Scott Hanselman

Microsoft Build 2020 registration is not only open, it's FREE, it's LIVE, it's VIRTUAL, and it is all FOR YOU

April 30, '20 Comments [48] Posted in Win10
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Register for Microsoft BUILDMicrosoft Build 2020 is upon us, registration is open NOW. Stop reading this blog post and go register. I'll wait here.

Done? Sweet.

It's not the Build we thought it would be, but it's gonna be special. It's BUILD. Marketing says not to use ALL CAPS because it's Microsoft Build for them. For me, it's BUILD. It's BUILD at HOME. It's BUILD for YOU. It's BUILD for US. It's VIRTUAL BUILD.

A ton of folks are working hard to make Microsoft Build 2020 something special when it kinda feels like there's not a lot of special stuff happening.

It needs to be about humans as much as tech. More than tech. We build (BUILD!) stuff for each other - that's the whole point and sometimes it takes a situation like the one we're in to be reminded of that.

What are we building for you this year?

Microsoft Build 2020 will be 48 hours starting May 19th at 8am Pacific Time with Satya himself! Then - scandalously - I'm doing the opening keynote with some of my favorite people and wonderful colleagues who will join me in a parade of demos, technical context, continuous learning, innovation, and I'm sure my children will interrupt me even though the calendar is clearly marked BUILD (note the brand-violating ALL CAPS) because "do not disturb" means nothing these days! :)

Starting the 19th we'll kick off...

  • 48 hours of continuous learning
    • There's a TON of LIVE content and everything will be recorded so if you miss something LIVE you can catch up on YOUR schedule.
  • We are in your timezone
    • o    We’re bringing the experts to you – in your time zone! We'll do sessions 3 times (spread out every 8 hours) so you can spend time with the devs and PMs that build the stuff you use every day. No need to stay up until 2am, we'll do it for you. (Don't worry, we'll take the week off after! We're doing this because we love it.)
  • Enhance your learning with LIVE sessions - We'll have shorter and more LIVE sessions and then
    • Those starter sessions then will have longer recorded on-demand sessions to explore after the event. It's Netfl*x for Nerds.
  • Live Q&A with experts
    • Be sure to register (don't be anonymous) so you can do LIVE Q&A with the folks in the know
  • Community connections
    • Sometimes the best track at a conference is the Hallway Track and we want you to spend time with like-minded people in a positive environment so we'll have ways for you to self-organize and step into your own space to share and learn.
  • Registering for the event is your all access pass to all sessions
  • If you're a teacher, we'll even have content for your student and new learners!
  • 48 hour workshops with Build on Twitch
    • For a change of pace and style, we'll have your favorite Live Coders doing long form workshops (1-3 hours) LIVE on Twitch.

Whether you've got 30 min, an hour, or you've cleared your schedule and stay up for a few days with us, I know you'll have a great time. Microsoft Build 2020 will be unlike anything *I've* ever be involved in. I'm working hard with my friends to put together an unprecedented Developer Keynote for an unprecedented situation. Better yet, I get to be the opening act for ScottGu (look Ma, I made it), Rajesh Jha, and other Microsoft luminaries far above my pay grade.

I'm really proud of what we're working on and I'm looking forward to sharing it with you all. You're still reading? Nice. Go register for Microsoft Build 2020 and leave a comment below on what you want to see from us!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to Remote Desktop (RDP) into a Windows 10 Azure AD joined machine

April 21, '20 Comments [14] Posted in Win10
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Since everyone started working remotely, I've personally needed to Remote Desktop into more computers lately than ever before. More this week than in the previous decade.

I wrote recently about to How to remote desktop fullscreen RDP with just SOME of your multiple monitors which is super useful if you have, say, 3 monitors, and you only want to use 2 and 3 for Remote Desktop and reserve #1 for your local machine, email, etc.

IMHO, the Remote Desktop Connection app is woefully old and kinda Windows XP-like in its style.

Remote Desktop Connection

There is a Windows Store Remote Desktop app at https://aka.ms/urdc and even a Remote Desktop Assistant at https://aka.ms/RDSetup that can help set up older machines (earlier than Windows 10 version 1709 (I had no idea this existed!)

The Windows Store version is nicer looking and more modern, but I can't figure out how to get it to Remote into an Azure Active Directory (AzureAD) joined computer. I don't see if it's even possible with the Windows Store app. Let me know if you know how!

Windows Desktop Store App

So, back to the old Remote Desktop Connection app. Turns out for whatever reason, you need to save the RDP file and open it in a text editor.

Add these two lines at the end (three if you want to save your username, then include the first line there)

username:s:.\AzureAD\YOURNAME@YOURDOMAIN.com
enablecredsspsupport:i:0
authentication level:i:2

Note that you have to use the style .\AzureAD\email@domain.com

The leading .\AzureAD\ is needed - that was the magic in front of my email for login. Then enablecredsspsupport along with authentication level 2 (settings that aren't exposed in the UI) was the final missing piece.

Add those two lines to the RDP text file and then open it with Remote Desktop Connection and you're set! Again, make sure you have the email prefix.

