Scott Hanselman

Azure Cloud Shell - your own bash shell and container - right inside Visual Studio Code

December 3, '17 Comments [8] Posted in Azure
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Visual Studio Code has a HUGE extension library. There's also almost two dozen very nice Azure specific extensions as well as extensions for Docker, etc. If you write an Azure extension yourself, you can depend on the Azure Account Extension to handle the administrivia of the user logging into Azure and selecting their subscription. And of course, the Azure Account Extension is open source.

Here's the cool part - I think, since I just learned it. You can have the Azure Account Extension installed (again, you can install it directly or you can get it as a dependency) you also get the ability to get an Azure Cloud Shell directly inside VS Code. That means a little container spins up in the Cloud and you can get a real bash shell or a real PowerShell shell quickly. AND the Azure Cloud Shell automatically is logged in as you and already has a ton of tools pre-installed.

Here's how you do it.

VS Code Command Palette

It will pop up a message with a "copy & open" button. It'll launch a browser, then you enter a special code after logging into Azure to OAuth VS Code into your Account account.

image

At this point, open a Cloud Shell with Shift-Ctrl-P and type "Bash" or "PowerShell"...it'll autocomplete so you can type a lot less, or setup a hotkey.

Your Cloud Shell will appear along side your local terminals!

Azure Cloud Shell in VS Code

Note that there's a "clouddrive" folder mapped to your Azure Storage so you can keep stuff in there. Even though the Shell goes away in about 20 min of non-use, your stuff (scripts, whatever) is persisted.

image

There's a bunch of tools preinstalled you can use as well!

scott@Azure:~$ node --version
v6.9.4
scott@Azure:~$ dotnet --version
2.0.0
scott@Azure:~$ git --version
git version 2.7.4
scott@Azure:~$ python --version
Python 3.5.2
scott@Azure:~$ lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Ubuntu
Description: Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS
Release: 16.04
Codename: xenial

And finally, when you type "azure" or "az" for the various Azure CLI (Command Line Interface) tools, you'll find you're already authenticated/logged into Azure, so you can create VMs, list websites, manage Kubenetes clusters, all from within VS Code. I'm still exploring, but I'm enjoying what I'm seeing.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to download embedded videos with F12 Tools in your browser

November 29, '17 Comments [17] Posted in Tools
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I got an email this week asking how to download some of my Azure Friday video podcast videos from http://friday.azure.com as well as some of the Getting Started Videos from Azure.com.

NOTE: Respect copyright and consider what you’re doing and WHY before you use this technique to download videos that may have been embedded for a reason.

I told them to download the videos with F12 tools, and they weren't clear how. I'll use an Azure Friday video for the example. Do be aware that there are a ton of ways to embed video on the web and this doesn't get around ones that REALLY don't want to be downloaded. This won't help you with Netflix, Hulu, etc.

First, I'll visit the site with the video I want in my browser. I'll use Chrome but this also works in Edge or Firefox with slightly different menus.

Then press F12 to bring up the Developer Tools pane and click Network. In Edge, click Content Type, then Media.

Download embedded videos with F12

Click the "clear" button to set up your workspace. That's the International No button there in the Network pane. Now, press Play and get ready.

Look in the Media list for something like ".mp4" or something that looks like the video you want. It'll likely have an HTTP Response in the 20x range.

Download 200

In Chrome, right click on the URL and select Copy as CURL. If you're on Windows pick cmd.exe and bash if you're on Linux/Mac.

Downloading with CURL

You'll get a crazy long command put into your clipboard. It's not all needed but it's a very convenient feature the browser provides, so it's worth using.

Get Curl: If you don't have the "curl" command you'll want to download "curl.exe" from here https://curl.haxx.se/dlwiz/ and, if you like, put it in your PATH. If you have Windows, get the free bundled curl version with installer here.

