Scott Hanselman

Dotnet Depends is a great text mode development utility made with Gui.cs

August 1, '19 Comments [10] Posted in DotNetCore | Open Source
Sponsored By

I love me some text mode. ASCII, ANSI, VT100. Keep your 3D accelerated ray traced graphics and give me a lovely emoji-based progress bar.

Miguel has a nice thing called Gui.cs and I bumped into it in an unexpected and lovely place. There are hundreds of great .NET Global Tools that you can install to make your development lifecycle smoother, and I was installing Martin Björkström's lovely "dotnet depends" tool (go give him a GitHub star now!)  like this:

dotnet tool install -g dotnet-depends

Then I headed over to my Windows Terminal (get it free in the Store) and ran "dotnet depends" on my main website's code and was greeted by this (don't sweat the line spacing, that's a Terminal bug that'll be fixed soon):

dotnet depends in the Windows Terminal

How nice is this! It's a fully featured dependency explorer but it's all in text mode and doesn't require me to use the mouse and take my hands of the keyboard. If I'm already deep into the terminal/text mode, this is a great example of a solid, useful tool.

But how hard was it to make? Surprisingly little as his code is very simple. This is a testament to how he used the API and how Miguel designed it. He's separated the UI and the Business Logic, of course. He does the analysis work and stores it in a graph variable.

Here they're setting up some panes for the (text mode) Windows:

Application.Init();

var top = new CustomWindow();

var left = new FrameView("Dependencies")
{
Width = Dim.Percent(50),
Height = Dim.Fill(1)
};
var right = new View()
{
X = Pos.Right(left),
Width = Dim.Fill(),
Height = Dim.Fill(1)
};

It's split in half at this point, with the left side staying  at 50%.

var orderedDependencyList = graph.Nodes.OrderBy(x => x.Id).ToImmutableList();
var dependenciesView = new ListView(orderedDependencyList)
{
CanFocus = true,
AllowsMarking = false
};
left.Add(dependenciesView);
var runtimeDependsView = new ListView(Array.Empty<Node>())
{
CanFocus = true,
AllowsMarking = false
};
runtimeDepends.Add(runtimeDependsView);
var packageDependsView = new ListView(Array.Empty<Node>())
{
CanFocus = true,
AllowsMarking = false
};
packageDepends.Add(packageDependsView);
var reverseDependsView = new ListView(Array.Empty<Node>())
{
CanFocus = true,
AllowsMarking = false
};
reverseDepends.Add(reverseDependsView);

right.Add(runtimeDepends, packageDepends, reverseDepends);
top.Add(left, right, helpText);
Application.Top.Add(top)

The right side gets three ListViews added to it and the left side gets the dependencies view. Top it off with some clean data binding to the views and an initial call to UpdateLists. Anytime the dependenciesView gets a SelectedChanged event we'll call UpdateLists again.

top.Dependencies = orderedDependencyList;
top.VisibleDependencies = orderedDependencyList;
top.DependenciesView = dependenciesView;

dependenciesView.SelectedItem = 0;
UpdateLists();

dependenciesView.SelectedChanged += UpdateLists;

Application.Run();

What's in update lists? Filtering code for that graph variable from before.

void UpdateLists()
{
var selectedNode = top.VisibleDependencies[dependenciesView.SelectedItem];

runtimeDependsView.SetSource(graph.Edges.Where(x => x.Start.Equals(selectedNode) && x.End is AssemblyReferenceNode)
.Select(x => x.End).ToImmutableList());
packageDependsView.SetSource(graph.Edges.Where(x => x.Start.Equals(selectedNode) && x.End is PackageReferenceNode)
.Select(x => $"{x.End}{(string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.Label) ? string.Empty : " (Wanted: " + x.Label + ")")}").ToImmutableList());
reverseDependsView.SetSource(graph.Edges.Where(x => x.End.Equals(selectedNode))
.Select(x => $"{x.Start}{(string.IsNullOrEmpty(x.Label) ? string.Empty : " (Wanted: " + x.Label + ")")}").ToImmutableList());
}

That's basically it and it's fast as heck. Probably to be expected from the folks that brought you Midnight Commander.

Are you working on any utilities or cool projects and might want to consider - gasp - text mode over a website?


Sponsor: Looking for a tool for performance profiling, unit test coverage, and continuous testing that works cross-platform on Windows, macOS, and Linux? Check out the latest JetBrains Rider!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Docker Desktop for WSL 2 integrates Windows 10 and Linux even closer

July 30, '19 Comments [13] Posted in Docker | Linux | Open Source
Sponsored By

Being able to seamlessly run Linux on Windows is making a bunch of common development tasks easier. When you're running WSL2 (Windows Subsystem for Linux 2) in a version of Windows 10 greater than build 18945, a BUNCH of useful and interesting scenarios light up and stuff just works.

