Scott Hanselman

Bug Migrating Web.config with a browserCaps section to IIS7

August 7, '07 Comments [0] Posted in ASP.NET | Bugs
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When running the "appcmd.exe" tool to migrate an existing Web Application to IIS7, make sure you have a backup of your web.config.

99.999% of the time the changes made are additive, but there is an obscure issue that I bumped into.

Here's some info on the long-ago-deprecated browserCaps section of the web.config:

Using the browserCaps element in the Web.config file to define browsers is deprecated in the .NET Framework 2.0, but it is still supported. The data in this element is merged with the information from the browser definition files (.browser) that is located in the machine-level %SystemRoot%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\version\CONFIG\Browsers folder and any existing application-level App_Browser folders. For more information, see Browser Definition File Schema (browsers Element).

This section was and is used to tell ASP.NET about the capabilities of various browsers, usually mobile ones. The original idea was that it'd be updated a lot by a company called Cyscape but Cyscape has hijacked their own URL and turned it into an upsell for their BrowserHawk product. The community tried to step up, but the workload is huge. There's some good browserCaps sections out there, one from SlingFive a few years back, a valiant attempt to energize the CodeProject community around this issue by Chris Maunder.

As I said, this section is deprecated but supported. The preferred - and easier - way is to use BROWSER files, which are more portable and can be installed with ASPNET_REGBROWSERS.

Back to the migration bug. The format of the old browerCaps section was funky from an XML perspective:

<configuration> 
   <browserCaps>
      <result type="System.Web.HttpBrowserCapabilities, System.Web"/>
        <use var="HTTP_USER_AGENT"/>
              browser=Unknown
              version=0.0
              majorversion=0
              minorversion=0
              frames=false
              tables=false
              cookies=false
              backgroundsounds=false ...etc...

It's totally valid XML, but it's very uncommon to see "mixed nodes" in XML, with an Element, then some text, then an element. In this example the browser=Unknown and all that is just 'tunnelled' in a text node that most folks writing XML processing code would ignore, or not see coming.

It appears that the migration portion of this IIS7 tool...

%systemroot%\system32\inetsrv\APPCMD.EXE migrate config "Default Web Site/DasBlog2"

...toasts these text nodes so that the resulting file is just flat out missing them. This is a common mistake when processing XML that I'm likely guilty of as well.

The Moral and Workaround - Backup your web.config and add this section back after migrating. Of course, this only applies if you're using this kind of obscure section. In our case, DasBlog uses it for Mobile Support.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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32bitness and 64bitness and migrating DasBlog on IIS7 and ASP.NET under Vista64

August 7, '07 Comments [4] Posted in ASP.NET | DasBlog | Musings
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After building the QuadPowerPC and getting it setup with Vista 64, the next step was to get DasBlog building so I could continue development. I installed Orcas Visual Studio 2008 first. Then I realized that I hadn't installed IIS on Vista yet. Doh!

Getting an existing Web App to Compile on Vista64

  • Install IIS: Go into Programs and Features and click "Turn Windows Features on or off." Only certain Vista SKUs have Full IIS - I believe Business, Enterprise and Ultimate. The Home SKUs have a limited version that will serve 3 requests. Enough to develop on, but that's about it.
    Windows Features
    The easiest thing for a developer machine is to turn all the checkboxes on from IIS on down.
    Note: This is a wacky dialog and unless the box is actually CHECKED ("filled" with color doesn't count) then it won't install everything. Open up the tree and make sure.
  • Pick an IIS Pipeline Mode: There are two modes for ASP.NET apps under II7. There's the integrated pipeline, and the classic pipeline.
    If you just create an application and run your existing app with the defaults, like I did, you'll likely see something like this (Note the incredibly detailed error message that I can ACTUALLY do something with...That's hot.):
    IIS 7.0 Detailed Error - 500.0 - Internal Server Error - Windows Internet Explorer (2) 
    At this point I have two choices, I can migrate my httpModules section using this command line expression:
    %systemroot%\system32\inetsrv\APPCMD.EXE migrate config "Default Web Site/DasBlog2"
    Or I can make an AppPool that is configured to use the "classic" pipeline - meaning, it'll use HttpModules just as before with this command line:
    %systemroot%\system32\inetsrv\APPCMD.EXE set app "Default Web Site/DasBlog2" /applicationPool:"Classic .NET AppPool"
    Either expression needs to be run from an administrator command line.
    Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager
    If you change your mind, you can always move your app between AppPools, or make as many as you like. Notice the IIS7-style admin tool shows you what Pipeline type you've chosen.
    If just use the First Option and just stick with classic mode, things will work fine and I don't have to change anything in my web.config. Let's see what happens if I choose The Second Option...
    %systemroot%\system32\inetsrv\APPCMD.EXE migrate config "Default Web Site/DasBlog2"
    Successfully migrated section "system.web/httpModules".
    Successfully migrated section "system.web/httpHandlers".
    At this point the newly written web.config has a new section at the bottom.

