Scott Hanselman

Terminus and FluentTerminal are the start of a world of 3rd party OSS console replacements for Windows

November 9, '18 Comments [8] Posted in Open Source | Tools
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Folks have been trying to fix supercharge the console/command line on Windows since Day One. There's a ton of open source projects over the year that try to take over or improve on "conhost.exe" (the thing that handles consoles like Bash/PowerShell/cmd on Windows). Most of these 3rd party consoles have weird or subtle issues. For example, I like Hyper as a terminal but it doesn't support Ctrl-C at the command line. I use that hotkey often enough that this small bug means I just won't use that console at all.

Per the CommandLine blog:

One of those weaknesses is that Windows tries to be "helpful" but gets in the way of alternative and 3rd party Console developers, service developers, etc. When building a Console or service, developers need to be able to access/supply the communication pipes through which their Terminal/service communicates with command-line applications. In the *NIX world, this isn't a problem because *NIX provides a "Pseudo Terminal" (PTY) infrastructure which makes it easy to build the communication plumbing for a Console or service, but Windows does not...until now!

Looks like the Windows Console team is working on making 3rd party consoles better by creating this new PTY mechanism:

We've heard from many, many developers, who've frequently requested a PTY-like mechanism in Windows - especially those who created and/or work on ConEmu/Cmder, Console2/ConsoleZ, Hyper, VSCode, Visual Studio, WSL, Docker, and OpenSSH.

Very cool! Until it's ready I'm going to continue to try out new consoles. A lot of people will tell you to use the cmder package that includes ConEmu. There's a whole world of 3rd party consoles to explore. Even more fun are the choices of color schemes and fonts to explore.

For a while I was really excited about Hyper. Hyper is - wait for it - an electron app that uses HTML/CSS for the rendering of the console. This is a pretty heavyweight solution to the rendering that means you're looking at 200+ megs of memory for a console rather than 5 megs or so for something native. However, it is a clever way to just punt and let a browser renderer handle all the complex font management. For web-folks it's also totally extensible and skinnable.

As much as I like Hyper and its look, the inability to support hitting "Ctrl-C" at the command line is just too annoying. It appears it's a very well-understood issue that will ultimately be solved by the ConPTY work as the underlying issue is a deficiency in the node-pty library. It's also a long-running issue in the VS Code console support. You can watch the good work that's starting in this node-pty PR that will fix a lot of issues for node-based consoles.

Until this all fixes itself, I'm personally excited (and using) these two terminals for Windows that you may not have heard of.

Terminus

Terminus is open source over at https://github.com/Eugeny/terminus and works on any OS. It's immediately gorgeous, and while it's in alpha, it's very polished. Be sure to explore the settings and adjust things like Blur/Fluent, Themes, opacity, and fonts. I'm using FiraCode Retina with Ligatures for my console and it's lovely. You'll have to turn ligature support on explicitly under Settings | Appearance.

Terminus is a lovely console replacement

Terminus also has some nice plugins. I've added Altair, Clickable-Links, and Shell-Selector to my loadout. The shell selector makes it easy on Windows 10 to have PowerShell, Cmd, and Ubuntu/Bash open all at the same time in multiple tabs.

I did do a little editing of the default config file to set up Ctrl-T for new tab and Ctrl-W for close-tab for my personal taste.

FluentTerminal

FluentTerminal is a Terminal Emulator based on UWP. Its memory usage on my machine is about 1/3 of Terminus and under 100 megs. As a Windows 10 UWP app it looks and feels very native. It supports ALT-ENTER Fullscreen, and tabs for as many consoles as you'd like. You can right-click and color specific tabs which was a nice surprise and turned out to be useful for on-the-fly categorization.

image

FluentTerminal has a nice themes setup and includes a half-dozen to start, plus supports imports.

It's not yet in the Windows Store (perhaps because it's in active development) but you can easily download a release and install it with a PowerShell install.ps1 script.

I have found the default Keybindings very intuitive with the usual Ctrl-T and Ctrl-W tab managers already set up, as well as Shift-Ctrl-T for opening a new tab for a specific shell profile (cmd, powershell, wsl, etc).

