Scott Hanselman

How to delete Open or Insecure Wi-Fi HotSpots from Windows 8: Wifi.exe Command Line Utility with Source

June 6, '13 Comments [19] Posted in Open Source | Tools | Win7 | Win8
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For the most part I'm happy with Windows 8 but one feature was removed that makes no sense to me - the wireless networks dialog.

Sure, you can "Forget this network" by right clicking on a Wi-Fi Connection, but only when that network is in range. The old Wireless Networks dialog where you could add and remove networks is gone. Who knows how many saved Wi-Fi hotspot profile I have littering my system?

So, The Problem: I want to remove saved Wi-Fi Profiles whenever I feel like it. I wrote a command line util that will work in Windows 7 and Windows 8.

TL;DR Version

There's a build zipped up of Wifi.exe available here and the source is on GitHub.

UPDATE: I've put Wifi-Manager up on Chocolately so you can now "cinst wifi-manager." Thanks to Brendan Forster for the heavy lifting! Learn more about the Chocolatey package manager here!

Caveats and "Ya I know."

First, let me be clear that I have written a command line utility to replace another command line utility. I get it. I knew it when I did it. Others smarter than I have done similar things and written utilities that match their way of thinking rather than learning an unintuitive syntax. Don't hate the playa, hate the Regular Expression.

Aside: This is also a problem with my iPhone. I likely have 50+ saved Wi-Fi spots on my phone and no way to delete them without jail-breaking.

You can access Wi-Fi profiles with the netsh.exe that comes with Windows, so you could list out profiles like this:

c:\>netsh wlan show profiles

Profiles on interface Wi-Fi:

User profiles
-------------
All User Profile : Wayport_Access
All User Profile : HANSELMAN
All User Profile : HANSELMAN-N
All User Profile : HanselSpot
All User Profile : EliteWifi
All User Profile : Qdoba Free Wifi

Then, for each one, call

c:\>netsh wlan show profile "Qdoba Free Wifi"

Profile Qdoba Free Wifi on interface Wi-Fi:
=======================================================================

Profile information
-------------------
Version : 1
Type : Wireless LAN
Name : Qdoba Free Wifi
Control options :
Connection mode : Connect manually

Connectivity settings
---------------------
Number of SSIDs : 1
SSID name : "Qdoba Free Wifi"
Network type : Infrastructure

For each of these profiles, check if they are secure or open, and if you are connecting manually or automatically. Then, if you wanted, you could netsh wlan delete profile name="Qdoba Free Wifi" and remove a profile, even when it's not near you.

In my recent podcast with security expert Troy Hunt, he pointed out that it's easy to create a fake honeypot Wi-Fi spot that has the same name as a common open network, like Starbucks, for example.

  • Given: If my PC or phone is set up to automatically connect to any open hotspot named "Starbucks" then it will just connect to one...even an evil hotspot.
  • Therefore: it would be nice to automatically delete profiles for Wi-Fi spots that are both open (no security) and set to automatically connect.

I was tired, so I thought I'd bang out a little utility to do this. I could have used PowerShell or something but I felt like using C#. It's exercise.

UPDATE: Lee Holmes went and wrote it in PowerShell! Amazing.

Wifi.exe and it's Usage

Tired of reading? There's a build zipped up of Wifi.exe available here and the source is on GitHub. You may need to Right Click | Properties | Unblock the zip.

There's no warranty. The code sucks and I'm a horrible person and you're running a util you found on my blog. However, it works awesome on my machine. Issues appreciated, tidy PRs appreciated more, running Resharper and doing a PR, less so. I'll update the build if good bugs require it.

If you run Wifi.exe (I put it in my path) you'll see something like this:

c:\>wifi
AP-guest manual WPA2PSK
HANSELMAN-N auto WPA2PSK
HANSELMAN auto WPA2PSK
HanselSpot auto WPA2PSK
Qdoba Free Wifi manual open
Wayport_Access auto open Warning: AUTO connect to OPEN WiFi

Delete WiFi profiles that are OPEN *and* AUTO connect? [y/n]
n

Notice the columns, and the prompt. There's a warning when a hotspot is both open and set to auto-connect. If you answer Y to the prompt, the utility will delete that profile. You can also type 'wifi /deleteautoopen' to bypass the prompt and auto-delete just profiles that are auto and open.