    NOTE: There appears to be an obscure bug with this tool when migrating web.configs with the old-style ASP.NET 1.1 browserCaps section. More on that here. Backup your web.config before running this, or any other tool!

    Notice that the modules and handlers have moved to a new system.webServer section, the modules have been marked as managedHandler and the handlers have a preCondition that they are run in integratedModule under the 2.0 runtime. It's worth noting, however, that the original httpHandlers section under system.web remains. This means you can run under both modes with this migrated web.config file, but if you're switching around, you'll need to keep those sections in sync - or, just pick a mode and stick with it.
    <system.webServer>
        <modules>
            <add name="UrlMapperModule" type="newtelligence.DasBlog.Web.Core.UrlMapperModule, newtelligence.DasBlog.Web.Core" preCondition="managedHandler" />
    ...
        </modules>
        <handlers>
           <add name="*.blogtemplate_*" path="*.blogtemplate" verb="*" type="System.Web.HttpForbiddenHandler" preCondition="integratedMode,runtimeVersionv2.0" />
    ...
        </handlers>
      <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false" />
    </system.webServer>
  • Convert and Compile: After doing this migration I opened the main solution in Visual Studio 2008 and it converted and compiled, no problem. Most 2.0 projects will convert just fine.
  • Check Your Bitness: After migrating the web.config and building in Visual Studio 2008 I ran the application, I got the Yellow Screen of Death telling me: "System.BadImageFormatException: Could not load file or assembly 'BasicFrame.WebControls.BasicDatePicker' or one of its dependencies."
    YellowScreenofDeath
    This error is slightly more obscure, but still fairly easily dealt with. Remember that I'm on Vista64. Open up the Advanced Settings of the AppPool you're running in and notice the option "Enable 32-Bit Applications." At this point, I have another choice.
    Advanced Settings
    I could switch this AppPool to a 32-bit Worker Process. I could tell because itwould say "w3wp.exe *32" in TaskManager. Or, I could find out why this is not working and get DasBlog running on 64-bit.
    I'll choose the latter.
    Open up a Visual Studio Command Prompt and run corflags.exe on the offending assembly.
    Administrator Visual Studio 2008 Beta2 x64 Win64 Command Prompt
    Mine says:
    D:\dev\DasBlog\lib>corflags BasicFrame.WebControls.BasicDatePicker.dll
    Microsoft (R) .NET Framework CorFlags Conversion Tool.  Version  3.5.20706.1
    Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

    Version   : v2.0.50727
    CLR Header: 2.5
    PE        : PE32
    CorFlags  : 11
    ILONLY    : 1
    32BIT     : 1
    Signed    : 1


    Notice the 32bit: 1 value. Looks like because the company that sells this assembly used Xenocode's Postbuild Obfucastor and it requires a CPU decision. Consequently I pay the price. Kind of lame.
    However, easily solved because Basic Date Picker has a 64-bit version available for download. I swap it out and check it with corflags...