Both of these are great new entries in the 3rd party terminal space and I'd encourage you to try them both out and perhaps get involved on their respective GitHubs! It's a great time to be doing console work on Windows 10!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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New prescriptive guidance for Open Source .NET Library Authors

October 16, '18 Comments [5] Posted in DotNetCore | Open Source
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Open-source library guidanceThere's a great new bunch of guidance just published representing Best Practices for creating .NET Libraries. Best of all, it was shepherded by JSON.NET's James Newton-King. Who better to help explain the best way to build and publish a .NET library than the author of the world's most popular open source .NET library?

Perhaps you've got an open source (OSS) .NET Library on your GitHub, GitLab, or Bitbucket. Go check out the open-source library guidance.

These are the identified aspects of high-quality open-source .NET libraries:

  • Inclusive - Good .NET libraries strive to support many platforms and applications.
  • Stable - Good .NET libraries coexist in the .NET ecosystem, running in applications built with many libraries.
  • Designed to evolve - .NET libraries should improve and evolve over time, while supporting existing users.
  • Debuggable - .NET libraries should use the latest tools to create a great debugging experience for users.
  • Trusted - .NET libraries have developers' trust by publishing to NuGet using security best practices.

The guidance is deep but also preliminary. As with all Microsoft Documentation these days it's open source in Markdown and on GitHub. If you've got suggestions or thoughts, share them! Be sure to sound off in the Feedback Section at the bottom of the guidance. James and the Team will be actively incorporating your thoughts.

Cross-platform targeting

Since the whole point of .NET Core and the .NET Standard is reuse, this section covers how and why to make reusable code but also how to access platform-specific APIs when needed with multi-targeting.

Strong naming

Strong naming seemed like a good idea but you should know WHY and WHEN to strong name. It all depends on your use case! Are you publishing internally or publically? What are your dependencies and who depends on you?

NuGet

When publishing on the NuGet public repository (or your own private/internal one) what do you need to know about SemVer 2.0.0? What about pre-release packages? Should you embed PDBs for easier debugging? Consider things like Dependencies, SourceLink, how and where to Publish and how Versioning applies to you and when (or if) you cause Breaking changes.

Also be sure to check out Immo's video on "Building Great Libraries with .NET Standard" on YouTube!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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C# and .NET Core scripting with the "dotnet-script" global tool

October 12, '18 Comments [12] Posted in DotNetCore | Open Source
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dotnet scriptYou likely know that open source .NET Core is cross platform and it's super easy to do "Hello World" and start writing some code.

You just install .NET Core, then "dotnet new console" which will generate a project file and basic app, then "dotnet run" will compile and run your app? The 'new' command will create all the supporting code, obj, and bin folders, etc. When you do "dotnet run" it actually is a combination of "dotnet build" and "dotnet exec whatever.dll."

What could be easier?

What about .NET Core as scripting?

Check out dotnet script:

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\scriptie> dotnet tool install -g dotnet-script
You can invoke the tool using the following command: dotnet-script
C:\Users\scott\Desktop\scriptie>copy con helloworld.csx
Console.WriteLine("Hello world!");
^Z
1 file(s) copied.
C:\Users\scott\Desktop\scriptie>dotnet script helloworld.csx
Hello world!

NOTE: I was a little tricky there in step two. I did a "copy con filename" to copy from the console to the destination file, then used Ctrl-Z to finish the copy. Feel free to just use notepad or vim. That's not dotnet-script-specific, that's Hanselman-specific.

Pretty cool eh? If you were doing this in Linux or OSX you'll need to include a "shebang" as the first line of the script. This is a standard thing for scripting files like bash, python, etc.

#!/usr/bin/env dotnet-script
Console.WriteLine("Hello world");

This lets the operating system know what scripting engine handles this file.

If you you want to refer to a NuGet package within a script (*.csx) file, you'll use the Roslyn #r syntax:

#r "nuget: AutoMapper, 6.1.0"
Console.WriteLine("whatever);

Even better! Once you have "dotnet-script" installed as a global tool as above:

dotnet tool install -g dotnet-script

You can use it as a REPL! Finally, the C# REPL (Read Evaluate Print Loop) I've been asking for for only a decade! ;)

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\scriptie>dotnet script
> 2+2
4
> var x = "scott hanselman";
> x.ToUpper()
"SCOTT HANSELMAN"

This is super useful for a learning tool if you're teaching C# in a lab/workshop situation. Of course you could also learn using http://try.dot.net in the browser as well.

