Scott Hanselman

Now is the time to make a fresh new Windows Terminal profiles.json

October 3, '19 Comments [14] Posted in Open Source | Win10
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I've been talking about it for months, but in case you haven't heard, there's a new Windows Terminal in town. You can download it and start using it now from the Windows Store. It's free and open source.

At the time of this writing, Windows Terminal is around version 0.5. It's not officially released as a 1.0 so things are changing all the time.

Here's your todo - Have you installed the Windows Terminal before? Have you customize your profile.json file? If so, I want you to DELETE your profiles.json!

Your profiles.json is somewhere like C:\Users\USERNAME\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbwe\LocalState but you can get to it from the drop down in the Windows Terminal like this:

Windows Terminal dropdown

When you hit Settings, Windows Terminal will launch whatever app is registered to handle JSON files. In my case, I'm using Visual Studio Code.

I have done a lot of customization on my profiles.json, so before I delete or "zero out" my profiles.json I will save a copy somewhere. You should to!

You can just "ctrl-a" and delete all of your profiles.json when it's open and Windows Terminal 0.5 or greater will recreate it from scratch by detecting the shells you have. Remember, a Console or Terminal isn't a Shell!

Note the new profiles.json also includes another tip! You can hold ALT- and click settings to see the default settings! This new profiles.json is simpler to read and understand because there's an inherited default.


// To view the default settings, hold "alt" while clicking on the "Settings" button.
// For documentation on these settings, see: https://aka.ms/terminal-documentation

{
"$schema": "https://aka.ms/terminal-profiles-schema",

"defaultProfile": "{61c54bbd-c2c6-5271-96e7-009a87ff44bf}",

"profiles":
[
{
// Make changes here to the powershell.exe profile
"guid": "{61c54bbd-c2c6-5271-96e7-009a87ff44bf}",
"name": "Windows PowerShell",
"commandline": "powershell.exe",
"hidden": false
},
{
// Make changes here to the cmd.exe profile
"guid": "{0caa0dad-35be-5f56-a8ff-afceeeaa6101}",
"name": "cmd",
"commandline": "cmd.exe",
"hidden": false
},
{
"guid": "{574e775e-4f2a-5b96-ac1e-a2962a402336}",
"hidden": false,
"name": "PowerShell Core",
"source": "Windows.Terminal.PowershellCore"
},
...

You'll notice there's a new $schema that gives you dropdown Intellisense so you can autocomplete properties and their values now! Check out the Windows Terminal Documentation here https://aka.ms/terminal-documentation and the complete list of things you can do in your profiles.json is here.

I've made these changes to my Profile.json.

Split panes

I've added "requestedTheme" and changed it to dark, to get a black titleBar with tabs.

requestedTheme = dark

I also wanted to test the new (not even close to done) splitscreen features, that give you a simplistic tmux style of window panes, without any other software.

// Add any keybinding overrides to this array.
// To unbind a default keybinding, set the command to "unbound"
"keybindings": [
{ "command": "closeWindow", "keys": ["alt+f4"] },
{ "command": "splitHorizontal", "keys": ["ctrl+-"]},
{ "command": "splitVertical", "keys": ["ctrl+\\"]}
]

Then I added an Ubuntu specific color scheme, named UbuntuLegit.

// Add custom color schemes to this array
"schemes": [
{
"background" : "#2C001E",
"black" : "#4E9A06",
"blue" : "#3465A4",
"brightBlack" : "#555753",
"brightBlue" : "#729FCF",
"brightCyan" : "#34E2E2",
"brightGreen" : "#8AE234",
"brightPurple" : "#AD7FA8",
"brightRed" : "#EF2929",
"brightWhite" : "#EEEEEE",
"brightYellow" : "#FCE94F",
"cyan" : "#06989A",
"foreground" : "#EEEEEE",
"green" : "#300A24",
"name" : "UbuntuLegit",
"purple" : "#75507B",
"red" : "#CC0000",
"white" : "#D3D7CF",
"yellow" : "#C4A000"
}
],

And finally, I added a custom command prompt that runs Mono's x86 developer prompt.