A pull request a few minutes after I pushed this code also added the ability to

wifi delete "HOTSPOTNAME"

which is nice also. Thanks!

The Code

One of the great things about writing command line apps like this is that there's literally a dozen ways to do everything. They are trivial and silly but also useful and used daily. In this case I've got command line argument processing to think about, parsing output from a spawned process, doing the parsing in a clean way, making sure it works on a non-English machine (which I thought about but didn't test), as well as cleaning up of generated temp files.

It's hardly impressive code, but some of it was fun or interesting. Here's a few bits I liked.

Making Columns with Console.WriteLine and String.Format

Did you know that you can right- and left-align columns within a fixed with using String.Format? Few people know about this and I've seen whole libraries written custom to do the work that's built right in.

Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0,-20} {1,10} {2,10} {3,30} ", a.Name, a.ConnectionMode, a.Authentication, warning));

Note the {0,-20} (left aligned) and the {1,10} (right aligned). Those are just like {0} and {1} in a String.Format but they include alignment and width.

Gratuitous use of Linq

It wouldn't be a silly utility without in crazy LINQ, eh? Who needs Regular Expressions when you can when you can do a SQL query over your string? ;) Actually, I don't know if this is a good thing or not. It was fun, though, and it works. Your thoughts?

This takes the output from wlan show profiles (seen above) and parses it into a list of just the AP Names. I think it should work in any language, assuming the : colons are there.

string result = ExecuteNetSh("wlan show profiles");
var listOfProfiles = from line in result.Split(new string[] { "\r\n" }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
where line.Contains(":")
let l = line
where l.Last() != ':'
select l.Split(':')[1].Trim();

foreach (string profile in listOfProfiles)
ExecuteNetSh(String.Format("wlan export profile \"{0}\" folder=\"{1}\"", profile, Environment.CurrentDirectory));

Cleaning up the temp XML files

I export a bunch of very specific XML files with a VERY non-specific extension. I can't control their file name and I don't want guess what their name is because I would need to recreate their AP Name encoding scheme. Instead, I look for any XML files in the current folder (given the rare chance that YOU, the utility runner, have XML files in the same folder already) and only delete the ones with the namespace that I know to be present in Wi-Fi profiles. I patted myself on the back for this one, but just lightly.

static XNamespace ns = "http://www.microsoft.com/networking/WLAN/profile/v1";

//Delete the exported profiles we made, making sure they are what we think they are!
foreach (string file in Directory.EnumerateFiles(Environment.CurrentDirectory, "*.xml"))
if (XElement.Load(file).Name.Namespace == ns)
File.Delete(file);

Capturing Command Line Output

Finally, here's how you get the output of a command line process you started:

Process p = new Process();
p.StartInfo.FileName = "netsh.exe";
p.StartInfo.Arguments = arguments ?? String.Empty;
p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
p.Start();

string output = p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
return output;

Pretty basic, but useful to bookmark.

Alternatives

After I wrote this I noticed there are some WinForms utilities to do this. That's great. I wouldn't mind making may own, except I'd want it to look exactly like the Windows 7 dialog. It'd be fun just to see if I could get it pixel perfect.

Feel free to go check out the code, play with it and make fun of me. https://github.com/shanselman/Windows-Wifi-Manager


Get Involved! Check out my latest production with TekPub. A meticulously edited TWO HOURS of video content where we cover everything we think a developer should know to "Get Involved" in the developer community.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Announcing "Get Involved" from Tekpub - Enhance your career by engaging with your peers

June 6, '13 Comments [15] Posted in Musings | Open Source
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Get Involved - The Video

My friend Rob Conery and I work on the This Developer's Life podcast together. You should check it out, we work well together. Last year we created a Technical Speaking Tips Video and launched http://speakinghacks.com on Rob's TekPub site. 

Get Involved!Since then I've done a little more moonlighting on the side with Rob and release not just The Art of Speaking but also done other episodes with Rob including a regular show called "The Source" where we explore the source of popular open source frameworks. Again, you get all of this with a yearly or monthly subscription.

Today we're launched our most ambitious project yet. A meticulously edited episode that's almost TWO HOURS of video content where we cover everything we think a developer should know to "Get Involved" in the developer community.