In the past you may have used ScriptCS for C# scripting. There's a number of cool C#/F# scripting options. This is certainly not a new thing:

In this case, I was very impressed with the easy of dotnet-script as a global tool and it's simplicity. Go check out https://github.com/filipw/dotnet-script and try it out today!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Exploring .NET Core's SourceLink - Stepping into the Source Code of NuGet packages you don't own

September 28, '18 Comments [13] Posted in DotNetCore | Open Source | VS2017
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According to https://github.com/dotnet/sourcelink, SourceLink "enables a great source debugging experience for your users, by adding source control metadata to your built assets."

Sounds fantastic. I download a NuGet to use something like Json.NET or whatever all the time, I'd love to be able to "Step Into" the source even if I don't have laying around. Per the GitHub, it's both language and source control agnostic. I read that to mean "not just C# and not just GitHub."

Visual Studio 15.3+ supports reading SourceLink information from symbols while debugging. It downloads and displays the appropriate commit-specific source for users, such as from raw.githubusercontent, enabling breakpoints and all other sources debugging experience on arbitrary NuGet dependencies. Visual Studio 15.7+ supports downloading source files from private GitHub and Azure DevOps (former VSTS) repositories that require authentication.

Looks like Cameron Taggart did the original implementation and then the .NET team worked with Cameron and the .NET Foundation to make the current version. Also cool.

Download Source and Continue Debugging

Let me see if this really works and how easy (or not) it is.

I'm going to make a little library using the 5 year old Pseudointernationalizer from here. Fortunately the main function is pretty pure and drops into a .NET Standard library neatly.

I'll put this on GitHub, so I will include "PublishRepositoryUrl" and "EmbedUntrackedSources" as well as including the PDBs. So far my CSPROJ looks like this:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
<PropertyGroup>
<TargetFramework>netstandard2.0</TargetFramework>
<PublishRepositoryUrl>true</PublishRepositoryUrl>
<EmbedUntrackedSources>true</EmbedUntrackedSources>
<AllowedOutputExtensionsInPackageBuildOutputFolder>$(AllowedOutputExtensionsInPackageBuildOutputFolder);.pdb</AllowedOutputExtensionsInPackageBuildOutputFolder>
</PropertyGroup>
</Project>

Pretty straightforward so far. As I am using GitHub I added this reference, but if I was using GitLab or BitBucket, etc, I would use that specific provider per the docs.

<ItemGroup>
<PackageReference Include="Microsoft.SourceLink.GitHub" Version="1.0.0-beta-63127-02" PrivateAssets="All"/>
</ItemGroup>

Now I'll pack up my project as a NuGet package.

D:\github\SourceLinkTest\PsuedoizerCore [master ≡]> dotnet pack -c release
Microsoft (R) Build Engine version 15.8.166+gd4e8d81a88 for .NET Core
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Restoring packages for D:\github\SourceLinkTest\PsuedoizerCore\PsuedoizerCore.csproj...
Generating MSBuild file D:\github\SourceLinkTest\PsuedoizerCore\obj\PsuedoizerCore.csproj.nuget.g.props.
Restore completed in 96.7 ms for D:\github\SourceLinkTest\PsuedoizerCore\PsuedoizerCore.csproj.
PsuedoizerCore -> D:\github\SourceLinkTest\PsuedoizerCore\bin\release\netstandard2.0\PsuedoizerCore.dll
Successfully created package 'D:\github\SourceLinkTest\PsuedoizerCore\bin\release\PsuedoizerCore.1.0.0.nupkg'.

Let's look inside the .nupkg as they are just ZIP files. Ah, check out the generated *.nuspec file that's inside!