Docker for Windows (download the Docker Desktop for WSL 2 Tech preview here) is great, but it has historically worked on Windows by creating a Hyper-V virtual machine called Moby that is visible within the Hyper-V client. It's a utility VM, but it's one you're aware of.

Docker for Windows using WSL2

However, if WSL2 runs a real Linux kernel in Windows 10 and it's managing a virtual machine platform underneath (and not visible to) Hyper-V client tools, then why not just let WSL2 handle containers for us?

That's exactly what the Docker Desklop WSL 2 Tech Preview aims to do. And just like WSL 2, it's fast.

...the time required to start a Docker daemon after a cold start is significantly faster. It takes less than 2 seconds to start the Docker daemon when compared to tens of seconds in the current version of Docker Desktop.

Once you've got a Linux (Ubuntu or the like) set up in WSL 2, you can right click on Docker Deskop and click "WSL 2 Tech Preview." This is a goofy and not-super-intuitive UI for now but it's a moment in time.

Click WSL 2 Tech Preview

Then you just hit Start.

NOTE: If you've already installed Docker within WSL 2 at the command line, stop it and let Docker Desktop manage its lifecycle.

Here's the beginnings of their UI.

Docker for WSL2

When I drop out to PowerShell/CMD on Windows I can run "docker context ls."

C:\Users\Scott\Desktop> docker context ls    
NAME DESCRIPTION DOCKER ENDPOINT
default Current DOCKER_HOST based configuration npipe:////./pipe/docker_engine
wsl * Docker daemon hosted in WSL 2 npipe:////./pipe/docker_wsl

You can see there's two contexts, and I've run "docker context use wsl" and that's now my default.

Here is docker images from Ubuntu, and again from Windows (in PowerShell Core). They are the same!

Docker images in Ubuntu
Docker images from Powershell

Sweet. Here I am using PowerShell Core (which is open source and cross-platform, natch) to manage my builds which are themselves cross-platform and I can run both a docker build or a metal build on both Windows or Linux, all seamlessly on the same box.

building docker images

Also note, Simon from Docker points out "We are using a non default dataroot in this mode to avoid corrupting a datastore you use without docker desktop in case something goes wrong. Stopping the docker desktop wsl daemon and restarting the one you installed manually should bring everything back." I noticed this because my "Windows Docker" and my original WSL2 docker had a list of images that I naively expected to be available here, but this is a new context and new dataroot so you may need to fetch images again in this new world if you're have been historically an active docker user.

So far I'm super impressed. Linux on the Windows Desktop feels right. It's Peanut Butter and Chocolate.


Sponsor: Looking for a tool for performance profiling, unit test coverage, and continuous testing that works cross-platform on Windows, macOS, and Linux? Check out the latest JetBrains Rider!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Ruby on Rails on Windows is not just possible, it's fabulous using WSL2 and VS Code

July 25, '19 Comments [12] Posted in Linux | Open Source | Ruby | Win10
Sponsored By

I've been trying on and off to enjoy Ruby on Rails development on Windows for many years. I was doing Ruby on Windows as long as 13 years ago. There's been many valiant efforts to make Rails on Windows a good experience. However, given that Windows 10 can run Linux with WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) and now Windows runs Linux at near-native speeds with an actual shipping Linux Kernel using WSL2, Ruby on Rails folks using Windows should do their work in WSL2.

Running Ruby on Rails on Windows

Get a recent Windows 10

WSL2 will be released later this year but for now you can easily get it by signing up for Windows Insiders Fast and making sure your version of Windows is 18945 or greater. Just run "winver" to see your build number. Run Windows Update and get the latest.

Enable WSL2

You'll want the newest Windows Subsystem for Linux. From a PowerShell admin prompt run this:

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux

and head over to the Windows Store and search for "Linux" or get Ubuntu 18.04 LTS directly. Download it, run it, make your sudo user.

Make sure your distro is running at max speed with WSL2. That earlier PowerShell prompt run wsl --list -v to see your distros and their WSL versions.

C:\Users\Scott\Desktop> wsl --list -v
NAME STATE VERSION
* Ubuntu-18.04 Running 2
Ubuntu Stopped 1
WLinux Stopped 1

You can upgrade any WSL1 distro like this, and once it's done, it's done.

wsl --set-version "Ubuntu-18.04" 2

And certainly feel free to get cool fonts and styles and make yourself a nice shiny Linux experience...maybe with the Windows Terminal.

