Scott Hanselman

Hanselminutes Podcast 34 - Scott talks to Chris Sells

September 27, '06 Comments [12] Posted in Podcast
Sponsored By

My thirty-fourth Podcast is up In this unusual episode I head over to Chris Sells' house to chat. It's a little longer than usual, but Chris is an interesting guy. We ramble, but cover software design, user experience, programmer personality types, and Windows Vista. This is the first show I interviewed someone on (not counting the TechEd "on the floor" show) so if it's interesting (or not) let me know and we might do others.

We're listed in the iTunes Podcast Directory, so I encourage you to subscribe with a single click (two in Firefox) with the button below. For those of you on slower connections there are lo-fi and torrent-based versions as well.

Subscribe: Feed-icon-16x16 Subscribe to my Podcast in iTunes

Links from the show are also always on the show site, although this show had no links to speak of. Do also remember the archives are always up and they have PDF Transcripts, a little known feature that show up a few weeks after each show.

We have new sponsor for this episode, /nsoftware. They've got a great deal in their Red Carpet Subscription package that includes IP*Works!, SSL, S/MIME, S/Shell, Zip, EDI, IBiz Integrators for QuickBooks, E-Payment, Vital/TSYS, Paymentech, USPS, and other solutions. I've personally got a Red Carpet Subscriptions and I encourage you to take a look. 

Check out Aspose, the .NET and Java Component Publisher. They produce a wide variety of components with versions in both .NET and Java. Do check out their Aspose Demo Downloads as they have a huge catalog of tools to explore.

Our sponsors are Apose, /nsoftware, CodeSmith Tools and the .NET Dev Journal.

There's a $100 off CodeSmith coupon for Hanselminutes listeners - it's coupon code HM100. Spread the word, now's the time to buy. This coupon is good for the CodeSmith Professional With 1 Year Premier Support option.

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

  • The basic MP3 feed is here, and the iPod friendly one is here. There's a number of other ways you can get it (streaming, straight download, etc) that are all up on the site just below the fold. I use iTunes, myself, to listen to most podcasts, but I also use FeedDemon and it's built in support.
  • Note that for now, because of bandwidth constraints, the feeds always have just the current show. If you want to get an old show (and because many Podcasting Clients aren't smart enough to not download the file more than once) you can always find them at http://www.hanselminutes.com.
  • I have, and will, also include the enclosures to this feed you're reading, so if you're already subscribed to ComputerZen and you're not interested in cluttering your life with another feed, you have the choice to get the 'cast as well.
  • If there's a topic you'd like to hear, perhaps one that is better spoken than presented on a blog, or a great tool you can't live without, contact me and I'll get it in the queue!

Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

What's the upper limit on the number of projects within VS2005?

September 26, '06 Comments [13] Posted in ASP.NET
Sponsored By

I had a friend whose team said:

"...most of them have 1GB of RAM and Pentium 4 3.0Ghz HT CPU’s. hey are all complaining about performance, especially with build times. Visual Studio is eating up most of the memory on their systems. Right now those with 1GB of RAM are generally running around 1.2GB of memory usage, so they are swapping like crazy and thus adding even more overhead. There are a couple systems with 2GB of RAM with Core Duo CPU’s. These systems are having the same issues where they are using 2.2GB of RAM, most of which is meaning eaten up by Visual Studio."

And I asked...

"Do they have too many projects in their solution?"

and he said...

"They said 50 projects and growing."

...and Scott Guthrie posted last week on optimizing build times in VS 2005.

"1.2GB RAM usage is pretty out there...50 large projects will strain a system depending on what they are doing. They should look hard at whether they really need all 50 in one solution.  Multiple solutions (even with multiple instances of VS running) work great too."

Clarifying Update from ScottGu:

You should be able to load 50 projects in a single solution - my comment in the origional mail wasn't to imply that you can't.  It was more than 1.2GB of RAM to-do so is larger than I would expect (unless each project is large and there are lots of cross project references).

Editoral: That makes me suspect Resharper as the issue in this case..

As an aside, they were also running Resharper at the same time, and it's currently unclear how much memory was being used by Resharper's on-the-fly analysis. I'll post if I learn more.

Nutshell: Try to break your projects up into reasonably sized subsystems that can build separately. Our SDK has about six solutions, each with about 10 projects.

If you're running VB and you're hitting the VB-specific problem with large projects, you can get a HotFix here.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Why Would a .NET Programmer Learn Ruby on Rails?

September 26, '06 Comments [11] Posted in ASP.NET | Ruby
Sponsored By

Very well written and thoughtful article by Stephen Chu up at InfoQ.

To be fair, I still think .NET is great. It has offered me a place where I am consistently delivering great business value to my clients. However, I constantly remind myself that there are multiple ways and numerous technologies to solving a single problem, some better than others. By being loyal to one technology stack, I am bound to unconsciously make biased decisions, which will ultimately hinder my ability to deliver business value.

Here's some choice tidbits, emphasis mine:

There are a few hurdles I had to go through in learning Ruby. First, I had to go through the emotions of accepting the fact that it will take longer to find a new Ruby solution than to use an existing technology that I am comfortable in. This is by far the most painful experience. But, after a while, you will start cherishing the fact that you are starting to develop multiple ways to solving different problems, and that’s where the pleasure comes in. Secondly, reading about Ruby/Rails only gets me so far. Practically using what I have learned helps me to remember what I have learned. Remember, use it or lose what you have invested time to read about.

This article says, better than I could, why .NET folks should look at Rails. If you're resistant to change (or installing things) try Instant Rails. If you refuse to install anything, and still want to Try Ruby, then try it directly in your browser.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Patterns & Practices Summit - West 2006

September 26, '06 Comments [1] Posted in Speaking
Sponsored By

I'll be speaking with Patrick Cauldwell at the West Coast 2006 Patterns & Practices Summit (PNPSummit) October 9th-12th this year. If you haven't registered and you've got some training dollars, do check out this event.

Check out the schedule of sessions. Not only are Patrick and I there, but Corillian's own "Agilist" Wayne Allen is speaking on Continuous Integration as well.

There's a great lineup for this event this year, including talks from Ted Neward, Jim Newkirk, Peter Provost, Brad Wilson, Rocky Lhotka and many other technorati's with keynotes from Brad Abrams, Scott Isaacs, Jack Greenfield, and Rick Maguire.

Hope to see you there! I'll be ducking out occasionally for the Windows PowerShell Developer Conference happening the first two days. Busy week!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Programmatically Mapping an IIS Vdir/AppPool to .NET Framework 2.0

September 25, '06 Comments [1] Posted in ASP.NET
Sponsored By

We needed to create an IIS Application and Virtual Directory programmatically and while we were doing this, ensure that the VDIR would run only under ASP.NET 2.0. We could certainly shell out to ASPNET_REGIIS.exe to do the work, but this would recycle the whole of IIS (basically every AppPool).

Scott Forsyth at ORCSWeb, my very awesome hosting provider, has an article on a simpler way to make this happen. (It's an older article and older code, but it does work on 2.0 with some simple mods)

It's pretty clever actually...he just spins through the scriptmaps and replaces the current ASP.NET version with the one he wants. The end result is that only that AppPool needs to reset, it's faster, and you don't need to shell out. Thanks ScottF!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.