Scott Hanselman

Enabling Dragging of an Image to Pin a Site to the Windows Taskbar in IE9

February 18, '11 Comments [8] Posted in IE9
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My site's custom jumplist including Archives, Videos, Twitter and FacebookI blogged in September about a some features of IE9 that I really dug, specifically adding Jump Lists to your website and Pinning WebSites to the Taskbar.

I made a few small markup changes and now you can pin this blog to your taskbar if you're running Windows 7. I also added right-click Jump Lists to this blog as well.

However, I just noticed that the IE9 Release Candidate that just came out includes a little feature where you can drag an image from a website to pin the site to the taskbar.

Clearly this feature was created as an opportunity for me to enable you, Dear Reader, do drag my giant forehead to the Windows 7 taskbar. No question.

Enabling Dragging of an Image to Pin a Site to the Windows Taskbar in IE9

All I had to do was add:

class="msPinSite"

to the image I wanted to use. You can set other options as well, like the image that's used while dragging (it uses favicon by default) as well as callouts for mouseovers and stuff.

I just did this, as it was simpler:

<img class="msPinSite" src="http://www.hanselman.com/blog/images/tinyheadshot2.jpg" alt="Scott Hanselman" title="Drag this image to your Windows 7 Taskbar to pin this site with IE9 - Scott Hanselman">

Here I am dragging my headshot to the taskbar to pin it. Of course, you can always pin any site by dragging the favicon from the address bar.

Dragging the image down to the Taskbar. 

You can even add little toolbars to taskbar with JavaScript (for sites like Pandora, etc). It's all standard markup and JavaScript and it's setup in such a way that other browsers ignore it as they like.

You can also use JavaScript to push alerts to the icon, maybe for new messages, chat, etc. It's easy to this stuff, check it out there's a whole section on MSDN on Site Pinning. You can also View Source on this demo and figure it out. It took me 5-10 minutes. The hardest part for the Jump List was finding cool icons.

One more very nice browser for my collection of All Non-Released Browsers. Yet.

IE9, FireFox 4, Chrome 11, Opera 11

Enjoy.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Updating and Publishing a NuGet Package - Plus making NuGet packages smarter and avoiding source edits with WebActivator

February 18, '11 Comments [7] Posted in ASP.NET | ASP.NET MVC | NuGet | VS2010
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I wrote a post a few days ago called "Creating a NuGet Package in 7 easy steps - Plus using NuGet to integrate ASP.NET MVC 3 into existing Web Forms applications." Long enough title? I think so.

The post exists for two reasons: First to show folks how insanely easy it is to create a NuGet package (and prompt you to make some yourself) and second to share with you some experiments where one enables new/interesting functionality after File|New Project. In that example, we had an existing ASP.NET WebForms application and added ASP.NET MVC to it in one line, making it an easy hybrid application.

install-package AddMvc3ToWebForms

Well, not really one line. In version 0.5 of the AddMvc3ToWebForms package you still have to hook up the Areas, Routes and Filters yourself in the Global.asax. I made a helper method that gets it done to one additional line, but still, it's ever so slightly lame.

Now, to THIS post that exists for two reasons: First, to show you how to create an update to a package, and what the update process looks like for the consumer. Second, to show you how (and why) you should put a tiny bit more effort in your packages up front so that things "just work" for the user.

Creating an Update to a NuGet Package

Step 1 - Update the NuSpec file

I opened up my AddMvc3ToWebForms.nuspec file and changed the version a notch to 0.6. I also added a dependency to another NuGet package called WebActivator that I'm going to use to make my package just work and avoid the need for that extra line of code. I'm being specific and asking for WebActivator 1.1 or higher because that version has a specific feature I need.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<package xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
<metadata xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/packaging/2010/07/nuspec.xsd">
<id>AddMvc3ToWebForms</id>
<version>0.6</version>
<authors>Scott Hanselman</authors>
<owners>Scott Hanselman</owners>
<iconUrl>http://www.hanselman.com/images/nugeticon.png</iconUrl>
<requireLicenseAcceptance>false</requireLicenseAcceptance>
<description>A totally unsupported way to quickly add ASP.NET MVC 3 support to your WebForms Application. Works on my machine.</description>
<tags>MVC MVC3 ASP.NET WebForms</tags>
<dependencies>
<dependency id="WebActivator" version="1.1" />
</dependencies>
</metadata>
</package>

Step 2 - Make your new changes

When bringing in multiple NuGet packages it's common to want to have a few things run at application startup. Perhaps setting some context, connection strings, defaults for software factories, or dependency resolvers. There are a number of packages that need this functionality, and David Ebbo created the WebActivator package to make it easier. It's a formalized wrapper around a new ASP.NET 4 attributed called "PreApplicationStartMethod," and David also enables a PostApplicationStartMethod.