Announcing "Get Involved"

If you're a fan of This Developer's Life you know how tightly we like to produce things - this video is no exception. Filmed on the streets of Portland and at a Portland user group, we talk about Blogging, Twitter, Github, StackOverflow, Open Source, Speaking, User Groups and Conferences - all of this hoping to make you a happier, more productive, more connected developer. We want to inspire you and perhaps to take your career to the next level.

Additionally, we stretched far beyond Portland to seek out the other people who are very active and well known in the social arena like Jon Skeet and Jeff Atwood:

  • Jeff Atwood and I talk about blogging, writing, and "working your voice free" so people who read your posts hear you loud and clear.
  • Jon Skeet joins us to talk about what a Good Question is on StackOverflow - and also how you can gain reputation by providing Good Answers - and edits to Good Questions!
  • We venture out to the Portland Area DotNet Users Group (PADNUG) and meet a few developers who have just started going - as well as people who have been there for years.
  • While we were there, I gave a 10-minute lightning talk on Azure - a great way to get started speaking if you're not a fan of public speaking. Rob filmed the whole thing.

We put an immense amount of work into this production and I really think you'll enjoy it. You can buy it "ala carte" or as with all Tekpub productions you can get a one year subscription and get access to everything on Tekpub including this video, my speaking video, my show The Source as well as my episodes of Full Throttle with Rob PLUS dozens of other videos on new tech like Backbone, Async C# 5.0 with Jon Skeet, ASP.NET MVC with Sam Saffron, RavenDB with Ayende Rahien, Mastering jQuery, and on and on.

I hope you enjoy this show. We poured our hearts into it.

P.S. Here's a 10% discount coupon if you only want the video alone: KQWFCJUE0SPO

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Blocking Image Hotlinking, Leeching and Evil Sploggers with IIS Url Rewrite

June 3, '13 Comments [60] Posted in IIS
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I recently discovered that a blog called (seriously) "Google Chrome Browser" was reblogging my site. (It of course has NO relationship to Google or the lovely folks on the Chrome team.)

This is a splog or "spam blog." It's less of a blog and more of a 'suck your feed in and reblog it.' Basically every post is duplicated or sucked in via RSS from somewhere else.  I get this many times a week and have for years.

However, this particular site started showing up ahead of mine in searches and that's not cool.

You evil bastards.

Worse yet, they have almost 25k followers on Twitter. I've asked them a few times to stop doing this, but this time I got tired of it.

They're even 'hotlinking' my images, which means that all my PNGs are still hosted on my site. When you visit their site, the text is from my RSS but I pay for the images bandwidth. The irony of this is thick. Not to mention my copyright notice is intact on their site. ;)

When an image is linked to from another domain the HTTP_REFERER header is populated with the location that the image is linked from. That means when my web server gets a request for 'foo.png' from the Google Chrome Browser blog I can see the page that asked for that image.

For example:

Request URL:http://www.hanselman.com/blog/content/binary/Windows-Live-Writer/How-to-run-a-Virtual-Conference-for-10_E53C/image_5.png
Request Method:GET
Referer:http://google-chrome-browser.com/penny-pinching-cloud-how-run-two-day-virtual-conference-10

Because this differentiates the GET request that means I can do something about it. This brings up a few important things to remember in general about the web that I feel a lot of programmers forget about:

That said, I want to detect these requests and serve a different image.

If I was using Apache and had an .htaccess file, I might do this:

RewriteCond %{HTTP:Referer} ^.*http://(?:www\.)?computersblogsexample.info.*$
RewriteHeader Referer: .* damn\.spammers

RewriteCond %{HTTP:Referer} ^.*http://(?:www\.)?google-chrome-browser.*$
RewriteHeader Referer: .* damn\.spammers

#make more of these for each evil spammer

RewriteCond %{HTTP:Referer} ^.*damn\.spammers.*$
RewriteRule ^.*\.(?:gif|jpg|png)$ /images/splog.png [NC,L]

Since I'm using IIS, I'll do similar rewrites in my web.config. I could do a whitelist where I only allow hotlinking from a few places, or a blacklist where I only block a few folks. Here's a blacklist.

