Scott Hanselman

My views on community, productivity, kindness, and mindfulness on the Hanselminutes Fresh Tech Podcast

January 22, '20 Comments [4] Posted in Musings | Podcast
Sponsored By

Scott HanselmanAt the start of a new decade and over 700 episodes of my tech podcast, I did something weird. I had myself on the show. Egotistical, perhaps, given the show literally has my name in it, but the way it happened was interesting.

This episode wasn't supposed to be an episode! I was invited by Jeff Fritz of Twitch fame to talk to his community team of Live Coders on Discord. They recorded it, and mentioned several times that it was useful content! I didn't go into the private meeting thinking I'd record a show. It was effectively a conference call with friends old and new. It's unedited and off the cuff.

So, why not try something new and make this an episode! Let me know on Twitter if you find my views on community, productivity, and life useful to you!

I talk about:

  • Longevity - Sticking to your goals
  • Relationships - Business plans/goals/life settings/culture
  • Living Life By Design rather than By Default
  • Setting the Tone
  • Positivity and how to maintain it
  • Scaling yourself and your community
  • Why Kindness Matters
  • Blogging - it's a marathon not a sprint
  • Feeding your spirit
  • Why do we do something and why do we procrastinate?
  • Removing Mental Clutter
  • Why do I blog/create? Why do you?
  • Conserving your keystrokes
  • Advice to my 20 year old self
  • Willpower and catching up
  • What can you talk about? What can you write about?
  • A question is a gift
  • Why would I allow someone who doesn't love me ruin my day?
  • Interviewing techniques and empathy
  • The importance of improv and "yes, and"
  • Charisma On Command
  • Dealing with Imposter Syndrome
  • Deliberate Practice
  • Mindfulness
  • Owning what you're good at
  • Freaking Out
  • Acceptance
  • Priorities - family and life
  • What's important?
  • Plan, execute on the plan, make a new plan

Please go listen to Episode 719 of the Hanselminutes Podcast, it's just 54 minutes long.

Hanselminutes Podcast

It's called "Myself: It's not weird at all" and I'm actually kind of proud of it. Let me know what you think in the comments!

if you like this show, you can give ME a gift by SHARING it with your people!


Sponsor: Veracode analyzed 1.4 million scans for their 2019 SOSS X report. The findings? 83% of apps have flaws like cross-site scripting, injection, and authentication—all adding to rising security debt.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

The wires are crossed, literally! - Learning low level computing with Ben Eater's 6502 kit

December 20, '19 Comments [0] Posted in Hardware | Musings
Sponsored By

I've blogged about the importance of the LED Moment. You know, that moment when you get it to blink.

Ben Eater is a bit of an internet legend. His site at https://eater.net has a shop and YouTube videos where he's creating educational videos showing low level (and some what historical) computing.

He's known for "building an 8-bit CPU from scratch."

This tutorial walks through building a fully programmable 8-bit computer from simple logic gates on breadboards.

imageSimple logic gates? Yep, like && and || and 7400 series chips and what not. I learned on these 25 years ago in college and I sucked at it. I think I ended up making A CLOCK. Ben makes A COMPUTER.

This Christmas my gift to myself was to learn to build a 6502 computer (that's the processor that powered the Apple ][, the NES, the C64, the BBC Micro and more - it's literally the processor of my entire childhood). Ben has made the videos available free on YouTube and the parts list can be sourced however you'd like, but I chose to get mine directly from Ben as he's done all the work of putting the chips and wires in a box. I got the 6502 Computer Kit, the Clock Module Kit, and an EEPROM Programmer. I also ordered a Quimat 2.4" TFT Digital Oscilloscope Kit which is AMAZING for the value. Later I ordered a Pokit Oscilloscope that will use my phone for the screen.

