Scott Hanselman

Visual Studio 2010 Beta 2

October 19, '09 Comments [46] Posted in ASP.NET | ASP.NET Ajax | ASP.NET Dynamic Data | ASP.NET MVC | Learning .NET | Microsoft | MSDN | Programming
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VS_v_rgbLots of big stuff happening this week. Today Visual Studio 2010 Beta 2 is available to MSDN Subscribers and it'll be available for everyone on Wednesday.

I'm running Beta 2 on all my machines now and really digging it. It's much faster than Beta 1 and I'm doing all my work in it now. It's come a long way and I'm really impressed at the polish.

.NET 4

This is a big deal. This isn't ".NET 3.6" - there are a lot of improvements of .NET 4, and it's not just "pile on a bunch of features so you get overwhelmed." I've been working with and talking to many of the teams involved and even though it's a cheesy thing to say, this is a really customer-focused release.

Shouldn't every release be that way? Sure, and in this case there's a really clear focus on, as I like to say, "making the Legos the right size." This is as much about tightening screws as it is about adding new features.

There's more goodness that I can put in one post, but some personal favorite highlights are:

  • Quicker to Install - A smaller Client Profile with a much smaller initial download (down to 0.8 megs from 2.8) for bootstrapping .NET client apps faster than ever)
  • Side by Side - .NET 4 is a side-by-side release that doesn't auto-promote, meaning you won't break existing apps and you can have .NET 2.0, 3.5 and 4 apps on the same machine, happily.
    • Side-by-side CLR support for managed add-ins inside of apps like Explorer or Outlook. Again, new and existing apps in the same process, chillin'.
    • For more details on Application Compatibilty, check out the AppCompat Walkthrough for .NET 4 on MSDN.
  • Dynamic Language Support - The DLR (Dynamic language runtime) ships built-in with .NET 4 so you can mix-and-match your solutions and pick the best language (or languages) amongst C# and VB.NET as well as F#, IronPython and IronRuby. This includes better support for COM (yes, COM! People do use COM and it's even easier with the new dynamic keyword in C# these days.)
  • More Web Standards Support - Better support for WS-* and REST making interop easier. (I love ADO.NET Data Services, but you know that already, Dear Reader. I'm a bit of a RESTafarian, these days.)
  • Plugins Galore - Visual Studio 2010 uses MEF and WPF to enable a whole new world of clean managed extensions as well as an Online Gallery (there's an extension for that!)
  • Multi-Framework Multi-targeting - You can't really overestimate how useful this is, but a picture is worth a thousand words. You can code all your apps in all your organization's frameworks with the same IDE:
    WindowClipping (3)

Keep an eye on the blogs this week as the various teams talk about their favorite features.

On the ASP.NET 4 side:

Oh, yes, one other thing…

Fresh Look

SplashScreen

WindowClipping

You may notice a few things in the new Splash Screen above. There's a new Visual Studio logo that goes nicely as well as a new logo for MSDN. You probably heard that we launched a new MSDN this weekend and today we add the new logo and background. This new MSDN is the beginning of a more agile, community focused MSDN and you should expect to see and hear of cool stuff coming from the team, often, in the months to come. Of note will be the new MSDN Lightweight view, soon to be the default view for the library. 

In the coming weeks I'll dig into more details on the these new things and how they work together:

  • Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4
  • Windows 7
  • Microsoft Developer Network

Enjoy! Also, be sure to check out Soma's blog post and go get Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Beta 2 as soon as you can!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes on Channel 9 - Inside CodePlex.com

October 17, '09 Comments [4] Posted in Channel9 | Open Source
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The CodePlex.com TeamI'm up in Redmond this week and I stopped by to abuse the folks at CodePlex.com. I got to see their hardware, build servers, server room and more. You can even see how they abuse the test team. Lots of fun with Sara, Jonathan and the Whole Codeplex.com Team.

Also, while you're watching, I'd encourage you to check out my other Channel 9 video interviews, including:

Enjoy!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes Podcast 184: Preview of ASP.NET 4 with Scott Hunter

October 17, '09 Comments [0] Posted in ASP.NET | ASP.NET Ajax | ASP.NET Dynamic Data | ASP.NET MVC | Javascript | Podcast
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image

My one-hundred-and-eighty-forth podcast is up. Scott's in Seattle this week and catches Microsoft Program Manager (and one of 1000 Scott's) Scott Hunter who shares insights in the history and future of ASP.NET 4. What's coming in VS2010?

Subscribe: Subscribe to Hanselminutes Subscribe to my Podcast in iTunes

Download: MP3 Full Show

Do also remember the complete archives are always up and they have PDF Transcripts, a little known feature that show up a few weeks after each show.

Telerik is our sponsor for this show.