<system.webServer>
<rewrite>
<rules>
<rule name="Blacklist block" stopProcessing="true">
<match url="(?:jpg|jpeg|png|gif|bmp)$" />
<conditions>
<add input="{HTTP_REFERER}" pattern="^https?://(.+?)/.*$" />
<add input="{DomainsBlackList:{C:1}}" pattern="^block$" />
<add input="{REQUEST_FILENAME}" pattern="splog.png" negate="true" />
</conditions>
<action type="Redirect" url="http://www.hanselman.com/images/splog.png" appendQueryString="false" redirectType="Temporary"/>
</rule>
</rules>
<rewriteMaps>
<rewriteMap name="DomainsBlackList" defaultValue="allow">
<add key="google-chrome-browser.com" value="block" />
<add key="www.verybadguy.com" value="block" />
<add key="www.superbadguy.com" value="block" />
</rewriteMap>
</rewriteMaps>
</rewrite>
</system.webServer>

I could have just made a single rule and put this bad domain in it but it would have only worked for one domain, so instead my buddy Ruslan suggested that I make a rewritemap and refer to it from the rule. This way I can add more domains to block as the evil spreads.

It was important to exclude the splog.png file that I am going to redirect the bad guy to, otherwise I'll get into a redirect loop where I redirect requests for the splog.png back to itself!

The result is effective. If you visit their site, I'll issue an HTTP 307 (Moved Temporarily) and then you'll see my splog.png image everywhere that they've hotlinked my image.

Not cool, splogger, not cool.

If you wanted to change the blacklist to a white list, you'd reverse the values of allow and block in the rewrite map:

<rewriteMaps>
<rewriteMap name="DomainsBlackList" defaultValue="block">
<add key="google-chrome-browser.com" value="allow" />
<add key="www.verybadguy.com" value="allow" />
<add key="www.superbadguy.com" value="allow" />
</rewriteMap>
</rewriteMaps>

Nice, simple and clean. I don't plan on playing "whac a mole" with sploggers as it's a losing game, but I will bring down the ban-hammer on particularly obnoxious examples of content theft, especially when they mess with my Google Juice.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselman's Newsletter of Wonderful Things: May 13th, 2013

June 3, '13 Comments [4] Posted in Newsletter
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I have a "whenever I get around to doing it" Newsletter of Wonderful Things. Why a newsletter? I dunno. It seems more personal somehow. Fight me.

You can view all the previous newsletters here. You can sign up here Newsletter of Wonderful Things or just wait and get them later on the blog, which hopefully you have subscribed to. Email folks get it first!

Here's the newsletter that I sent out May 13th.


Hi Interfriends,

Thanks again for signing up for this experiment. Here's some interesting things I've come upon this week. If you forwarded this (or if it was forwarded to you) a reminder: You can sign up at http://hanselman.com/newsletter and the archive of all previous Newsletters is here.

Remember, you get the newsletter here first. This one will be posted to the blog as an archive in a few weeks.

Scott Hanselman

(BTW, since you *love* email you can subscribe to my blog via email here: http://feeds.hanselman.com/ScottHanselman DO IT!)

P.P.S. You know you can forward this to your friends, right?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Is the Windows user ready for apt-get?

May 28, '13 Comments [88] Posted in NuGet | Open Source | Tools
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Chocolatey installs Git

What it does

Chocolatey lets you install Windows applications quickly from the command line via a central catalog of installation scripts. You could install Git, 7Zip or even Microsoft Office (given a key.) The idea is seamless and quiet installations using a well-known key.

For example, once installed you can do this from and command line:

  • cinst git
  • cinst 7zip
  • cinst ruby
  • cinst vlc

That's basically it.

The catalog has grown so complete, in fact, that I recently wanted to install DosBox so I could play Zork. I took and chance and just "cinst dosbox" and it worked. THAT is a the promise that Chocolatey makes.

Getting Started with Chocolatey

You can get started by first installing the Chocolatey package manager. Copy paste this line to your command line and run it. (More on the fearfulness of this first step in a moment).

@powershell -NoProfile -ExecutionPolicy unrestricted -Command "iex ((new-object net.webclient).DownloadString('https://chocolatey.org/install.ps1'))" && SET PATH=%PATH%;%systemdrive%\chocolatey\bin

Presumably you like to know what command line stuff is going to do to your computer before you do it, so parse this line out. It's going to launch PowerShell to do the hard work. Nearly every Windows machine has PowerShell these days, and it's PowerShell that makes Chocolatey work.