Open a terminal/command prompt - run cmd.exe on Windows - and paste in the command. If the browser you're using only gives you the URL and not the complete "curl" command, the command you're trying to build is basically curl [url] -o [outputfile.mp4]. It's best if you can get the complete command like the one Chrome provides, as it may include authentication cookies or other headers that omitting may prevent your download from working.

GOTCHA: Make sure to remove the -H "Range:" headers (if any) to ensure you get the FULL download and not just a range of bytes!

image

BEFORE you press enter, make sure you add "-o youroutputfilename.mp4." Also, if you can an error about security and certificates, you may need to add "--insecure."

Downloading a streaming video file with CURL

In the screenshot above I'm saving the file as "test.mp4" on my desktop.

There are several ways to download embedded videos, including a number of online utilities that come and go, but this technique has been very reliable for me.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Writing smarter cross-platform .NET Core apps with the API Analyzer and Windows Compatibility Pack

November 25, '17 Comments [12] Posted in DotNetCore
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.NET Core is Open Source and Cross PlatformThere's a couple of great utilities that have come out in the last few weeks in the .NET Core world that you should be aware of. They are deeply useful when porting/writing cross-platform code.

.NET API Analyzer

First is the API Analyzer. As you know, APIs sometimes get deprecated, or you'll use a method on Windows and find it doesn't work on Linux. The API Analyzer is a Roslyn (remember Roslyn is the name of the C#/.NET compiler) analyzer that's easily added to your project as a NuGet package. All you have to do is add it and you'll immediately start getting warnings and/or squiggles calling out APIs that might be a problem.

Check out this quick example. I'll make a quick console app, then add the analyzer. Note the version is current as of the time of this post. It'll change.

C:\supercrossplatapp> dotnet new console
C:\supercrossplatapp> dotnet add package Microsoft.DotNet.Analyzers.Compatibility --version 0.1.2-alpha

Then I'll use an API that only works on Windows. However, I still want my app to run everywhere.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
Console.WriteLine("Hello World!");

if (RuntimeInformation.IsOSPlatform(OSPlatform.Windows))
{
var w = Console.WindowWidth;
Console.WriteLine($"Console Width is {w}");
}
}

Then I'll "dotnet build" (or run, which implies build) and I get a nice warning that one API doesn't work everywhere.

C:\supercrossplatapp> dotnet build

Program.cs(14,33): warning PC001: Console.WindowWidth isn't supported on Linux, MacOSX [C:\Users\scott\Desktop\supercr
ossplatapp\supercrossplatapp.csproj]
supercrossplatapp -> C:\supercrossplatapp\bin\Debug\netcoreapp2.0\supercrossplatapp.dll

Build succeeded.

Olia from the .NET Team did a great YouTube video where she shows off the API Analyzer and how it works. The code for the API Analyzer up here on GitHub. Please leave an issue if you find one!

Windows Compatibility Pack for .NET Core

Second, the Windows Compatibility Pack for .NET Core is a nice piece of tech. When .NET Core 2.0 come out and the .NET Standard 2.0 was finalized, it included over 32k APIs that made it extremely compatible with existing .NET Framework code. In fact, it's so compatible, I was able to easily take a 15 year old .NET app and port it over to .NET Core 2.0 without any trouble at all.

They have more than doubled the set of available APIs from 13k in .NET Standard 1.6 to 32k in .NET Standard 2.0.

.NET Standard 2.0 is cool because it's supported on the following platforms:

  • .NET Framework 4.6.1
  • .NET Core 2.0
  • Mono 5.4
  • Xamarin.iOS 10.14
  • Xamarin.Mac 3.8
  • Xamarin.Android 7.5

When you're porting code over to .NET Core that has lots of Windows-specific dependencies, you might find yourself bumping into APIs that aren't a part of .NET Standard 2.0. So, there's a new (preview) Microsoft.Windows.Compatibility NuGet package that "provides access to APIs that were previously available only for .NET Framework."