I'm about halfway through the videos. There are 4 videos of about 1 hour each, but I've been following along and pausing. Ben will wire something up and speed up the video, so each 1 hour video has taken me about 4-5 hours of actual time, as I'm cutting and stripping wires manually and trying to get my board to look and behave like Ben's in the video. More importantly, I made the promise to myself that I'd not continue if I didn't understand (mostly) what was happening AND I wouldn't continue if my board didn't actually work.

At the middle-end of Video 2, we're hooking up a newly flashed EEPROM that has our computer program on it. This isn't even at Assembly Language yet - we're writing the actual Hex Codes of the processor instructions into a 32768 byte long binary file and then flashing the result to an EEPROM and reseating it each time.

Madness! Flashing an EEPROM

I'd respectfully ask that you follow me on Instragram as I'm documenting my experience in photos.

A few days ago I was manually stepping (one clock pulse at a time) through some code and I kept getting "B2" - and by "getting" that value, I mean that quite literally there are 8 blue wires coming off the data line (8 pins) on an EEPROM and they are going to turn 8 LEDs on or off. I wanted to get the number "AA."

What. I'm getting B2, I want AA. I have no idea. Do I pull it apart and redo the whole board? How many hours ago did I make a mistake? 3? 7? I was sad and dejected.

And I stared.

But then I thought. Why is AA is a lovely hex number? Because it's as it's alternating 1s and 0s, of 10101010.

I was getting B2 which is 10110010.

10110010

10110010

I had swapped two of the wires going from the EEPROM to the Processor. I was getting exactly what I asked for. I swapped to wires/pins so the bins were swapped.

I wasn't groking it until I stopped a thought and looked from multiple angles. What am I doing? What's my goal? What is physically happening here? What abstractions have I added? (even voltage -> binary -> hex is three abstractions!)

It seems a small and stupid thing. Perhaps you, Dear Reader, immediately knew what I had done wrong and were shouting it at this blog post 3 paragraphs ago. Perhaps you've never spent 13 hours debugging a Carriage Return.

But I didn't understand. And then I did. And I swapped two wires and it worked, dammit. Here is a video of it working, in fact.

It felt very good. My jaw dropped.

I feel like NOW, today, I'm ready to go to college and fix my B in Electronics Class.

Youth is wasted on the young, my friends. What have YOU been learning lately?


Sponsor: Like C#? We do too! That’s why we've developed a fast, smart, cross-platform .NET IDE which gives you even more coding power. Clever code analysis, rich code completion, instant search and navigation, an advanced debugger... With JetBrains Rider, everything you need is at your fingertips. Code C# at the speed of thought on Linux, Mac, or Windows. Try JetBrains Rider today!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Advice to my 20 year old self

December 6, '19 Comments [29] Posted in Musings
Sponsored By

A lovely interactionI had a lovely interaction on Twitter recently where a young person reached out to me over Twitter DM.

She said:

If you could go back and give your 20-something-year-old self some advice, what would you say?

I’m about to graduate and I’m sort of terrified to enter the real world, so I’ve sort of been asking everyone.

What a great question! Off the top of my head - while sitting on the tarmac waiting for takeoff and frantically thumb-typing - I offered this brainstorm.

First
Avoid drama. In relationships and friends
Discard negative people
There’s 8 billion people out there
You don’t have to be friends with them all
Don’t let anyone hold you back or down
We waste hours and days and years with negative people
Collect awesome people like Pokémon
Network your butt off. Talk to everyone nice
Make sure they aren’t transactional networkers
Nice people don’t keep score
They generously share their network
And ask for nothing in return but your professionalism
Don’t use a credit card and get into debt if you can
Whatever you want to buy you likely don’t need it
Get a laptop and an iPad and buy experiences
Don’t buy things. Avoid wanting things
Molecules are expensive
Electrons are basically free
If you can avoid want now, you’ll be happier later
None of us are getting out of this alive
And we don’t get to take any of the stuff
So ask yourself what do I want
What is happiness for you
And optimize your existence around that thing
Enjoy the simple. street food. Good friends
If you don’t want things then you’ll enjoy people of all types
Use a password system like
@1Password
and manage your digital shit tightly
Be focused
And it will be ok
Does this help?

