Scott Hanselman

The return of PayPal? TextPayMe offers Pay Over SMS

February 1, '06 Comments [7] Posted in eFinance | Gaming
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This is very interesting to me because not only is it in the realm of eFinance but it also reminds me of a very exciting time...remember back in the day when you could PayPal someone money using the IR Port on your Original PalmPilot? I used to split checks and do all sorts of things.

Now, a start up called TextPayMe has a very nice implementation of "Pay Over SMS". You just text "PAY amount number" to their 5 digit number and you're set. Chris Brooks, my boss, and I have already used to to send money around. Additionally, you get $5 for signing up, and if I (or you) sign up only 35 folks (it's FREE) I'll get an Xbox 360 (for the guest room.) Sure, it's multi-level marketing, but it's worth taking a look at if only to see their two-factor authentication.

SignUp at TextPayMe

You have both a password and four-digit pin. When you pay someone via SMS, you'll get a phone call back confirming that you were serious, then you type in your pin. You have to know something - your pin - and have something - your phone. Very cool.

I wonder how long until PayPal buys them. Anyway, sign up, get your own profile and spread the word. No banking or account information is needed unless you want deposit money.

UPDATE: More on TextPayMe at PaymentsNews, with some specifically interesting tidbits. Everyone but Verizon can use their 70820 number. They will market towards uses by CraigsList users. Anyone who signs up during the beta will NEVER pay a transaction fee. (Wish I'd gotten in on that when PayPal started!) Also, they have support for paying some online merchants.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Vista on a McBook or iMac or Intel Duo

February 1, '06 Comments [1] Posted in Musings | Tools
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Lots of folks out there still trying to get public builds of Vista running on the new Macs. I've said before it's likely not going to happen because of the new BIOs or lack of in the new Intels/Macs. They use EFI and there's no EFI support in the Vista Betas as of yet. Here's some more inside scoop from super-secret-have-to-kill-you-sources. However, it will likely make no difference and folks will still try to ice skate uphill.

You are right it won't happen anytime soon, in the wild. Current builds of Vista Support EFI but its presently disabled and core EFI files are not present in the Vista builds. EFI is yet to be turned on in builds available to the Vista beta test community, until that happens people are just tilting at windmills. However useful work has and is being done to understand what they have done so far, spurred in no small part by a now considerable amount of money folks are offering as bounty. 

Apple has publicly said they will NOT create barriers to prevent the Apple hardware from running O/Ses other than OSX. They won't support it but they won't prevent it either. The word from Microsoft is less clear. There are likely two camps at Microsoft. Camp one probably says "hell no, we don’t want to support Apple at all other than office". Camp two retorts with "any software we can sell to run on Apple hardware is good". Conventional wisdom says that Microsoft is hard at work on Virtual PC for Intel Macs. 

For my part I want to see this Cross O/S Cross platform effort succeed. The easy ability to run both O/Ses on WinTel or MacTel will be a huge bonus. When this is do-able I'm going to buy a Dual Core Laptop and I'm going to do it. I want Intel for Development and DJing purposes and I want Mac for Music Production, Logic, Protools, Garageband + others.  

Now for the good word. Rumor is that Microsoft already have Vista running on iMacs on campus. Likewise it's rumored Intel has a Vista build running on Mac hardware. So it not only feasible for some users, there is a reason other than just the pure challenge for a good many. [super-secret-have-to-kill-you-source]

Secret or not, all this means that the consumer gets more choice, and that's always a good thing, so I ain't mad at 'cha.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Running Internet Explorer 7.0 Beta 2 without installing it.

February 1, '06 Comments [19] Posted in ASP.NET
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Ie7b2Internet Explorer 7.0 Beta 2 is out, and I'm not going to install it - I just paved my machine, and I don't want to throw it to the beta-wolves.

Fortunately this version supports the same hack as the previous. Download the Beta EXE here and unzip it. It's an EXE, but it's a ZIP, so create a folder and unzip the contents into the folder. There will be an UPDATE folder that you don't need that can be deleted.