Some folks have custom profiles so the -NoProfile switch suppresses custom profiles to prevent conflicts during installation. It launches a chunk of PowerShell script that it downloads from https://chocolatey.org/install.ps1/ then executes. Note that it's setting execution policy to unrestricted to do this. To be clear, it's executing code downloaded over the web, so there is a non-zero risk there. It then adds Chocolatey to your path (for this one prompt) so you can use it immediately. It'll be added to future instances of prompts automatically.

Look at https://chocolatey.org/install.ps1 now. It's a very clean and easy to read script. It downloads the Chocolatey installation zip file (which is actually a NuGet package), unzips it and continues the installation by running a scripts in the tools section of the package.

How it works

Chocolatey is a bootstrapper that uses PowerShell scripts and the NuGet packaging format to install apps for you. NuGet is the package management system that Windows Developers use to bring libraries down at the project level. Chocolatey (get it? Chocolatey Nu-Get?) extends that concept to bring applications down at the system level.

Today if you want to get 7Zip, you usually google for it, find the site, figure out the latest version or right version for your system, download it, run it, next next next finish and maybe add it to your path. Chocolatey does that for you.

Again, NuGet is libraries installed locally for projects, Chocolatey is applications installed globally for your whole system.

Chocolatey uses PowerShell scripts (that you never have to think about) that package developers use to chain installations and build dependency trees. Take the internals of a Git installation script for example:

try {
Install-ChocolateyPackage 'git.install' 'exe' '/VERYSILENT' 'http://msysgit.googlecode.com/files/Git-1.8.1.2-preview20130201.exe'

#------- ADDITIONAL SETUP -------#
$is64bit = (Get-WmiObject Win32_Processor).AddressWidth -eq 64
$programFiles = $env:programfiles
if ($is64bit) {$programFiles = ${env:ProgramFiles(x86)}}
$gitPath = Join-Path $programFiles 'Git\cmd'

Install-ChocolateyPath $gitPath 'user'

@"

Making GIT core.autocrlf false
"@ | Write-Host

#make GIT core.autocrlf false
& "$env:comspec" '/c git config --global core.autocrlf false'

Write-ChocolateySuccess 'git.install'
} catch {
Write-ChocolateyFailure 'git.install' $($_.Exception.Message)
throw
}

The most important part for you to take away here is the first line. Note that this Chocolatey script is downloading Git from the mSysGit Site. Chocolatey is not changing installers, making installers or hosting installers. It's automating the boring parts of getting software, but it's still getting that software from the same location as always.

Advanced Stuff

Once you learn the basics - and they're pretty basic - there's more depth to Chocolatey to explore. Beyond the cinst and cuninst there's other commands to make installing stuff on Windows easier. Remember, they're all in your PATH so you can call these commands anytime.

Each of these major sources can be called with cinst using the -source parameter like "cinst IISExpress - source WebPI" or using their own aliases for simplicity as shown below.

  • cwindowsfeatures - If you've ever opened Add/Remove programs then click Install Windows Features in order to setup IIS or Hyper-V then this command is for you. Some examples:
    • cwindowsfeatures  IIS-WebServerRole
    • cwindowsfeatures Microsoft-Hyper-V-All
    • cwindowsfeatures TelnetClient
      • Plus, you can always clist -source windowsfeatures for the complete list.
  • cwebpi - The Web Platform Installer is a great GUI for downloading any development tools you might need for Web Development on Windows. It's a catalog, an installer, and a chainer. There's also a command-line version of WebPI that Chocolatey integrates with so you can:
    • cwebpi IISExpress
    • cwebpi VWDOrVs11AzurePack_2_0
      • And again, clist -source webpi gets you a list of what you can do.

There's a more complete list at the Chocolatey Commands Reference including how it integrates with Cygwin, Gems and Python.

Security Issues

nugetlogoThis is a prickly one. How do you make a system that lets you install anything directly from the Internet quickly, cleanly, and easily without, well, installing something evil directly from the Internet? You'll want the communication with the server to be secure and the packages trusted, but you'll also want to make sure the packages haven't been tampered with since they were uploaded. There's the inevitable threat of a man-in-the-middle attack. You'll want to watch for malicious packages and enable quick takedowns if one sneaks by.