In my new version of the AddMvc3ToWebForms package I created a new file called AppStart_RegisterRoutesAreasFilters.cs.pp. Note the .pp extension that signals to NuGet to preprocess the file and replace tokens like $rootnamespace$, kind of like a mini-mini-code-generator.

The rest should look familiar; we're registering the Areas, GlobalFilters and Routes. The informal naming convention is to prefix the class and file with AppStart_ so that projects that include packages that add an AppStart_*.* will group the files together.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.Mvc;
using System.Web.Routing;
using Microsoft.Web.Infrastructure;

[assembly: WebActivator.PostApplicationStartMethod(typeof($rootnamespace$.AppStart_RegisterRoutesAreasFilters), "Start")]

namespace $rootnamespace$ {
public static class AppStart_RegisterRoutesAreasFilters {
public static void Start() {
// Set everything up with you having to do any work.
// I'm doing this because it means that
// your app will just run. You might want to get rid of this
// and integrate with your own Global.asax.
// It's up to you.
AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();
RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);
}

public static void RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilterCollection filters)
{
filters.Add(new HandleErrorAttribute());
}

public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
{
routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

routes.MapRoute(
"Default", // Route name
"{controller}/{action}/{id}", // URL with parameters
new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional } // Parameter defaults
);
}
}
}

Note the line:

[assembly: WebActivator.PostApplicationStartMethod(typeof($rootnamespace$.AppStart_RegisterRoutesAreasFilters), "Start")]

David added the "PostApplicationStart" option because PreApplicationStart happens too early in the process to register Areas, so for my package, I want things to run just after App_Start. This is all new and under development, so feel free to share with David if you have any thoughts, improvements or strong opinions.

Step 3 - Build a new NuPkg file

From the command line, call...

NuGet pack

...and you'll automatically get a new file, like this screenshot:

Building a new package - Look at all my packages in the explorer window. Cool.

Step 4 - Publish the Update to http://nuget.org (or any NuGet server or file share)

I could log in to my account and upload the file from the browser interface, but since I'm thinking I'll being making changes here and there, I figure it'd be nice to publish from the command line.

I'll grab my API key from the site...

image

..and use it to publish from the command line (using my magic new publish.bat) with contents like these:

nuget push AddMvc3ToWebForms.0.6.nupkg e5c2bbe6-xxxx

...and the result...

C:\AddMvc3ToWebForms>nuget push AddMvc3ToWebForms.0.6.nupkg e5c2bbe6-xxxx
Creating an entry for your package [ID:AddMvc3ToWebForms Ver:0.6]...
Your package was uploaded to the server but not published.
Publishing your package [ID:AddMvc3ToWebForms Ver:0.6] to the live feed...
Your package was published to the feed.

Now I'm set. I've got version 0.6 live now. What's the experience for the user of this library?

Getting an Update to a NuGet Package

There's two ways to find out what NuGet packages my project is using and update them.

Package Manager Console

From the package manager console I can type Get-Package...

PM> Get-Package

Id Version Description
-- ------- -----------
AddMvc3ToWebForms 0.5 A totally unsupported way to quickly add ASP.NET MVC 3 support to your WebForms Application. Works on my machine.

Looks like I have version 0.5. I can update it via...

PM> Update-Package AddMvc3ToWebForms
'WebActivator (≥ 1.1)' not installed. Attempting to retrieve dependency from source...
Done.
Successfully installed 'WebActivator 1.1.0.0'.
Successfully installed 'AddMvc3ToWebForms 0.6'.
Successfully removed 'AddMvc3ToWebForms 0.5' from WebApplication7.
Successfully uninstalled 'AddMvc3ToWebForms 0.5'.
Successfully added 'WebActivator 1.1.0.0' to WebApplication7.
Successfully added 'AddMvc3ToWebForms 0.6' to WebApplication7.