Create a file called iexplore.exe.local and put it in the same folder. It doesn't have to have anything it in. You can do this from the command line like this:

copy con iexplore.exe.local

...then press Ctrl-Z. Now you can run IE 7 Beta 2 without having installed it (see image above).

OK, REALLY, FINAL UPDATE: This messed up my system as well such that clicking links in IE would open them in FireFox. While a neat trick, suboptimal at best. Thanks to Jon Galloway, I fixed it with this .reg file that deletes some tumor in the Registry:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[-HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{C90250F3-4D7D-4991-9B69-A5C5BC1C2AE6}]

UPDATE: From the IEBlog "As Chris Wilson pointed out, "'IE' is actually a collection of system components - networking, browser hosting, core HTML rendering, printing, etc. When we install a new version of IE, we're installing it for all applications that use these system components - including the tiny iexplore.exe itself." Because of this, we do not support the various hacks that allow side by side running of IE6 and the IE7 Beta 2 Preview. Running with these could cause issues with the stability of a system. 

So, seriously, now I'm sorry I even mentioned it. ;) Your Mileage May Vary. I recommend hanging back while we learn why this is all so hard.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes Podcast 4

February 1, '06 Comments [4] Posted in Podcast | ASP.NET | XML | Tools
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HanselminutesMy fourth Podcast is up. This was one is on Continuous Integration in .NET.

We're listed in the iTunes Podcast Directory, so I encourage you to subscribe with a single click (two in Firefox) with the button below. For those of you on slower connections there are lo-fi and torrent-based versions as well.

Subscribe to my Podcast in iTunes

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

  • Each show will include a number of links, and all those links will be posted along with the show on the site. There were 15 sites mentioned in this fourth episode, some planned, some not. We're still using Shrinkster.com on this show.
  • The basic MP3 feed is here, and the iPod friendly one is here. There's a number of other ways you can get it (streaming, straight download, etc) that are all up on the site just below the fold. I use iTunes, myself, to listen to most podcasts, but I also use FeedDemon and it's built in support. IPodder is also a nice, free, client.
  • Note that for now, because of bandwidth constraints, the feeds always have just the current show. If you want to get an old show (and because many Podcasting Clients aren't smart enough to not download the file more than once) you can always find them at http://www.hanselminutes.com.
  • I have, and will, also include the enclosures to this feed you're reading, so if you're already subscribed to ComputerZen and you're not interested in cluttering your life with another feed, you have the choice to get the 'cast as well.
  • If there's a topic you'd like to hear, perhaps one that is better spoken than presented on a blog, or a great tool you can't live without, contact me and I'll get it in the queue!

Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Code Coverage comes to the masses

January 31, '06 Comments [1] Posted in ASP.NET | Coding4Fun | NUnit | NCover | XML | Tools
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Jamie Cansdale has done it again. Jamie's the maker of TestDriven.NET, the Visual Studio AddIn that I use religiously. It's really a must-install for Visual Studio.NET.

His new version adds a few new features of note. First, "Test With...Coverage." You have to see this to believe it. Sure, Visual Studio.NET 2005 Team System supports code coverage, but not everyone is on the latest and greatest.

The test coverage uses NCover and Grant Drake's NCoverExplorer, a tool that reads NCover's XML files and eschews the slow default XSL integration for a streaming approach. It's wicked fast, I can speak to that.

TestDriven.NET now offers code coverage integration for all Visual Studio Users. All of them. Since I do all my Coding4Fun development using the Express SKUs, I installed this on my Tablet PC. Not only does it integrate with my Visual Studio 2003 (.NET 1.1) install, but it also added coverage support in Express. Very cool. The free Express SKUs along with Jamie's stuff will really open up the possibilities for development in 3rd world countries where not everyone can afford a MSDN license.

Kudos for Microsoft for making the Express SKUs so powerful and kudos to Jamie for improving Test Driven.NET with code coverage.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.