Check out their UI Suite of controls for ASP.NET. It's very hardcore stuff. One of the things I appreciate aboutTelerik is their commitment to completeness. For example, they have a page about their Right-to-Left support while some vendors have zero support, or don't bother testing. They also are committed to XHTML compliance and publish their roadmap. It's nice when your controls vendor is very transparent.

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Obscure Windows Home Server Tip: Restoring when you didn't have Network Drivers installed before

October 15, '09 Comments [12] Posted in Home Server | Tools
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I've blogged about Windows Home Server before. I'm a huge fan. Recently Uncle Ronnie's new Dell computer had a hard drive die. It was under warranty and Dell had a new hard drive mailed to me within days.

The old hard drive is clicking and unhealthy, but after a dozen tries, I get it to boot off the sick drive. I run chkdsk /f /r 4 times until it works and then quickly (don't make it angry, I say) hooked Uncle Ronnie's machine up to my Windows Home Server via it's wireless adapter and did a complete "one click" backup. This backs up the entire machine to the Home Server. He's running Windows XP but uses dial-up for his internet access. Remember this point as it's significant for later.

Then I swap the dead hard drive out for the new one. On another computer I visit \\SERVER\Software and burn the Home Server Recovery CD in a few minutes, then boot off that CD on Uncle Ronnie's machine.

I'm going through the restore process and it says I haven't got network drivers installed. Uh oh. What now?

Well, there's actually a very helpful link right in the Restore Wizard that says Windows Home Server includes all the network and storage drivers from the backed-up machine at the time of the backup in a automatically-created folder that lives in the backup itself.

The instructions say just open the backup from the Home Server Console. This is cool in its own right, as Windows will mount the backup as a new drive and you can copy files off it. During backup an unambiguously named folder called "\Windows Home Server Drivers for Restore" is made that is full of directories with storage and network drivers from your computer. Again, these are the drivers that were installed when you backed up your computer.

I mounted the backup and copied that drivers folder to a USB key. I didn't have to restart the restore, just press Scan and it loads the drivers dynamically. Unfortunately it didn't find the hard-wired network adapter I was planning on using to restore this laptop.

I stared for a while.

Turns out that since Uncle Ronnie uses Dial-Up, he never had the Wired Network Adapter drivers installed, so they we never backed up!

I could probably try to boot up the dying hard drive, install network drivers, then backup the hard drive again hoping that Windows Home Server would find them and  yada yada yada, but seriously, I'd be tempting fate to try and get this drive to spin again.

Instead, I dug around in the USB key and it appeared that the folder structure was folders named with GUIDs (Globally Unique Identifiers) with .sys driver files and .inf driver info files inside.

I took a change and created my own GUID folder (basically just copy pasted another and changed some numbers). In this screenshot, it's the top folder with a bunch of zeros.

Windows Home Server Drivers for Restore

Now, what to put in it? I went to the Dell Drivers Website and found the download for the Marvel Wired Network Drivers. It was an EXE, but most of these driver downloads are self-extracting ZIP files, so I opened it up directly with 7-Zip (the greatest and best archive utility.)

I poked around in the driver archive looking for .INF files and .SYS files and copied both the Vista and XP drivers into my {GUID} folder on my USB key, hoping that the Windows Home Server Restore that was still waiting on Uncle Ronnie's machine would just scan these drivers and assume it put them there.

{00000000-FC2B-446B-AEF2-CD40874C08DA} (2)

In fact, it worked! I clicked Scan again and the wired network adapter showed up in the list and the restore of Uncle Ronnie's old backup to his new hard drive worked perfectly!

Related Links

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes Podcast 183: LIVE! Gadgets, Hi-Def, WebCams, 4G and More

October 12, '09 Comments [27] Posted in Podcast | Remote Work | Reviews | Tools
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Scott Hanselman My one-hundred-and-eighty-third podcast is up. This wacky episode of Hanselminutes was recorded at 3am on a sad, sad Saturday morning with an intrepid group of UStream and Twitter users who watched Scott chat about gadgets and technology and ultimate fail to save the video. This is the only artifact. This is fortunate because Scott does an audio podcast.

Subscribe: Subscribe to Hanselminutes Subscribe to my Podcast in iTunes

Download: MP3 Full Show

Do also remember the complete archives are always up and they have PDF Transcripts, a little known feature that show up a few weeks after each show.

Telerik is our sponsor for this show.

Check out their UI Suite of controls for ASP.NET. It's very hardcore stuff. One of the things I appreciate aboutTelerik is their commitment to completeness. For example, they have a page about their Right-to-Left support while some vendors have zero support, or don't bother testing. They also are committed to XHTML compliance and publish their roadmap. It's nice when your controls vendor is very transparent.

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
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Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.