{
"guid": "{b463ae62-4e3d-5e58-b989-0a998ec441b8}",
"hidden": false,
"name": "Mono",
"fontFace": "DelugiaCode NF",
"fontSize": 16,
"commandline": "C://Windows//SysWOW64//cmd.exe /k \"C://Program Files (x86)//Mono//bin//setmonopath.bat\"",
"icon": "c://Users//scott//Dropbox//mono.png"
}

Note I'm using forward slashes an double escaping them, as well as backslash escaping quotes.

Save your profiles.json away somewhere, make sure your Terminal is updated, then delete it or empty it and you'll likely get some new "free" shells that the Terminal will detect, then you can copy in just the few customizations you want.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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A wonderfully unholy alliance - Real Linux commands for PowerShell with WSL function wrappers

October 1, '19 Comments [10] Posted in Linux | PowerShell
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Dropdown filled with shells in the Windows TerminalI posted recently about What's the difference between a console, a terminal, and a shell? The world of Windows is interesting - and a little weird and unfamiliar to non-Windows people. You might use Ubuntu or Mac and you've picked your shell like zsh or bash or pwsh, but then you come to Windows and we're hopping between shells (and now operating systems with WSL!) on a tab by tab basis.

If you're using a Windows shell like PowerShell because you like it's .NET Core based engine and powerful scripting language, you might still miss common *nix shell commands like ls, grep, sed and more.

No matter what shell you're using in Windows (powershell, yori, cmd, whatever) you can always call into your default Ubuntu instance with "wsl command" so "wsl ls" or "wsl grep" but it'd be nice to make those more naturally and comfortably integrated.

Now there's a new series of "function wrappers" that make Linux commands available directly in PowerShell so you can easily transition between multiple environments.

This might seem weird but it allows us to create amazing piped commands that move in and out of Windows and Linux, PowerShell and bash. It's actually pretty amazing and very natural if you, like me, are non-denominational in your choice of operating system and preferred shell.

These function wrappers are very neatly designed and even expose TAB completion across operating systems! That means I can type Linux commands in PowerShell and TAB completion comes along!

It's super easy to set up. From Mike Battista's Github

  • Install PowerShell Core
  • Install the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL)
  • Install the WslInterop module with Install-Module WslInterop
  • Import commands with Import-WslCommand either from your profile for persistent access or on demand when you need a command (e.g. Import-WslCommand "awk", "emacs", "grep", "head", "less", "ls", "man", "sed", "seq", "ssh", "tail", "vim")

You'll do your Install-Module just one, and then run notepad $profile and add just a that single last line. Make sure you change it to expose the WSL/Linux commands that you want. Once you're done, you can just open PowerShell Core and mix and match your commands!

From the blog, "With these function wrappers in place, we can now call our favorite Linux commands in a more natural way without having to prefix them with wsl or worry about how Windows paths are translated to WSL paths:"

  • man bash
  • less -i $profile.CurrentUserAllHosts
  • ls -Al C:\Windows\ | less
  • grep -Ein error *.log
  • tail -f *.log

It's a really genius thing and kudos to Mike for sharing it with us! Go try it now. https://github.com/mikebattista/PowerShell-WSL-Interop


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to download over 80 free 101-level C#, .NET, and ASP.NET for beginners videos for offline viewing

September 26, '19 Comments [5] Posted in DotNetCore | Learning .NET
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Earlier this week I announced over 80 new free videos in our .NET Core 3.0 launch video series - Announcing free C#, .NET, and ASP.NET for beginners video courses and tutorials

Three questions came up consistently:

  • My work or country blocks YouTube! What about me?
  • How can I download these and watch them offline?
  • I have very low bandwidth. Can I get smaller versions I can download over 3G/4G?

Here's some answers for you!

My work or country blocks YouTube! What about me?

First, we have updated http://dot.net/videos to include links to BOTH YouTube *and* to the same videos hosted on Microsoft's Channel 9, which shouldn't be blocked by you country or company!