Notice that NuGet automatically removed AddMvc3ToWebForms 0.5 and installed AddMvc3ToWebForms 0.6. It also automatically brought in the dependency on WebActivator 1.1.

Add Library Reference

Alternatively, from Visual Studio right click on the References node in the Solution Explorer and select Add Library Reference (or select the same directly from the Tools menu).

Select Updates from the left side. A list of updates will appear. Click Update.

Updating Packages - Add Library Package Reference

It's all good. Now my AddMvc3ToWebForms NuGet Package can add ASP.NET MVC functionality to an ASP.NET WebForms projects with no additional lines of code. This makes for a nice out of the box experience, especially if I bring in other projects that use the same functionality.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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New Interview Questions for Senior Software Engineers

February 17, '11 Comments [158] Posted in Learning .NET | Programming
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I'm putting together some practice interview questions for a friend who lost his job. I thought it'd be useful to crowd-source some questions from you, Dear Reader.

These questions should be more software design focused, less technical trivia like my previous two lists of interview questions:

UPDATE: I think we all agree (or at least we should) that if you go into an interview tomorrow and you look across the table and the interviewer has simply printed out this list and is reading from it, that you should excuse yourself and run. This isn't a "guide to how to interview" nor is this meant to me a "best practices for engineers" list. It's simply a collective brain-dump of stuff that someone who's been in the business of developing software for money for 10 or so years should have some passing familiarity with. Of course, it's assumed that the interviewer is able to detect BS. This isn't, and shouldn't be, a trivia contest. If you're going to get a job (or you're looking for hire someone for a job) it's ultimately more important to understand if someone can Solve Problems and if Their Head is Screwed on Straight. Take it with a grain of salt, friends, remember, you found it on the Internet. - @shanselman

Here's what I have so far.

  • What is something substantive that you've done to improve as a developer in your career?
  • Would you call yourself a craftsman (craftsperson) and what does that word mean to you?
  • Implement a <basic data structure> using <some language> on <paper|whiteboard|notepad>.
  • What is SOLID?
  • Why is the Single Responsibility Principle important?
  • What is Inversion of Control? How does that relate to dependency injection?
  • How does a 3 tier application differ from a 2 tier one?
  • Why are interfaces important?
  • What is the Repository pattern? The Factory Pattern? Why are patterns important?
  • What are some examples of anti-patterns?
  • Who are the Gang of Four? Why should you care?
  • How do the MVP, MVC, and MVVM patterns relate? When are they appropriate?
  • Explain the concept of Separation of Concerns and it's pros and cons.
  • Name three primary attributes of object-oriented design. Describe what they mean and why they're important.
  • Describe a pattern that is NOT the Factory Pattern? How is it used and when?
  • You have just been put in charge of a legacy code project with maintainability problems. What kind of things would you look to improve to get the project on a stable footing?
  • Show me a portfolio of all the applications you worked on, and tell me how you contributed to design them.
  • What are some alternate ways to store data other than a relational database? Why would you do that, and what are the trade-offs?
  • Explain the concept of convention over configuration, and talk about an example of convention over configuration you have seen in the wild.
  • Explain the differences between stateless and stateful systems, and impacts of state on parallelism.
  • Discuss the differences between Mocks and Stubs/Fakes and where you might use them (answers aren't that important here, just the discussion that would ensue).
  • Discuss the concept of YAGNI and explain something you did recently that adhered to this practice.
  • Explain what is meant by a sandbox, why you would use one, and identify examples of sandboxes in the wild.
  • Concurrency
    • What's the difference between Locking and Lockless (Optimistic and Pessimistic) concurrency models?
    • What kinds of problems can you hit with locking model? And a lockless model?
    • What trade offs do you have for resource contention?
    • How might a task-based model differ from a threaded model?
    • What's the difference between asynchrony and concurrency?
  • Are you still writing code? Do you love it?
  • You've just been assigned to a project in a new technology how would you get started?
  • How does the addition of Service Orientation change systems? When is it appropriate to use?
  • What do you do to stay abreast of the latest technologies and tools?
  • What is the difference between "set" logic, and "procedural" logic. When would you use each one and why?
  • What Source Control systems have you worked with?
  • What is Continuous Integration?  Have you used it and why is it important?
  • Describe a software development life cycle that you've managed.
  • How do you react to people criticizing your code/documents?
  • Whose blogs or podcasts do you follow? Do you blog or podcast?
  • Tell me about some of your hobby projects that you've written in your off time.
  • What is the last programming book you read?
  • Describe, in as much detail as you think is relevant, as deeply as you can, what happens when I type "cnn.com" into a browser and press "Go".
  • Describe the structure and contents of a design document, or a set of design documents, for a multi-tiered web application.
  • What's so great about <cool web technology of the day>?
  • How can you stop your DBA from making off with a list of your users’ passwords?
  • What do you do when you get stuck with a problem you can't solve?
  • If your database was under a lot of strain, what are the first few things you might consider to speed it up?
  • What is SQL injection?
  • What's the difference between unit test and integration test?
  • Tell me about 3 times you failed.
  • What is Refactoring ? Have you used it and it is important? Name three common refactorings.
  • You have two computers, and you want to get data from one to the other. How could you do it?
  • Left to your own devices, what would you create?
  • Given Time, Cost, Client satisfaction and Best Practices, how will you prioritize them for a project you are working on? Explain why.
  • What's the difference between a web server, web farm and web garden? How would your web application need to change for each?
  • What value do daily builds, automated testing, and peer reviews add to a project? What disadvantages are there?
  • What elements of OO design are most prone to abuse? How would you mitigate that?
  • When do you know your code is ready for production?
  • What's YAGNI? Is this list of questions an example?
  • Describe to me some bad code you've read or inherited lately.

