Scott Hanselman

INETA ASP.NET Canada Roadshow

February 22, '06 Comments [4] Posted in ASP.NET | DasBlog | Internationalization | Speaking | HttpHandler | HttpModule | Web Services
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I'll be speaking in Vancouver, BC on March 6th, 2006 at .NET BC and in Victoria at the Victoria .NET Developers Group on March 7th, 2006. Both talks are about DasBlog, working on an Open Source application and what code you can steal/borrow from it. Two cities in a row qualifies as a Poor man's Canada Roadshow in my book.

"Scott Hanselman heads the DasBlog Open Source project along with Omar Shahine, following in the footsteps of Clemens Vasters and his dramatic modification of the BlogX engine. DasBlog is now on version 1.8 and is arguably the most successful ASP.NET blogging engine for the single user. DasBlog is now the work of many folks over many years and while it has some very hairy sections of code, it's full of design techniques and reusable components that you can use in your work today.

Topics Covered:

  • Httpmodules
  • Httphandlers
  • Background threads
  • Internationalization
  • Caching
  • Skinning
  • Creating a macro language
  • Web Services that are more than just SOAP
  • More architectural and design concepts that work in any ASP.NET application"

It should be fun. It'll just be me, but Omar will get mad props even though he won't be there. Omar and I have gone through two DasBlog releases together, first the big performance 1.7 release, then the follow-up 1.8 tightening. Currently 1.9 is in the hopper and will be the last .NET 1.x release as we work on a not-so-super-secret DasBlog.Next project. Currently the checked-in source is very much ahead of the 1.8 release with features like Pluggable Rich Editors with FCK and FTB support, Multi-Author/Single-Blog, Custom Plugin Macros, coComment support, and a much-improved commenting workflow.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Speaking at TechEd 2006

February 22, '06 Comments [3] Posted in ASP.NET | Corillian | TechEd | Speaking | Web Services | Tools
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Cool, Patrick and I are confirmed to speak at TechEd 2006 in Boston. We're talking as part of the architecture track and I think (hope) that our session's title stands out amongst the crowd and generates some buzz:

Dirty SOAP: A Dynamic Endpoint Without ASMX - How and Why? 

If you saw my TechEd 2003 Presentation called "Learning to Love WSDL" (IE only) you might find this new presentation interesting. The system that Patrick, I and others have designed for Financial Services is on version 2.2 now, and our strictly contract-first in-proc system is evolving, as planned, to support SOAP, POX, remoting, Tivo :), and all sorts of things. This system was designed to be, in some ways, future proof, with Indigo in mind. Our developers design their systems with XSD, WSDL (with our custom binding) and code generation and write code like this:

BankingServiceProxy banking = new BankingServiceProxy();
GetAccountsResponse res = banking.GetAccounts(new GetAccountsRequest());
if (res.Success)
{
   AccountCollection accounts = res.Accounts;
   foreach (Account a in accounts)
   {
      print(a.Balance); //or databind, etc...
   }  
}

This puts our developers in a nice familiar place (they've been doing things like this for ~2 years) when Indigo rolls along.

The presentation talks about how we are creating dynamic service endpoints for SOAP and POX, all in .NET 1.1, without ASMX and why we'd want to. (Remember that not everyone uses 2.0 and banks are conservative!) We'll also talk about the (currently being taken) next steps for 2.0 and and world of WinFX.

If you're in or around TechEd this June, be sure to say Hi!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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First Trip Away since Z and the magic of the webcam

February 22, '06 Comments [4] Posted in Z | Coding4Fun
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4600208.boxVideocamI'm down here in Birmingham, AL, on the first business trip since Z was born. He's 12 weeks old today. Thank goodness for Video Chat and Webcams.

I picked up an Airlink101 AIC250 at Fry's for $99. They are also available around the net. I was pricing wireless video IP cameras, but they are like $300+ for one that runs their one web server. I didn't want to get a cheapo button camera because I'd have to run the video output through my computer. The idea of a camera with it's own web server is/was very attractive to me.