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<package xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/packaging/2012/06/nuspec.xsd">
<metadata>
<id>PsuedoizerCore</id>
<version>1.0.0</version>
<authors>PsuedoizerCore</authors>
<owners>PsuedoizerCore</owners>
<requireLicenseAcceptance>false</requireLicenseAcceptance>
<description>Package Description</description>
<repository type="git" url="https://github.com/shanselman/PsuedoizerCore.git" commit="35024ca864cf306251a102fbca154b483b58a771" />
<dependencies>
<group targetFramework=".NETStandard2.0" />
</dependencies>
</metadata>
</package>

See under repository it points back to the location AND commit hash for this binary! That means I can give it to you or a coworker and they'd be able to get to the source. But what's the consumption experience like? I'll go over and start a new Console app that CONSUMES my NuGet library package. To make totally sure that I don't accidentally pick up the source from my machine I'm going to delete the entire folder. This source code no longer exists on this machine.

I'm using a "local" NuGet Feed. In fact, it's just a folder. Check it out:

D:\github\SourceLinkTest\AConsumerConsole> dotnet add package PsuedoizerCore -s "c:\users\scott\desktop\LocalNuGetFeed"
Writing C:\Users\scott\AppData\Local\Temp\tmpBECA.tmp
info : Adding PackageReference for package 'PsuedoizerCore' into project 'D:\github\SourceLinkTest\AConsumerConsole\AConsumerConsole.csproj'.
log : Restoring packages for D:\github\SourceLinkTest\AConsumerConsole\AConsumerConsole.csproj...
info : GET https://api.nuget.org/v3-flatcontainer/psuedoizercore/index.json
info : NotFound https://api.nuget.org/v3-flatcontainer/psuedoizercore/index.json 465ms
log : Installing PsuedoizerCore 1.0.0.
info : Package 'PsuedoizerCore' is compatible with all the specified frameworks in project 'D:\github\SourceLinkTest\AConsumerConsole\AConsumerConsole.csproj'.
info : PackageReference for package 'PsuedoizerCore' version '1.0.0' added to file 'D:\github\SourceLinkTest\AConsumerConsole\AConsumerConsole.csproj'.

See how I used -s to point to an alternate source? I could also configure my NuGet feeds, be they local directories or internal servers with "dotnet new nugetconfig" and including my NuGet Servers in the order I want them searched.

Here is my little app:

using System;
using Utils;

namespace AConsumerConsole
{
class Program
{
static void Main(string[] args)
{
Console.WriteLine(Pseudoizer.ConvertToFakeInternationalized("Hello World!"));
}
}
}

And the output is [Ħęľľő Ŵőřľđ! !!! !!!].

But can I step into it? I don't have the source remember...I'm using SourceLink.

In Visual Studio 2017 I confirm that SourceLink is enabled. This is the Portable PDB version of SourceLink, not the "SourceLink 1.0" that was "Enable Source Server Support." That only worked on Windows..

Enable Source Link Support

You'll also want to turn off "Just My Code" since, well, this isn't your code.

Disable Just My Code

Now I'll start a Debug Session in my consumer app and hit F11 to Step Into the Library whose source I do not have!

Source Link Will Download from The Internet

Fantastic. It's going to get the source for me! Without git cloning the repository it will seamlessly let me continue my debugging session.

The temporary file ended up in C:\Users\scott\AppData\Local\SourceServer\4bbf4c0dc8560e42e656aa2150024c8e60b7f9b91b3823b7244d47931640a9b9 if you're interested. I'm able to just keep debugging as if I had the source...because I do! It came from the linked source.

Debugging into a NuGet that I don't have the source for

Very cool. I'm going to keep digging into SourceLink and learning about it. It seems that if YOU have a library or published NuGet either inside your company OR out in the open source world that you absolutely should be using SourceLink.

You can even install the sourcelink global tool and test your .pdb files for greater insight.