Your thoughts? I'll add good questions from the comments throughout the day.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Creating a NuGet Package in 7 easy steps - Plus using NuGet to integrate ASP.NET MVC 3 into existing Web Forms applications

February 15, '11 Comments [33] Posted in ASP.NET | ASP.NET MVC | NuGet | VS2010
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UPDATE: Check out my follow up post where I remove the need for editing the Global.asax.cs and show up to Update and Publish a NuGet package.

Last month I wrote a post called Integrating ASP.NET MVC 3 into existing upgraded ASP.NET 4 Web Forms applications where I showed a very manual and very painful way to add ASP.NET MVC support to an existing ASP.NET WebForms application. You'd then have a lovely hybrid that is both MVC and WebForms.

One of my readers, Yannick said:

This screeaaams NuGet

Indeed it did, er, does. He's saying that this is just the kind of awful boring work that NuGet should make easier. So I did it. Thanks Yannick for just the sassy comment I needed to jump into action.

install-package AddMvc3ToWebForms

First, what I built, then how I built it. I'd like you, Dear Reader, to take a moment and create your own NuGet packages.

Adding ASP.NET MVC to an ASP.NET WebForms project with NuGet

Step 0 - Get NuGet 1.1 by going here. It's like 300k, just take a second.

Step 1 - Open Visual Studio 2010 and make a default ASP.NET (WebForms) Application.

VS2010 Default WebForms App

Step 2 - Right click on References and click Add Library Package Reference. Click Online on the left side, and in the Search box at upper right type in "WebForms" and look for my face. Oh yes. My face. Click Install.

(Alternatively, open the Package Manager Console and type "install-package AddMvc3ToWebForms" and watch the magic. The package is hosted on NuGet.org. You can too!)

Add Library NuGet Dialog

Step 2a - Check out the stuff that's been added to your project.

WebForms app with MVC bits integrated

What's that HookMeUpNow.cs? That's all the routing stuff that I would have needed to edit your Global.asax.cs for. You'll need to add one line of code to Global.asax yourself to make this work now.

Step 3 - Hook up Routes and Everything

Add Mvc3Utilities.RegisterEverything() to your Application_Start. Feel free to rename whatever you like.

Added Mvc3Utilities.RegisterEverything() to the Global.asax

Now run it. You can hit both Default.aspx and /Home/About.

WebForms and MVC together in the same app, shown in the browser

Step 4 - Profit!

Sweet.

How I made my own NuGet package and you should too

Step 0 - Go get the NuGet.exe command line here. Put it in the Path or somewhere.

