Learning .NET | ASP.NET | NUnit | Nant | Tools
Sponsored By

Often times when calling NUnit tests from NAnt scripts we use the nunit2 NAnt task. However, as NAnt version march on and NUnit versions do as well, one gets into assembly binding problems. You might using NUnit 2.2.6.0 and NAnt's compiled with 2.2.0.0. This can be solved with assembly binding redirects but, eh. Poo.  This week on the XP Mailing List Charlie Poole said this:

If it's not too much trouble, revise your testing target to use <exec> rather than <nunit2> Since my copy of NUnit itself is continually evolving, I use <exec> for testing NUnit. You could also keep both targets in the script, since the task will most likely be upgraded soon. - Charlie Poole

I'd been avoiding having to call NUnitConsole.exe from the exec task just because it felt "icky." However, seeing that Charlie and he has +1 Charisma when attacking with NUnit, I am rethinking my objections. Then he added:

One bit of good news: we're working on creating a stable interface for tools
like Nant to use across NUnit versions. - Charlie Poole

Yay! I await it eagerly. While you're reading this, go get TestDriven.NET and start reading Jamie Cansdale's Blog. I'm surprised more people aren't impressed that his stuff supports the Express SKUs considering that Add-Ins aren't supported (explicitly locked out) with Express.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Hanselminutes Podcast 3

January 25, '06 Comments [4] Posted in Podcast | ASP.NET | XML | Tools
Sponsored By

HanselminutesMy third Podcast is up. We talk about geotagging, ubuntu, Macs on Windows, XSLT Performance amongst other things and share some new tools.

We're listed in the iTunes Podcast Directory, so I encourage you to subscribe with a single click (two in Firefox) with the button below. For those of you on slower connections there are lo-fi and torrent-based versions as well. We're looking into a .zip version for folks who have audio extensions blocked at work.

Subscribe to my Podcast in iTunes

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

  • Each show will include a number of links, and all those links will be posted along with the show on the site. There were 15 sites mentioned in this third episode, some planned, some not. We're trying Shrinkster.com on this show.
  • The basic MP3 feed is here, and the iPod friendly one is here. There's a number of other ways you can get it (streaming, straight download, etc) that are all up on the site just below the fold. I use iTunes, myself, to listen to most podcasts, but I also use FeedDemon and it's built in support. IPodder is also a nice, free, client.
  • Note that for now, because of bandwidth constraints, the feeds always have just the current show. If you want to get an old show (and because many Podcasting Clients aren't smart enough to not download the file more than once) you can always find them at http://www.hanselminutes.com.
  • I have, and will, also include the enclosures to this feed you're reading, so if you're already subscribed to ComputerZen and you're not interested in cluttering your life with another feed, you have the choice to get the 'cast as well.
  • If there's a topic you'd like to hear, perhaps one that is better spoken than presented on a blog, or a great tool you can't live without, contact me and I'll get it in the queue!

Enjoy. Next show I think we'll get deep technical on a topic or two, so there will likely be fewer links and a single longer discussion, probably about how we do Continuous Integration.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.