This camera is interesting in that it includes Java and ActiveX controls that access the video stream. However, tinkerer that I am, that's not acceptable, so I started poking around. The results will turn into a Coding4Fun article and a .NET 2.0 ClickThrice application that's a modification of some code I found and modified with permission on CodeProject. Look for that soon, I should turn it in this week.

Here's some the interesting things that I found and done, as a teaser:

Motion  Tcptrace

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Answering Questions (and putting your gamercard on your desktop)

February 20, '06 Comments [0] Posted in ASP.NET | Diabetes | Speaking | XML | Web Services | Gaming
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I'm blessed (or cursed) with a lot of email asking questions. Sometimes about Diabetes, usually something about computers (.NET, ASP.NET, Web Services, Development, XML, utils, whatever). It's always nice to get such email, and I do read every email I get. However, I do have a (more than) full time job, a new baby (12 weeks on Tuesday), book edits, articles, blogs, speaking, blah blah blah.

That said, I do appreciate it when folks take time to send email. I love blogging and I love the connection/community aspects of it. Please don't take it personally (some do) when I don't have time to help with binding to the DataGrid, how to poke around inside XmlDocument, or dual boot your system.

When a question is truly interesting, truly difficult, and it's clear that the author has tried the obvious stuff (Googled at least ONCE, please) then I'm happy to take a look.

The best questions, for me, are the ones that turn into a blog post. If you read my blog, you know what my style is and what kinds of questions/problems I run into. If you've got one like that, then I may get to you.

I haven't gotten to the point that Scott Mitchell has with regards to answering mail, but I may get there soon if the dozen or so questions a day continue.

DesktopgamercardHere's an interesting (if only to me) question that just came up from a non-technical reader. Seriously, I apparently have a non-zero number of non-technical readers that aren't related to me. Not sure how that happened or what they are getting from my content. :)

How can I add my Xbox Live Gamer Card (or other generated Gamercard) on my desktop? I answer this question only because it's fun. If the asker had Google'd once, they've have likely found the answer on their own.

  • Right-click on your desktop and click Properties.
  • Go to the Desktop tab, then click on Customize Desktop.
  • Go to the Web tab, then click on New...
  • Enter http://gamercard.xbox.com/MYCARD.card in the location field, where MYCARD is your gamertag.

So, good questions:

  • Hard
  • Interesting
  • Aren't Googlable
  • Haven't been answered before
  • Involve Design, Architecture, Coding in .NET, WS/XML, or on Windows in general

Thanks!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Connect your Xbox360 to your Mac

February 17, '06 Comments [3] Posted in Gaming | Tools
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CIMG4585 (Large)It just keeps getting better. Now there's a compatible UPnP server for Mac OSX that is tailored for the Xbox360.

Note the screenshot of my Living Room TV to the right showing my three systems:

Sure it shows your Pictures from iPhoto and music from iTunes, I'd expect nothing less. But it also supports Shoutcast Streaming Radio via iTunes which is slick.

Now there's just no reason for a Mac household not to get an Xbox360. The company also has a number of other nice looking products for the PSP and iPod, including a Windows-based managment tool for PSP Media.

The only complain I have now with the Media blade on the Xbox360 is that it assumes that your family has only one machine. I realize that is the 80% 95% case, but the interface currently "associates" the XBox with a specific machine, so I have to go over to the System blade to desociate a remote PC and connect to the Mac. My wife will never go for this, so I'll just keep the main PC associated all the time and she'll never know there's other PCs. However, because of this little snafu I'd have to say that WAF is low for this interface in a multi-PC house.

I wonder if there's an "aggregating UPnP server/router" that would collect all three of these sources and present a single unified union of the available media.

Sigh, now I need to de-dupe my 6500 MP3s. The ID3 tags are out of control and I've got dupes all over. At least the MP3s from the CDs I had ripped by RipDigital are pristine. I freaking love those guys.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.