    D:\dev\DasBlog\lib>corflags BasicFrame.WebControls.BasicDatePicker.dll
    Microsoft (R) .NET Framework CorFlags Conversion Tool.  Version  3.5.20706.1
    Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

    Version   : v2.0.50727
    CLR Header: 2.5
    PE        : PE32
    CorFlags  : 9
    ILONLY    : 1
    32BIT     : 0
    Signed    : 1

    Still with me? Here's the funny part. It's not the 32BIT Flag that actually indicates if the assembly is 32bit or 64bit. It a property that tries to "insist" that the assembly run in a 32-bit process. You can, sometimes force it back and forth with corflags:

    D:\dev\DasBlog\lib>corflags.exe /32bit+ BasicFrame.WebControls.BasicDatePicker.dll
    Microsoft (R) .NET Framework CorFlags Conversion Tool.  Version  3.5.20706.1
    Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.
    corflags : error CF012 : The specified file is strong name signed.  Use /Force to force the update.
    D:\dev\DasBlog\lib>corflags.exe /32bit+ BasicFrame.WebControls.BasicDatePicker.dll /force
    Microsoft (R) .NET Framework CorFlags Conversion Tool.  Version  3.5.20706.1
    Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.
    corflags : warning CF011 : The specified file is strong name signed.  Using /Force will invalidate the signature of this image and will require the assembly to
    be resigned.
    But I can't because it's strong named and I don't have the key to sign it with, and I'm getting a little far down a silly road. Why would you want to compile a .NET assembly specific to 32-bit or X64, or IA? Usually because you're P/Invok'ing into a x64 specific native dll.
    The interesting things that corflags tell us are these:
    • CLR Header: The compiler version...2.0 is .NET 1.1, 2.5 is .NET 2.0 and 3.0 is .NET 3.5. Don't ask. ;)
    • PE (Portable Executable): PE32 is 32bit and PE32+ is 64-bit.
    • 32BIT: Are we asking to force 32-bit execution or not?

Anyway, I recompiled with the 64-bit version and all is well. I'm now running DasBlog compiled under Visual Studio 2008 on Vista 64 running under IIS7. All very smooth. Here's the "It's Not That Scary™ Summary":

It's Not That Scary™ Summary

  • Install IIS
    • Pick a Pipeline Mode and Migrate if needed
  • Compile
    • Confirm Bitness if Error.

So, really, just two steps if I'd been on Vista32 and already had IIS7 installed. Thanks to Richard Lander for all his tips and pointers! If there's mistakes in this post, they are mine, and he'll surely show up and correct them in the comments. :)

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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XCopy considered harmful - Robocopy or XXCopy or SyncBack

August 5, '07 Comments [32] Posted in Tools
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It's just so darn hard to copy a lot of files these days. If it's more than 1000 files or larger than a gig, I don't even try with Explorer anymore. It's not worth the angst. I used to do this:

xcopy *.* d: /s /e /z /v

But when there's not a "No to all" option, and I've got it halfway copied, I get pretty frustrated. There's a few really good alternatives...

Robocopy

First, Robocopy. If you have XP or Windows Server you can easily get this in the Resource Kits. If you have Vista, it's already in your path. That's always nice. It's Robust, indeed (hence, Robocopy) but it's legendarily unforgiving. If anything is wrong with the command line options you'll just get the help. It's so hard to use there's even a GUI Frontend you can get. However, when I want to get a directory from here to over there, I just do this (no wildcards allowed! Doh!) and it just gets there, auto skipping files that are already at the destination. It's also wonderful over an unreliable network:

robocopy "H:\Source" "z:\Dest" /S /Z

Where /s means subdirectories, and /z means in restartable mode.

SyncBack

Second, for repeatable jobs, I love SyncBackSE. It's $30, but there is a free version with less features available. SyncBack is option-ful and literally moves nearly every important piece of data in my house around weekly.

It's UI is really amazing. You create as many "profiles" as you like, as complex as they need to be, using it's very nice wizard UI. I've never had to make a profile without the wizard - it's that comprehensive.