How can I download these and watch them offline?

Good question! Here's how to download a whole series with PowerShell! Let's say I want to download "C# 101."

First, head over to https://dot.net/videos.

C# 101 videos

Second, click "Watch on Channel 9" there at the bottom of the series you want, in my case, C# 101.

Note that there's a link there in the corner that says "RSS" - that's Really Simple Syndication!

RSS Videos for Channel 9 Videos

Right click on the one you want, for example MP4 Low for people on low bandwidth connections! (Question #3 gets answered too, two for one!), and say "Copy Link Address." Now that link is in your clipboard!

Next, I made a little PowerShell script and put it here in a Gist. If you want, you can right click on this link here and Save Link As and name it something like DownloadVideos.ps1. Maybe save it in C:\temp or c:\users\YOURNAME\Desktop\DotNetVideos. Whatever makes you happy. Make sure you saved it with a *.ps1 extension.

Finally, open up the PS1 file in a text editor and check lines 2 and 3. Put in a path that's correct for YOUR computer, again, like C:\temp, or your downloads folder.

#CHECK THE PATH ON LINE 2 and the FEED on LINE 3
cd "C:\users\scott\Downloads"
$a = ([xml](new-object net.webclient).downloadstring("https://channel9.msdn.com/Series/CSharp-101/feed/mp4"))
$a.rss.channel.item | foreach{
$url = New-Object System.Uri($_.enclosure.url)
$file = $url.Segments[-1]
$file
if (!(test-path $file)) {
(New-Object System.Net.WebClient).DownloadFile($url, $file)
}
}

Make sure the RSS link that you copied earlier above is correct on line 3. We need a Local Folder and we need our Remote RSS Link.

NOTE: If you're an expert you might think this PowerShell script isn't fancy enough or doesn't do x or y, but it'll do pretty nicely for this project. You're welcome to fork it or improve it here.

And finally, open up PowerShell on your machine from the Start Menu and run your downloadvideos.ps1 script like in this screenshot.

What about getting Low Bandwidth videos I can download on a slow connection!

The low bandwidth videos are super small, some smaller than a JPEG! The largest is just 20 megs, so the full C# course is under 200 megs total.

You can download ALL the videos for EACH playlist by visiting http://dot.net/videos, getting the RSS URL for the video playlist you want, and running the PS1 script again with the changed URL on line 3.

Hope this helps!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Announcing free C#, .NET, and ASP.NET for beginners video courses and tutorials

September 24, '19 Comments [14] Posted in DotNetCore | Learning .NET | Open Source
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If you've been thinking about learning C#, now is the time to jump in! I've been working on this project for months and I'm happy to announce http://dot.net/videos 

There's nearly a hundred short videos (with more to come!) that will teach you topics like C# 101, .NET, making desktop apps, making ASP.NET web apps, learning containers and Dockers, or even starting with Machine Learning. There's a ton of great, slow-paced beginner videos. Most are less than 10 minutes long and all are organized into Playlists on YouTube!

If you are getting started, I'd recommend starting with these three series in this order - C#, .NET, then ASP.NET. After that, pick the topics that make you the happiest.

Lots of .NET learning videos and tutorials up on YouTube, free!

If you don't have access to YouTube where you are, all these videos are also on Channel 9 *and* can be downloaded locally via RSS feed! https://channel9.msdn.com/Browse/Series

Lots of .NET learning videos and tutorials up on YouTube, free!

If you like these, let me know what other topics you'd like us to cover! We are just getting started and already have intermediate and advanced C# classes in the works!


Sponsor: Like C#? We do too! That’s why we've developed a fast, smart, cross-platform .NET IDE which gives you even more coding power. Clever code analysis, rich code completion, instant search and navigation, an advanced debugger... With JetBrains Rider, everything you need is at your fingertips. Code C# at the speed of thought on Linux, Mac, or Windows. Try JetBrains Rider today!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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What's the difference between a console, a terminal, and a shell?