Get the Windows Terminal

Bonus points, get the new open source Windows Terminal for a better experience at the command line. Install it AFTER you've set up Ubuntu or a Linux and it'll auto-populate its menu for you. Otherwise, edit your profiles.json and make a profile with a commandLine like this:

"commandline" : "wsl.exe -d Ubuntu-18.04"

See how I'm calling wsl -d (for distro) with the short name of the distro?

Ubuntu in the Terminal Menu

Since I have a real Ubuntu environment on Windows I can just follow these instructions to set up Rails!

Set up Ruby on Rails

Ubuntu instructions work because it is Ubuntu! https://gorails.com/setup/ubuntu/18.04

Additionally, I can install as as many Linuxes as I want, even a Dev vs. Prod environment if I like. WSL2 is much lighter weight than a full Virtual Machine.

Once Rails is set up, I'll try making a new hello world:

rails new myapp

and here's the result!

Ruby on Rails in the new Windows Terminal

I can also run "explorer.exe ." and launch Windows Explorer and see and manage my Linux files. That's allowed now in WSL2 because it's running a Plan9 server for file access.

Ubuntu files inside Explorer on Windows 10

Install VS Code and the VS Code Remote Extension Pack

I'm going to install the VSCode Remote Extension pack so I can develop from Windows on remote machines OR in WSL or  Container directly. I can click the lower level corner of VS Code or check the Command Palette for this list of menu items. Here I can "Reopen Folder in WSL" and pick the distro I want to use.

Remote options in VS Code

Now that I've opened the folder for development WSL look closely at the lower left corner. You can see I'm in a WSL development mode AND Visual Studio Code is recommending I install a Ruby VS Code extension...inside WSL! I don't even have Ruby and Rails on Windows. I'm going to have the Ruby language servers and VS Code headless parts live in WSL - in Linux - where they'll be the most useful.

Ruby inside WSL

This synergy, this balance between Windows (which I enjoy) and Linux (whose command line I enjoy) has turned out to be super productive. I'm able to do all the work I want - Go, Rust, Python, .NET, Ruby - and move smoothly between environments. There's not a clear separation like there is with the "run it in a VM" solution. I can access my Windows files from /mnt/c from within Linux, and I can always get to my Linux files at \\wsl$ from within Windows.

Note that I'm running rails server -b=0.0.0.0 to bind on all available IPs, and this makes Rails available to "localhost" so I can hit the Rails site from Windows! It's my machine, so it's my localhost (the networking complexities are handled by WSL2).

$ rails server -b=0.0.0.0
=> Booting Puma
=> Rails 6.0.0.rc2 application starting in development
=> Run `rails server --help` for more startup options
Puma starting in single mode...
* Version 3.12.1 (ruby 2.6.2-p47), codename: Llamas in Pajamas
* Min threads: 5, max threads: 5
* Environment: development
* Listening on tcp://0.0.0.0:3000
Use Ctrl-C to stop

Here it is in new Edge (chromium). So this is Ruby on Rails running in WSL, as browsed to from Windows, using the new Edge with Chromium at its heart. Cats and dogs, living together, mass hysteria.

Ruby on Rails on Windows from WSL

Even better, I can install the ruby-debug-ide gem inside WSL and now I'm doing interactive debugging from VS Code, but again, note that the "work" is happening inside WSL.

Debugging Rails on Windows

Enjoy!


Sponsor: Get the latest JetBrains Rider with WinForms designer, Edit & Continue, and an IL (Intermediate Language) viewer. Preliminary C# 8.0 support, rename refactoring for F#-defined symbols across your entire solution, and Custom Themes are all included.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

System.Text.Json and new built-in JSON support in .NET Core

July 23, '19 Comments [10] Posted in ASP.NET | DotNetCore | Javascript
Sponsored By

In a world where JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) is everywhere it's long been somewhat frustrating that .NET didn't have built-in JSON support. JSON.NET is great and has served us well but it's remained a 3rd party dependency for basic stuff like an ASP.NET web site or a simple console app.

Back in 2018 plans were announced to move JSON into .NET Core 3.0 as an intrinsic supported feature, and while they're at it, get double the performance or more with Span<T> support and no memory allocations. ASP.NET in .NET Core 3.0 removes the JSON.NET dependency but still allows you to add it back in a single line if you'd like.

NOTE: This is all automatic and built in with .NET Core 3.0, but if you’re targeting .NET Standard or .NET Framework. Install the System.Text.Json NuGet package (make sure to include previews and install version 4.6.0-preview6.19303.8 or higher). In order to get the integration with ASP.NET Core, you must target .NET Core 3.0.

