Scott Hanselman

TMI (To Much Information) Networking Dialog Box of the Day

June 17, '07 Comments [13] Posted in Musings
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networkdiaglogbox

This dialog box is a work of art, truly. ;) It filled the screen on a 1024x768 laptop. I've read through it, completely, four times, and I'm still not quite clear on what it's trying to tell me. One day I shall unlock its hidden secrets.

First, it took me a moment to realize that the choices were meant to be clicked on. They are neither buttons nor hyperlinks. The first choice just closes the dialog...doing nothing. Apparently I'm supposed to make sure my microwave is turned off.

The second one tries to be generic by saying "The following policy" in the first hard-coded sentence. Then the last paragraph actually references BACK to the list, forcing me (rather than the computer that actually has the information) to figure out if the "policy provider identified is Windows Firewall." If it wasn't, I'm to "check the documentation." Helpful. Really. Danke.

The third and longest "not-button-arrow-choice-action-clickable-area-thing" says I should unplug my home's Internet connection. Seems a little drastic if you have a spot on the carpet to lay down all new carpet. (Also, why do we insist on calling these routers "modems"? What exactly are they modulating and demodulating. Newsflash - It's not like I'm calling out to FidoNet every night on my USR v.32bis.)

I ended up right-clicking on the connection in the tray and selecting Diagnose and Repair and all was well. I also reveled in the fact that Diagnose and Repair was NOT available when using the much more common single-left-click on the network connection icon.

Oy, the networking in Vista is SO confusing. All I can count on is netsh (how-to).

Seriously, do yourself a favor and head over to a command prompt now and run...

netsh interface ip show config

...and experience a level of detail that ipconfig /all can't touch. (Which apparently doesn't work as Admin...bummer) You'll begin to appreciate why typing...

netsh interface ip set address "Local Area Connection" dhcp

...can make you look like a superstar whilst others are still clicking around. 

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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes Podcast 68 - Orcas Overview

June 15, '07 Comments [5] Posted in Podcast
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My sixty-eighth podcast is up.  What's the big deal about Orcas, er, Visual Studio 2008? I sit down with my partner in crime at Corillian (now part of CheckFree), Patrick Cauldwell, and chat about .NET 2.0, 3.0, 3.5, oh my! We also talk a bit about dynamic languages, VB 10, and LINQ.

If you have trouble downloading, or your download is slow, do try the torrent with µtorrent or another BitTorrent Downloader.

Do also remember the complete archives are always up and they have PDF Transcripts, a little known feature that show up a few weeks after each show.

Telerik is our sponsor for this show.

Check out their UI Suite of controls for ASP.NET. It's very hardcore stuff. One of the things I appreciate about Telerik is their commitment to completeness. For example, they have a page about their Right-to-Left support while some vendors have zero support, or don't bother testing. They also are committed to XHTML compliance and publish their roadmap. It's nice when your controls vendor is very transparent.

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes Podcast 67 - Hanselminutae #4

June 15, '07 Comments [4] Posted in Podcast
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My sixty-seventh podcast is up. In this miscellaneous episode, Carl and I tidy up our brains and talk about the week's goings-on. 

If you have trouble downloading, or your download is slow, do try the torrent with µtorrent or another BitTorrent Downloader.

Do also remember the complete archives are always up and they have PDF Transcripts, a little known feature that show up a few weeks after each show.

Telerik is our sponsor for this show.

Check out their UI Suite of controls for ASP.NET. It's very hardcore stuff. One of the things I appreciate about Telerik is their commitment to completeness. For example, they have a page about their Right-to-Left support while some vendors have zero support, or don't bother testing. They also are committed to XHTML compliance and publish their roadmap. It's nice when your controls vendor is very transparent.

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Teaching Children and Kids to Program the Old School Way

June 15, '07 Comments [25] Posted in Learning .NET | Musings | Programming
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computerolympicsSee that book on the right there? That's how I learned to program. This book was THE book in 1984. I typed in the whole book on a Commodore 64. 

Originally, there was a meeting between the principal and my 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Hill. They said I was "at risk." I was probably going to be voted "Most Likely to Be Convicted of a White Collar Crime." Anyway, they set it up so I could sneak an Apple II out of the school as long as it was back before Monday morning. After it was clear I'd found my (or "a") calling, Dad decided to get a C64 for me. My dad sold his Van to get me that C64.

You can spend some time reliving your C64 by using the in-browser Java-based C64 Emulator (and games) over at DreamFabric, or by downloading a C64 emulator from Per Håkan Sundell.

I wonder if a book like this could hold a 10 year old's attention like it did for me. I burned weekend after weekend typing in Hex Codes from Compute! Magazine. I paid other kids on the block to read them to me so I could type them faster.

CCS64 V3.2

While I'd love for Z to be a little more well-rounded than I, it couldn't hurt to teach him at least the logic around general purpose programming.

Will younger kids "in the future" program by scripting in Second Life? Don Box asked this question two years ago and came up with answers like, Teach them Lisp, or ML, or Smalltalk or Ruby. I'm not sure what he decided...Don?

Should kids learn a "real" language like Lisp? Or an artificially Kiddy language like Toontalk? Possibly a world like Scratch (from MIT's Lifelong Kindergarten)?

Should kids have their own programming environment as an introduction to the world of engineering? Mark Verber considered these languages for his 10 year old and has a great write up on research he did:

  • Logo: good for simple projects (and younger kids). Once scratch is released, use it instead.
  • Squeak (smalltalk) for older kids whose focus is building artifacts more than programming
  • Scheme for kids focusing on learning computer science
  • Java, Python, or KPL for kids that want a quick path to vocational program

Perhaps what's needed to help Johnny learn to program is a connection to the physical world like Mindstorms Kits or a Viper Robot and PowerShell (video) or the creation of games using tools like BlitzBasic.  Maybe Supercard (remember Hypercard?)

In the end, I suppose it depends on the kid's personality and natural thirst for learning. I plan to let Z know there is a nearly infinite number of cool things to do. The trick will be explaining it without overwhelming him (or myself.)

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Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Error connecting to undo manager of source file "whatever designer"

June 14, '07 Comments [7] Posted in ASP.NET | Bugs
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This error is more than a little irritating, especially considering this is Visual Studio 2005 SP1. I'm getting this, now, for one file, every time I run my application.

Microsoft Visual Studio

The way I "fixed" it was to exclude the file from the Web Application Project, recompile, then re-include, the recompiles.

Seems to me that the error handler that threw this message box should spend more time fixing the problem automatically and less time informing me of a problem I can do little about. Maybe that's just me.

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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.