Step 1 - Make a folder for your new package, go there via the commmand line and run "nuget spec"

C:\Users\Scott\Desktop\AddMvc3ToWebForms>nuget spec
Created 'Package.nuspec' successfully.

C:\Users\Scott\Desktop\AddMvc3ToWebForms>dir Package.nuspec
Directory of C:\Users\Scott\Desktop\AddMvc3ToWebForms

02/15/2011  02:23 AM               813 Package.nuspec
               1 File(s)            813 bytes

Now, I changed this file's name and edited it thusly.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<package xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
<metadata xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/packaging/2010/07/nuspec.xsd">
<id>AddMvc3ToWebForms</id>
<version>0.4</version>
<authors>Scott Hanselman</authors>
<owners>Scott Hanselman</owners>
<iconUrl>http://www.hanselman.com/images/nugeticon.png</iconUrl>
<requireLicenseAcceptance>false</requireLicenseAcceptance>
<description>A totally unsupported way to quickly add ASP.NET MVC 3 support to your WebForms Application. Works on my machine.</description>
<tags>MVC MVC3 ASP.NET WebForms</tags>
</metadata>
</package>

Step 2 - Add stuff to your Content Folder

Since I want my NuGet package to add stuff to folders in my target Web Application, I put whatever I want in a folder called Content. Anything in that will show up in the root of my target project. This can be CSS, JS, CS or VB files, whatever. These files will all get dropped onto the project your package is applied to.

In my project I took the folders from an MVC application and put them in my NuGet folder structure. So, Content, Controllers, Models, Scripts, Views. Copied them right over from an existing blank ASP.NET MVC project.

My NuGet directory where I'm building the package

Step 3 - Decide what needs to be Pre-Processed

However, when my HomeController shows up in your project, Dear Reader, I don't want it to be in the namespace ScottMvcApplication! You want it in MvcApplication54 or whatever your project name is. I need pre-process the source a little to use your project's context, names, namespaces, etc.

For the files I want pre-processed automatically by NuGet, I add a .pp extension. In my example, HomeController.cs.pp.

Preprocessor files with a .pp extension

Then I add a few tokens I want replaced at install-time for that package. For example $rootnamespace$ or $assemblyname$. You can use any Visual Studio Project Property per the NuGet docs.

namespace $rootnamespace$.Controllers
{
public class HomeController : Controller
{
//snip
}
}

Step 4 - Decide what XML elements need to be merged (usually into web.config)

The next preprocessing that is common is adding elements to web.config. This is a nice little feature of NuGet because you just need to make a web.config.transform with the new elements and it will automatically and non-destructively add (and remove) them as needed. Here's my web.config.transform, for reference. Note this is not a full web.config. This is the one I added to my package in the control folder.

<configuration>
<appSettings>
<add key="ClientValidationEnabled" value="true"/>
<add key="UnobtrusiveJavaScriptEnabled" value="true"/>
</appSettings>

<system.web>
<compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0">
<assemblies>
<add assembly="System.Web.Abstractions, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35" />
<add assembly="System.Web.Helpers, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35" />
<add assembly="System.Web.Routing, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35" />
<add assembly="System.Web.Mvc, Version=3.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35" />
<add assembly="System.Web.WebPages, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35" />
</assemblies>
</compilation>
<pages>
<namespaces>
<add namespace="System.Web.Helpers" />
<add namespace="System.Web.Mvc" />
<add namespace="System.Web.Mvc.Ajax" />
<add namespace="System.Web.Mvc.Html" />
<add namespace="System.Web.Routing" />
<add namespace="System.Web.WebPages"/>
</namespaces>
</pages>
</system.web>
<system.webServer>
<validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/>
<modules runAllManagedModulesForAllRequests="true"/>
</system.webServer>

<runtime>
<assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
<dependentAssembly>
<assemblyIdentity name="System.Web.Mvc" publicKeyToken="31bf3856ad364e35" />
<bindingRedirect oldVersion="1.0.0.0-2.0.0.0" newVersion="3.0.0.0" />
</dependentAssembly>
</assemblyBinding>
</runtime>
</configuration>

Step 5 - Add any PowerShell script you might need, especially for adding references

Almost done. Most package won't need much PowerShell, but some do. You can have an install.ps1 and an uninstall.ps1 and do lots of things. These go in a folder called Tools that's next to Content (not inside.)