Security concerns aren't unique to Chocolatey, of course. They are a part of package repositories since their inception. The node npm repository had a security breach in March of 2012, and the folks at andyet explored the issues surrounding it, but also pointed out that personal responsibility has to have a role as well.

Linux's apt-get solves much of this with appropriate uses of cryptography and best practices that can (and should) be emulated. Packages in apt repos are signed with SecureApp, there are warnings if you're using a 3rd party repo or installing an unsigned package.

The Chocolatey team has been very quick to jump on security issues and they are very approachable. They've added SSL where appropriate and are aware of the work to come. If Chocolatey gets big (bandwidth and costs is a question in my mind) perhaps a non-profit organization would step in to help with not only costs, but also security audits and best practices.

Here's some points (edited for length by me) from a post from Chocolatey's lead, Rob in a post on their mailing list, also in march of 2012:

Security has a big future aspect of chocolatey. At the present I am the curator and I every day I get an email showing me all of the new packages that went in the day before. I look at all packages from new authors and I typically look at the first version of most new packages from authors I have good contacts with.

I've talked at length with others about having a moderated feed in the aspect of every package, every new version would be approved prior to showing up on the main feed. I am paying attention to how debian does things with multiple feeds and there are thoughts to move in that direction as well.

Security? In the future we are looking at a small group of folks be an approving body for nupkgs. We also talked about showing the hash for the nupkg, and possibly letting folks specify a hash for the installers so chocolatey can verify the things it downloads prior to execution.

Chocolatey's LIB folderCould I make a Chocolatey package called "FormatMyHardDrive?" Sure I could, just like I could ask you to open an admin prompt and format c: /q, but you won't, right? ;)

What's next?

Chocolatey is clearly not meant to be used by your "Gender Non-Specific Non-Technical Parent" and it does have some "competition" in the form of the Ninite GUI installation utility. While still not for the average Joe/Jane and having only a limited catalog, Ninite does fill a gap for the super-user to quickly get the common apps and utilities they want.

Additionally, is Chocolatey really apt-get? It's not installing libraries system-wide, although there's no reason it couldn't. Other open source projects like CoApp would like to be the Windows app-get although CoApp is more of a "system-wide libraries, C++ support, and Unix-like utilities" and Chocolatey is more of a "developer and poweruser utilities and their dependencies."

Chocolatey does install dependencies and you can see that happen yourself by trying out "cinst gitextensions" which itself has a dependency on git. Chocolatey will walk the graph and install what it needs before finally installing gitextensions.

Where Chocolatey, and ultimately Windows itself, falls down is with odd PATHing and install locations. Because Windows doesn't have formal install locations for things and because Chocolatey puts itself first in the PATH, it's possible to get one's self into odd situations where apps that were installed outside of Chocolatey don't line up with apps installed inside. For example, I installed Git with Chocolatey some months ago, then forgot about that version and installed a newer version of Git on my own. However, I kept hitting an old git bug because the Chocolatey version of Git was "first." I believe issues like this have changed with recent builds of Chocolatey, but the point remains: it's hard on Windows today to who installed what low-level utility, when, and where it ended up.

Branding

Now, by no means to I want to take away from the hard work done by Rob and the team, but (and I've said this to Rob before) I really have trouble getting past the name Chocolatey. Sure, there are two ways to spell "Chocolaty," which make it hard at least for me to type "Chocolatey" reliably. The -ey is a theoretically a valid variant spelling, but you can tell that that to the red squiggled underline in Word. But it's less the spelling and more the name itself. It lacks the nerdiness of an "npm," the gravitas of an "apt-get," or the poetic terseness of a "gem."  I realize that we are living in a world with companies called Hulu, Yahoo, Microsoft (seriously, MICRO SOFT, what is that?) and Google, but it's worth pointing out that a good name can really take a project to the next level. I'm not sure Chocolatey is the right name for this project, but that's 100% my opinion.

I encourage you, technical reader, to check out Chocolatey for yourself! It's a powerful tool, an engaged and growing community and an interesting piece of tech in its own right.

Is Chocolatey the apt-get Windows users have been waiting for? Sound off in the comments.


Sponsor: Big thanks to SoftFluent for sponsoring the feed this week! Check out their slick code generation tools: Less Plumbing, More Productivity! Generate rock-solid foundations for your .NET applications from Visual Studio and focus on what matters!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.