D:\github\SourceLinkTest\PsuedoizerCore>dotnet tool install --global sourcelink
D:\github\SourceLinkTest\PsuedoizerCore\bin\release\netstandard2.0>sourcelink print-urls PsuedoizerCore.pdb
43c83e7173f316e96db2d8345a3f963527269651 sha1 csharp D:\github\SourceLinkTest\PsuedoizerCore\Psuedoizer.cs
https://raw.githubusercontent.com/shanselman/PsuedoizerCore/02c09baa8bfdee3b6cdf4be89bd98c8157b0bc08/Psuedoizer.cs
bfafbaee93e85cd2e5e864bff949f60044313638 sha1 csharp C:\Users\scott\AppData\Local\Temp\.NETStandard,Version=v2.0.AssemblyAttributes.cs
embedded

Think about how much easier consumers of your library will have it when debugging their apps! Your package is no longer a black box. Go set this up on your projects today.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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A command-line REPL for RESTful HTTP Services

September 25, '18 Comments [10] Posted in DotNetCore | Open Source
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HTTP REPLMy that's a lot of acronyms. REPL means "Read Evaluate Print Loop." You know how you can run "python" and then just type 2+2 and get answer? That's a type of REPL.

The ASP.NET Core team is building a REPL that lets you explore and interact with your RESTful services. Ideally your services will have Swagger/OpenAPI available that describes the service. Right now this Http-REPL is just being developed and they're aiming to release it as a .NET Core Global Tool in .NET Core 2.2.

You can install global tools like this:

dotnet tool install -g nyancat

Then you can run "nyancat." Get a list of installed tools like this:

C:\Users\scott> dotnet tool list -g
Package Id                 Version                   Commands
--------------------------------------------------------------------
altcover.global            3.5.560                   altcover
dotnet-depends             0.1.0                     dotnet-depends
dotnet-httprepl            2.2.0-preview3-35304      dotnet-httprepl
dotnet-outdated            2.0.0                     dotnet-outdated
dotnet-search              1.0.0                     dotnet-search
dotnet-serve               1.0.0                     dotnet-serve
git-status-cli             1.0.0                     git-status
github-issues-cli          1.0.0                     ghi
nukeeper                   0.7.2                     NuKeeper
nyancat                    1.0.0                     nyancat
project2015to2017.cli      1.8.1                     csproj-to-2017

For the HTTP-REPL, since it's not yet released you have to point the Tool Feed to a daily build location, so do this:

dotnet tool install -g --version 2.2.0-* --add-source https://dotnet.myget.org/F/dotnet-core/api/v3/index.json dotnet-httprepl

Then run it with "dotnet httprepl." I'd like another name? What do you think? RESTy? POSTr? API Test? API View?

Here's an example run where I start up a Web API.

C:\SwaggerApp> dotnet httprepl
(Disconnected)~ set base http://localhost:65369
Using swagger metadata from http://localhost:65369/swagger/v1/swagger.json

http://localhost:65369/~ dir
.        []
People   [get|post]
Values   [get|post]

http://localhost:65369/~ cd People
/People    [get|post]

http://localhost:65369/People~ dir
.      [get|post]
..     []
{id}   [get]

http://localhost:65369/People~ get
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8
Date: Wed, 26 Sep 2018 20:25:37 GMT
Server: Kestrel
Transfer-Encoding: chunked

[
  {
    "id": 1,
    "name": "Scott Hunter"
  },
  {
    "id": 0,
    "name": "Scott Hanselman"
  },
  {
    "id": 2,
    "name": "Scott Guthrie"
  }
]

Take a moment and read that. It can be a little confusing. It's not HTTPie, it's not Curl, but it's also not PostMan. it's something that you run and stay running if you're a command line person and enjoy that space. It's as if you "cd (change directory)" and "mount" a disk into your Web API.

You can use all the HTTP Verbs, and when POSTing you can set a default text editor and it will launch the editor with the JSON written for you! Give it a try!

A few gotchas/known issues:

  • You'll want to set a default Content-Type Header for your session. I think this should be default.
    • set header Content-Type application/json
  • If the HTTP REPL doesn't automatically detect your Swagger/OpenAPI endpoint, you'll need to set it manually:
    • set base https://yourapi/api/v1/
    • set swagger https://yourapi/swagger.json
  • I haven't figure out how to get it to use VS Code as its default editor. Likely because "code.exe" isn't a thing. (It uses a batch .cmd file, which the HTTP REPL would need to special case). For now, use an editor that's an EXE and point the HTTP REPL like this:
    • pref set editor.command.default 'c:\notepad2.exe'

I'm really enjoy this idea. I'm curious how you find it and how you'd see it being used. Sound off in the comments.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.