Here's my install.ps1.

NOTE: Currently today there's no way to STOP the installation of a package while it's happening, so if you try to install mine on NuGet 1.0 I'll just warn you and ask you to uninstall. In the future there will likely be a pre-install or a dependency check. Hence the version check there.

param($installPath, $toolsPath, $package, $project)

if ($host.Version.Major -eq 1 -and $host.Version.Minor -lt 1)
{
"NOTICE: This package only works with NuGet 1.1 or above. Please update your NuGet install at http://nuget.codeplex.com. Sorry, but you're now in a weird state. Please 'uninstall-package AddMvc3ToWebForms' now."
}
else
{
$project.Object.References.Add("Microsoft.CSharp");
$project.Object.References.Add("System.Web.Mvc");
$project.Object.References.Add("Microsoft.Web.Infrastructure");
$project.Object.References.Add("System.Web.WebPages");
$project.Object.References.Add("System.Web.Razor");
$project.Object.References.Add("System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations");
}

Note that in (the future) NuGet 1.2 I won't need this code, I'll just add the references in my NuSpec file directly.

Step 6 - Pack it up

Go back to the command line and run nuget pack

C:\Users\Scott\Desktop\AddMvc3ToWebForms>nuget pack
Attempting to build package from 'AddMvc3ToWebForms.nuspec'.
Successfully created package 'C:\Users\Scott\Desktop\AddMvc3ToWebForms\AddMvc3ToWebForms.0.4.nupkg'.

Step 7 - Submit your package

Next, login to the NuGet Gallery (beta) and Contribute Your Package. Just walk through the wizard and upload the nupkg. You can also get an API Key and use the command line tool to do this automatically, perhaps as part of a build process.

Submitting my app to the NuGet Gallery

That's it. If you've got an open source library or something interesting or useful, get it up on NuGet before your blog commenters shame you into it!

P.S. Yes I didn't count Step 0.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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This Developer's Life 1.1.3 - Competition

February 14, '11 Comments [0] Posted in Podcast
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13-Competition In this episode we talk to competitors who are also programmers. Or, programmers who also compete. Are coders pre-wired for this? Jon Skeet, David Fowler, Aaron Jensen and Danielle Banks share their stories.

Download Here

In this episode we talk to competitors who are also programmers. Or, programmers who also compete. Are coders pre-wired for this?

  • Jon Skeet shares how he stays at the top of the Stack Overflow points pile
  • David Fowler talks about TopCode and flying to DisneyWorld to watch coders code
  • Aaron Jensen quits his job to play poker professionally
  • Daniele R. Banks is just getting started but is already building competing robots

You can download the MP3 here (58 minutes) and visit our site at http://thisdeveloperslife.com.

Please consider subscribing with iTunes, or Zune. Or if you have a BitTorrent client and would like to help save us bandwidth money, as well as the bragging rights of downloading legal torrents via RSS, get our Torrent Feed at ClearBits. Also, please do REVIEW our show on iTunes.

The bandwidth and other costs for this week's show were picked up by SublimeSVN...

sublime

Easy Subversion Management for Windows

...and DevExpress and CodeRush!

DX_Slogan_350

Announcing our listener contest...This Developer's Life - Crowdsourced 1

Oh yes. We want to hear your stories. Record your best developer stories and send them to us and if we think they rock, we'll include them in the next episode of This Developer's Life.

What we need from you:

  • Your story. We don't want interviews, we want stories. Tell us about your passion, or something crazy that happened at work while solving some technical problem.
  • Keep your audio clean. Use a decent microphone or at least make sure you don't "overdrive" your microphone by talking to close or two loudly. Don't record while mowing the lawn and don't record in a giant echo chamber.
  • Be passionate. Talk to us like you're talking to a friend.
  • Don't worry about editing or music. Just share. We'll handle the Lady Gaga mashups.
  • Note we may move your audio around or change the order of stuff to make it more listenable or interesting or both.
  • Change the names of companies and people to protect the innocent (or guilty)
  • Know that by giving us your audio you're releasing it the Creative Commons and that we may or may not use it for a future show.

Send us a link to your audio file and what you're talking about and we'll do the rest. See you next time!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.