The Future?

Given that the client is smart enough to show an error from the remote machine that it's Azure AD enabled, IMHO this should Just Work.

More over, so should the Microsoft Store Remote Desktop client. It's beyond time for a refresh of these apps.

NOTE: Oddly there is another app called the Windows Desktop Client that does some of these things, but not others. It allows you to access machines your administrators have given you access to but doesn't allow you (a Dev or Prosumer) to connect to arbitrary machine. So it's not useful to me.
Windows Virtual Desktop

There needs to be one Ultimate Remote Windows Desktop Client that lets me connect to all flavors of Windows machines from anywhere, is smart about DPI and 4k monitors, remotes my audio optionally, and works for everything from AzureAD to old school Domains.

Between these three apps there's a Venn Diagram of functionality but there's nothing with the Union of them all. Yet.

Until then, I'm editing RDP files which is a bummer, but I'm unblocked, which is awesome.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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A series of new YouTube Videos - Please Subscribe

March 31, '20 Comments [4] Posted in Musings | Win10
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Hey friends, in this time of remoteness, I've been making a lot more YouTube videos and they're pretty decent, IMHO. I'd love it if you'd subscribe, share them, and encourage your friends and colleagues to subscribe as well. Head over to https://youtube.com/shanselman and click Subscribe and then the BELL.

Here's just a taste of the kinds of videos I'm making. My main focus is How-To videos.

Scott's YouTube has a lot of interesting content

I'm enjoying doing videos on topics like:

If you have ideas for videos I can make that could help you out, please let me know in the comments! And subscribe!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to remote desktop fullscreen RDP with just SOME of your multiple monitors

March 26, '20 Comments [25] Posted in Win10
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I saw this over on the Microsoft Remote Desktop Uservoice

Allow ability to choose subset of local monitors for RDP session (full screen)

Allow ability to select a subset of current monitors with full screen. Currently can choose all or 1 but cannot choose for instance 2 of 3 (full screen).

That seems useful, I wish it did that. I know about this checkbox that says "Use all my monitors" but I can't say just use 1 and 2 but not 3, right?

Remote Desktop

Turns out that you CAN span n monitors but it's just buried/internal and has no UI.

Save your RDP file, and open it in Notepad. Everyone's RDP file is different but yours may look like this:

full address:s:x.x.x.x:3389
prompt for credentials:i:1
administrative session:i:1
screen mode id:i:2
span monitors:i:1
use multimon:i:1
selectedmonitors:s:0,1

I can put on selectedmonitors:s:x,y and then use the zero-based numbers to indicate my monitors. To get a list of monitors, I can run mstsc /l to LIST out all my monitors on my machine. I can also use mstsc /multimon as a command line to use multiple monitors.

MSTSC /l showing a list of my monitors

So I set my selectedmonitors:s:0,1 to use my left and middle monitor and skip my right one.

In this picture, I'm RDP'ed into a remote Windows 10 machine in Azure on Monitors 1 and 2 while Monitor 3 is my local one.

RDP on 1,2 and 3 is my local one

Sweet.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Windows Terminal 1.0 is coming - Update now and set up your split pane hotkeys!

March 20, '20 Comments [11] Posted in Win10
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The Windows Terminal is free and in the Windows Store and you should go make sure you have the latest update. The v0.10 is out and it's got a number of lovely quality of life improvements, not the least of which is Mouse Support!

Mouse Support

What's that mean, doesn't it already support mice? This means Text-Mode mouse support. So your apps like tmux and Midnight Commander can receive and react to mouse events, event when you're ssh'ed in remotely! That's because it's using VT (virtual terminal) textual commands under the covers.

Mouse Support for text mode is super useful if you use apps like Midnight Commander under Linux, or if you split plans with tmux.

Split Pane

You can change Windows Terminal in any way with themes, colors, gifs, key bindings and more. Many of you use screen or tmux under Linux and you can and should do that.

Terminal also supports splitting natively and for any shell (remember terminal != console != shell) and they just added a lovely splitMode=duplicate that makes a copy of the shell/profile in focus.

NOTE: You might consider starting with a fresh profile if yours is getting out of control.

{
"keys": ["ctrl+shift+d"],
"command": {
"action": "splitPane",
"split": "auto",
"splitMode": "duplicate"
}
}

Here's my whole keybindings section right now, including the part above.

"keybindings": [
{
"command": "closeTab",
"keys": ["ctrl+w"]
},
{
"command": "newTab",
"keys": ["ctrl+t"]
},
{
"command": {
"action": "splitPane",
"split": "auto"
},
"keys": ["ctrl+|"]
},
{
"keys": ["ctrl+shift+d"],
"command": {
"action": "splitPane",
"split": "auto",
"splitMode": "duplicate"
}
}
],

So I can split with ctrl+shift+d and get a copy of whatever is in front. I can use ctrl+| to get my default terminal, and I can use ctrl+shift+w to close the pane in focus, while ctrl+w close the current tab. Yummy.

Currently, the Terminal teams says they are fixing bugs to prepare for the release of v1. Windows Terminal v1 will be released in May!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.