There will be two kinds of APIs in the Compatibility Pack. APIs that were a part of Windows originally but can work cross-platform, and APIs that will always be Windows only, because they are super OS-specific. APIs calls to the Windows Registry will always be Windows-specific, for example. But the System.DirectoryServices or System.Drawing APIs could be written in a way that works anywhere. The Windows Compatibility Pack adds over 20,000 more APIs, on top of what's already available in .NET Core. Check out the great video that Immo shot on the compat pack.

The point is, if the API that is blocking you from using .NET Core is now available in this compat pack, yay! But you should also know WHY you are pointing to .NET Core. Work continues on both .NET Core and .NET (Full) Framework on Windows. If your app works great today, there's no need to port unless you need a .NET Core specific feature. Here's a great list of rules of thumb from the docs:

Use .NET Core for your server application when:+

  • You have cross-platform needs.
  • You are targeting microservices.
  • You are using Docker containers.
  • You need high-performance and scalable systems.
  • You need side-by-side .NET versions per application.

Use .NET Framework for your server application when:

  • Your app currently uses .NET Framework (recommendation is to extend instead of migrating).
  • Your app uses third-party .NET libraries or NuGet packages not available for .NET Core.
  • Your app uses .NET technologies that aren't available for .NET Core.
  • Your app uses a platform that doesn’t support .NET Core.

Finally, it's worth pointing out a few other tools that can aid you in using the right APIs for the job.

Enjoy!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Trying out new .NET Core Alpine Docker Images

November 22, '17 Comments [20] Posted in Docker | DotNetCore | Open Source
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Docker ContainersI blogged recently about optimizing .NET and ASP.NET Docker files sizes. .NET Core 2.0 has previously been built on a Debian image but today there is preview image with .NET Core 2.1 nightlies using Alpine. You can read about the announcement here about this new Alpine preview image. There's also a good rollup post on .NET and Docker.

They have added two new images:

  • 2.1-runtime-alpine
  • 2.1-runtime-deps-alpine

Alpine support is part of the .NET Core 2.1 release. .NET Core 2.1 images are currently provided at the microsoft/dotnet-nightly repo, including the new Alpine images. .NET Core 2.1 images will be promoted to the microsoft/dotnet repo when released in 2018.

NOTE: The -runtime-deps- image contains the dependancies needed for a .NET Core application, but NOT the .NET Core runtime itself. This is the image you'd use if your app was a self-contained application that included a copy of the .NET Core runtime. This is apps published with -r [runtimeid]. Most folks will use the -runtime- image that included the full .NET Core runtime. To be clear:

- The runtime image contains the .NET Core runtime and is intended to run Framework-Dependent Deployed applications - see sample

- The runtime-deps image contains just the native dependencies needed by .NET Core and is intended to run Self-Contained Deployed applications - see sample

It's best with .NET Core to use multi-stage build files, so you have one container that builds your app and one that contains the results of that build. That way you don't end up shipping an image with a bunch of SDKs and compilers you don't need.

NOTE: Read this to learn more about image versions in Dockerfiles so you can pick the right tag and digest for your needs. Ideally you'll pick a docker file that rolls forward to include the latest servicing patches.

Given this docker file, we build with the SDK image, then publish, and the result is about 219megs.

FROM microsoft/dotnet:2.0-sdk as builder  

RUN mkdir -p /root/src/app/dockertest
WORKDIR /root/src/app/dockertest

COPY dockertest.csproj .
RUN dotnet restore ./dockertest.csproj

COPY . .
RUN dotnet publish -c release -o published

FROM microsoft/dotnet:2.0.0-runtime

WORKDIR /root/
COPY --from=builder /root/src/app/dockertest/published .
ENV ASPNETCORE_URLS=http://+:5000
EXPOSE 5000/tcp
CMD ["dotnet", "./dockertest.dll"]

Then I'll save this as Dockerfile.debian and build like this:

> docker build . -t shanselman/dockertestdeb:0.1 -f dockerfile.debian

With a standard ASP.NET app this image ends up being 219 megs.