What's YOUR advice to your 20 year old self?


Sponsor: Like C#? We do too! That’s why we've developed a fast, smart, cross-platform .NET IDE which gives you even more coding power. Clever code analysis, rich code completion, instant search and navigation, an advanced debugger... With JetBrains Rider, everything you need is at your fingertips. Code C# at the speed of thought on Linux, Mac, or Windows. Try JetBrains Rider today!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Computer things they didn't teach you in school #2 - Code Pages, Character Encoding, Unicode, UTF-8 and the BOM

November 15, '19 Comments [16] Posted in Musings
Sponsored By

OK, fine maybe they DID teach you this in class. But, you'd be surprised how many people think they know something but don't know the background or the etymology of a term. I find these things fascinating. In a world of bootcamp graduates, community college attendees (myself included!), and self-taught learners, I think it's fun to explore topics like the ones I plan to cover in my new YouTube Series "Computer things they didn't teach you."

BOOK RECOMMENDATION: I think of this series as being in the same vein as the wonderful "Imposter's Handbook" series from Rob Conery (I was also involved, somewhat). In Rob's excellent words: "Learn core CS concepts that are part of every CS degree by reading a book meant for humans. You already know how to code build things, but when it comes to conversations about Big-O notation, database normalization and binary tree traversal you grow silent. That used to happen to me and I decided to change it because I hated being left out. I studied for 3 years and wrote everything down and the result is this book."

In the first video I covered the concept of Carriage Returns and Line Feeds. But do you know WHY it's called a Carriage Return? What's a carriage? Where did it go? Where is it returning from? Who is feeding it lines?

In this second video I talk about Code Pages, Character Encoding, Unicode, UTF-8 and the BOM. I thought it went very well.

What would you like to hear about next?


Sponsor: Like C#? We do too! That’s why we've developed a fast, smart, cross-platform .NET IDE which gives you even more coding power. Clever code analysis, rich code completion, instant search and navigation, an advanced debugger... With JetBrains Rider, everything you need is at your fingertips. Code C# at the speed of thought on Linux, Mac, or Windows. Try JetBrains Rider today!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

New YouTube Series: Computer things they didn't teach you in school

November 8, '19 Comments [17] Posted in Musings
Sponsored By

OK, fine maybe they DID teach you this in class. But, you'd be surprised how many people think they know something but don't know the background or the etymology of a term. I find these things fascinating. In a world of bootcamp graduates, community college attendees (myself included!), and self-taught learners, I think it's fun to explore topics like the ones I plan to cover in my new YouTube Series "Computer things they didn't teach you."

BOOK RECOMMENDATION: I think of this series as being in the same vein as the wonderful "Imposter's Handbook" series from Rob Conery (I was also involved, somewhat). In Rob's excellent words: "Learn core CS concepts that are part of every CS degree by reading a book meant for humans. You already know how to code build things, but when it comes to conversations about Big-O notation, database normalization and binary tree traversal you grow silent. That used to happen to me and I decided to change it because I hated being left out. I studied for 3 years and wrote everything down and the result is this book."

Of course it'll take exactly 2 comments before someone comments with "I don't know what crappy school you're going to but we learned this stuff when they handed us our schedule." Fine, maybe this series isn't for you.

In fact I'm doing this series and putting it out there for me. If it helps someone, all the better!

In this first video I cover the concept of Carriage Returns and Line Feeds. But do you know WHY it's called a Carriage Return? What's a carriage? Where did it go? Where is it returning from? Who is feeding it lines?

What would you suggest I do for the next video in the series? I'm thinking Unicode, UTF-8, BOMs, and character encoding.


Sponsor: Octopus Deploy wanted me to let you know that Octopus Server is now free for small teams, without time limits. Give your team a single place to release, deploy and operate your software.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb
Previous Page Page 2 of 143 in the Musings category Next Page

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.