September 20, '19 Comments [14] Posted in Linux | Open Source | Win10
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I see a lot of questions that are close but the questions themselves show an underlying misunderstanding of some important terms.

  • Why would I use Windows Terminal over PowerShell?
  • I don't need WSL for bash, I use Cygwin.
  • Can I use conemu with PowerShell Core or do I need to use Windows Terminal?

Let's start with a glossary and clarify some words first.

Terminal

The word Terminal comes from terminate, indicating that it's the terminating end or "terminal" end of a communications process. You'll often hear "dumb terminal" when referring to a text-based environment where the computer you are sitting next to is just taking input and showing text while the real work happens at the other end in a mainframe or large computer.

TTY or "teletypewriter" was the first kind of terminal. Rather than a screen you'd have a literal typewriter in front of you. When you type on it, you're seeing the text on a piece of paper AND inputing that text into a computer. When that computer replies, you'll see the typewriter automatically type on the same paper.

Photo by Texas.713 used under CC

When we refer to a Terminal in the software sense, we're referring to a literal software version of a TTY or Terminal. The Windows Terminal is that. It's really good at displaying textual output. It can take input and pass it on. But the Terminal isn't smart. It doesn't actually process your input, it doesn't look at your files or think.

Console

Folks in the mid 20th century would have a piece of furniture in their living room called a console or console cabinet. A Console in the context of computers is a console or cabinet with a screen and keyboard combined inside it. But, it's effectively a Terminal. Technically the Console is the device and the Terminal is now the software program inside the Console.

image

In the software world a Terminal and a Console are, for all intents, synonymous.

Shell

A shell is the program that the terminal sends user input to. The shell generates output and passes it back to the terminal for display. Here's some examples of Shells:

  • bash, fish, zsh, ksh, sh, tsch
  • PowerShell, pwsh
  • cygwin
  • cmd, yori, 4dos, command.com

Here's an important point that should make more sense now that you have these terminals - Your choice of shell doesn't and shouldn't dictate your choice of terminal application.

Aside: WSL and WSL2 (the Windows Subsystem for Linux) are a complete local Linux (or many Linuxes) that run on Windows 10. They are full and real. WSL2 ships a real Linux kernel and runs in on Windows. Cygwin is NOT a Linux. Cygwin is a large collection of GNU and Open Source tools which provide functionality similar to Linux on Windows - but it is not Linux. It's a simulacrum. It's GNU utils compiled against Win32. It's great, but it's important for you to know what the difference is. Cygwin may let you run your shell scripts but it will NOT run Apache, Docker, or other real ELF-binaries and Linux apps.

Your Choice of Windows Consoles?

There are a number of shells that ship with Windows. Here's a few I'm running now. Note the "chrome" or the border and title around them? Those shells are all hosted by a the legacy Windows console you have never heard of called conhost.exe. You can go to the command prompt, type powershell, cmd, or ubuntu and any number of shells will run. Conhost does the work of input and output.

Now, forget that conhost exists, because it sucks - it's super old.

Shells that come with Windows

Pseudo Console, Pseudo Terminal, PTY, Pseudo TTY (ConPTY)

Pseudo Terminals are terminal emulators or software interfaces that emulate terminals. They pretend to be terminals like the ones above. *Nix systems have long had a pseudo-terminal (PTY) infrastructure and now Windows as a pseudoconsole (ConPTY) as well.

Window's new ConPTY interface is the future of consoles and terminals on Windows. If you choose a 3rd party (non-built-in) console applications for Windows, make sure it supports ConPTY and it'll be a better experience than some of the older consoles that use screen scraping or other hacks.

image

Back to your choice of Windows Consoles

Remembering there's a lot of shells you can use in Windows, there's a lot of 3rd party consoles you can use if you don't like conhost.exe (and you shouldn't).

All of these Terminals support ALL the shells above and any shells I've missed. Because a shell isn't a terminal. Pick the one that makes you happy. I use PowerShell Core and Ubuntu in WSL2 in the Windows Terminal.

Windows Terminal

Hope this helps clear things up.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.