Now I'll just change one line, and use the 2.1 alpine runtime

FROM microsoft/dotnet-nightly:2.1-runtime-alpine

And build like this:

> docker build . -t shanselman/dockertestalp:0.1 -f dockerfile.alpine

and compare the two:

> docker images | find /i "dockertest"
shanselman/dockertestalp 0.1 3f2595a6833d 16 minutes ago 82.8MB
shanselman/dockertestdeb 0.1 0d62455c4944 30 minutes ago 219MB

Nice. About 83 megs now rather than 219 megs for a Hello World web app. Now the idea of a microservice is more feasible!

Please do head over to the GitHub issue here https://github.com/dotnet/dotnet-docker-nightly/issues/500 and offer your thoughts and results as you test these Alpine images. Also, are you interested in a "-debian-slim?" It would be halfway to Alpine but not as heavy as just -debian.

Lots of great stuff happening around .NET and Docker. Be sure to also check out Jeff Fritz's post on creating a minimal ASP.NET Core Windows Container to see how you can squish .(full) Framework applications running on Windows containers as well. For example, the Windows Nano Server images are just 93 megs compressed.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Docker and Linux Containers on Windows, with or without Hyper-V Virtual Machines

November 20, '17 Comments [38] Posted in Docker | Win10
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Containers are lovely, in case you haven't heard. They are a nice and clean way to get a reliable and guaranteed deployment, no matter the host system.

If I want to run my my ASP.NET Core application, I can just type "docker run -p 5000:80 shanselman/demos" at the command line, and it'll start up! I don't have any concerns that it won't run. It'll run, and run well.

Some containers naysayers say , sure, we could do the same thing with Virtual Machines, but even today, a VHD (virtual hard drive) is rather an unruly thing and includes a ton of overhead that a container doesn't have. Containers are happening and you should be looking hard at them for your deployments.

docker run shanselman/demos

Historically on Windows, however, Linux Containers run inside a Hyper-V virtual machine. This can be a good thing or a bad thing, depending on what your goals are. Running Containers inside a VM gives you significant isolation with some overhead. This is nice for Servers but less so for my laptop. Docker for Windows hides the VM for the most part, but it's there. Your Container runs inside a Linux VM that runs within Hyper-V on Windows proper.

HyperV on Windows

With the latest version of Windows 10 (or 10 Server) and the beta of Docker for Windows, there's native Linux Container support on Windows. That means there's no Virtual Machine or Hyper-V involved (unless you want), so Linux Containers run on Windows itself using Windows 10's built in container support.

For now you have to switch "modes" between Hyper V and native Containers, and you can't (yet) run Linux and Windows Containers side by side. The word on the street is that this is just a point in time thing, and that Docker will at some point support running Linux and Windows Containers in parallel. That's pretty sweet because it opens up all kinds of cool hybrid scenarios. I could run a Windows Server container with an .NET Framework ASP.NET app that talks to a Linux Container running Redis or Postgres. I could then put them all up into Kubernetes in Azure, for example.

Once I've turned Linux Containers on Windows on within Docker, everything just works and has one less moving part.

Linux Containers on Docker

I can easily and quickly run busybox or real Ubuntu (although Windows 10 already supports Ubuntu natively with WSL):

docker run -ti busybox sh

More useful even is to run the Azure Command Line with no install! Just "docker run -it microsoft/azure-cli" and it's running in a Linux Container.

Azure CLI in a Container

I can even run nyancat! (Thanks Thomas!)

docker run -it supertest2014/nyan

nyancat!

Speculating - I look forward to the day I can run "minikube start --vm-driver="windows" (or something) and easily set up a Kubernetes development system locally using Windows native Linux Container support rather than using Hyper-V Virtual Machines, if I choose to.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.