It's a huge part of our backup strategy and it even backs up this blog via FTP. Do take a moment and download at least the trial. Profiles can be named and called via the Windows Scheduler or at the command line - that's why it's really for jobs you'll do more than once. It's a great way to deploy or backup a website, and it'll talk to FTP, WebDav, etc. It'll keep folders in sync, and profiles can be grouped and run in tandem as well. It will also backup and ZIP at the same time.

XXCopy

Last, but certainly not least, XXCOPY. It's huge. Epic even. It's even got a nice windows progress bar that pops out of the DOS Box. The Technical Reference is comprehensive to say the least. Here's a summary of the features. It'll sync directories, maintain short names, qualify by date/time, copy security info.

If you are a command-line bad*ss, this is the utility for you. You'll like it immediately because it's command line switches are mostly compatible with xcopy and Robocopy, then it adds a million more so you can tweak your copy or mirror to be most effective. There's both free and pro versions.

The author is quite bold, and even has a section on how XXCopy supersedes RoboCopy. I think I just stepped in a big pile of sassy! But, I've got to give him credit. The options are insane. XXCopy does it all. Truly. Highly recommended.

Regardless of which one you pick, just please stop using XCopy.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes Podcast 75 - John Lam on Iron Ruby from OSCON

August 3, '07 Comments [1] Posted in Ruby | Silverlight
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oscon_logo My seventy-fifth podcast is up. In this episode I'm sitting down with John Lam at OSCON a few hours after his presentation on Iron Ruby.

If you have trouble downloading, or your download is slow, do try the torrent with µtorrent or another BitTorrent Downloader.

Do also remember the complete archives are always up and they have PDF Transcripts, a little known feature that show up a few weeks after each show.

Telerik is our sponsor for this show.

Check out their UI Suite of controls for ASP.NET. It's very hardcore stuff. One of the things I appreciate about Telerik is their commitment to completeness. For example, they have a page about their Right-to-Left support while some vendors have zero support, or don't bother testing. They also are committed to XHTML compliance and publish their roadmap. It's nice when your controls vendor is very transparent.

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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The Great Geek Gadget Giveaway Grab Bag, er, Auction

August 3, '07 Comments [20] Posted in Musings
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The Greatest Geek Gadget Giveaway, er, AuctionIt's time for the Great Geek Gadget Giveaway Grab Bag. I mean, Auction. You give me money and I give you gadgets. I didn't have a good alliteration that was all G's and got the whole Auction part across.

The full and unbelievable scope of this Auction can not be expressed by the simple picture below. You have no idea the treasures that await you. Perhaps you're a geek. Maybe a dork or a dweeb. Possibly a nerd, or a DIY (Do It Yourselfer). God forbid, a Trekker. Either way, I don't discriminate.

The Auction is up on Ebay right now.

Here's what's up in this amazing grab bag in no particular order. Note also that everything is in working order. Everything runs, turns on, has batteries and operates. Everything has drivers or firmware available on the net. If it doesn't work when you get it, it broke in shipping, YMMV.

Why am I auctioning off this glorious grab bag, Dear Reader? To raise money for an iPhone? No, please. I'm not that gauche. To pay gambling debts? Nope, I stopped watching after Reuben came in second. No, I'm doing it to avoid divorce*. There's only so much the wife can take, Dear Reader. The WAF (Wife Acceptance Factor) only stretches so far, and a decade's worth of glorious gadgetry is about as far as it goes. So, my pain is your gain, my friend.

These items are well loved, but all operational. They've all at one point been part of various crazy schemes that I've had to take over the world, or at least learn how better to interface hardware with my computer.

The Greatest Geek Gadget Giveaway, er, Auction

You pay shipping and I'll send it anywhere. You'll get it in this large plastic bin. I suspect it weighs at least 40 pounds. Perhaps more. I'm sure you'll have years of fun, as I did, with this diverse collection of gadgets.

* kidding about the divorce, but let's just say she'll be happy to see it go to a good home.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.