It's very clean as well. Here's a simple example.

using System;
using System.Text.Json;
using System.Text.Json.Serialization;

namespace verysmall
{
class WeatherForecast
{
public DateTimeOffset Date { get; set; }
public int TemperatureC { get; set; }
public string Summary { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
static void Main(string[] args)
{
var w = new WeatherForecast() { Date = DateTime.Now, TemperatureC = 30, Summary = "Hot" };
Console.WriteLine(JsonSerializer.Serialize<WeatherForecast>(w));
}
}
}

The default options result in minified JSON as well.

{"Date":"2019-07-27T00:58:17.9478427-07:00","TemperatureC":30,"Summary":"Hot"}      

Of course, when you're returning JSON from a Controller in ASP.NET it's all automatic and with .NET Core 3.0 it'll automatically use the new System.Text.Json unless you override it.

Here's an example where we pull out some fake Weather data (5 randomly created reports) and return the array.

[HttpGet]
public IEnumerable<WeatherForecast> Get()
{
var rng = new Random();
return Enumerable.Range(1, 5).Select(index => new WeatherForecast
{
Date = DateTime.Now.AddDays(index),
TemperatureC = rng.Next(-20, 55),
Summary = Summaries[rng.Next(Summaries.Length)]
})
.ToArray();
}

The application/json is used and JSON is returned by default. If the return type was just string, we'd get text/plain. Check out this YouTube video to learn more details about System.Text.Json works and how it was designed. I'm looking forward to working with it more!


Sponsor: Get the latest JetBrains Rider with WinForms designer, Edit & Continue, and an IL (Intermediate Language) viewer. Preliminary C# 8.0 support, rename refactoring for F#-defined symbols across your entire solution, and Custom Themes are all included.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Installing PowerShell with one line as a .NET Core global tool

July 18, '19 Comments [4] Posted in DotNetCore | Open Source | PowerShell
Sponsored By

I'PowerShell Mascotm a huge fan of .NET Core global tools. I've done a podcast on Global Tools. Just like Node and other platform have globally tools that can be easily and quickly installed and then used in build scripts, CI/CD (Continuous Integration/Continuous Deployment) systems, or just general command line utilities, .NET Global Tools are easily made (by you!) and distributed via NuGet.

Some cool examples (and there are hundreds) are the "Try .NET" Workshop runner and creator that can you can use to make interactive documentation, or coverlet for code coverage. There's a great and growing list of .NET Core Global Tools on GitHub.

If you've got the .NET SDK installed you can try out a global tool just like this.

dotnet tool install -g dotnetsay

Then run this example with "dotnetsay," it's fun.

stepping back a moment, you may be familiar with PowerShell. It's a scripting language and a command line shell like Bash or DOS or the Windows Command Prompt. You may think of PowerShell as a tool for maintaining and managing Windows Servers.

However in recent years, PowerShell has gone cross platform and runs most anywhere. It's lightweight and has .NET Core at its, ahem, core. You can use PowerShell for scripting systems on any platform and if you're a .NET developer the team has made installing and immediately using PowerShell in scripts a one liner - which is genius. It's PowerShell as a .NET Global Tool.

Here's an example output from my system running Ubuntu. I just "dotnet tool install --global PowerShell."

$ dotnet --version
2.1.502
$ dotnet tool install --global PowerShell
You can invoke the tool using the following command: pwsh
Tool 'powershell' (version '6.2.2') was successfully installed.
$ pwsh
PowerShell 6.1.1
https://aka.ms/pscore6-docs
Type 'help' to get help.
PS /mnt/c/Users/Scott/Desktop>
exit

Here I've checked that I have .NET 2.x or above, then I install PowerShell. I can run scripts or I can drop into the interactive shell. Note the PS prompt and my current directory above.

In fact, PowerShell is so useful as a scripting language when combined with .NET Core that PowerShell has been included as a global tool within the .NET Core 3.0 Preview Docker images since Preview 4. This means you can use PowerShell lines/scripts inside Docker images.

FROM mcr.microsoft.com/dotnet/core/sdk:3.0
RUN pwsh -c Get-Date
RUN pwsh -c "Get-Module -ListAvailable | Select-Object -Property Name, Path"

Being able to easily install PowerShell as a global tool means you can count on it in your scripts, CI/CDs systems, or docker containers. It's also nice to be able to be able to use existing PowerShell scripts cross platform.

I'm impressed with this idea - installing PowerShell itself as a .NET Global Tool. Very clever and useful.


Sponsor: Ossum unifies agile planning, version control, and continuous integration into a smart platform that saves 3x the time and effort so your team can focus on building their next great product. Sign up free.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.