Scott Hanselman

Looking for Senior Software Developer at Corillian

May 17, '06 Comments [19] Posted in ASP.NET | XML | HttpHandler | HttpModule | Tools
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We are looking to add a Senior Software Developer to our Consumer Banking team here at Corillian.  Are you "just the right person"?  If you are, then you fit the following description:

You know web development inside and out and can explain the HTTP protocol and HTML to your mother.

You have deep expertise with development using Microsoft ASP.NET.  You know the page event model, the control event model and the difference between a HTTPModule and a HTTPHandler and when each makes sense.

You understand how DOM and SAX parsers function, how XML schema works and how it is fundamentally different than database schema.

You know that TDD really means "write the test first"
 
You know how to read code, not just write code.

You are prepared to do what it takes to deliver value to the customer.

You work with others in an environment that encourages new ideas and improvement.

You have experience using a source control tool other than VSS.

You are willing to live in Portland, OR.  (To be a part of our team, you have to be here.  No telecommuting.)

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Thursday, 18 May 2006 03:29:14 UTC
Good luck finding someone for this position. I remember how many people I interviewed a couple years ago with similar criteria. It is amazing to me in this day and age how many developers have a superficial understanding of the tools and technologies they use everyday.
Thursday, 18 May 2006 04:00:13 UTC
Wow if you find this guy then good for you. I agree with Joe, there are developers, there are engineers and then there are passionate engineers. In order to meet your requirements this person really needs to be passionate and "love" their job in order to invest in keeping up to speed.
Thursday, 18 May 2006 04:42:03 UTC
I think I might fit the bill. Couple of questions first, what's TDD, DOM, and SAX? :)
Eric
Thursday, 18 May 2006 05:11:35 UTC
Certainly passion is a huge part of it, but basic competence, understanding of the software lifecycle and comp sci thinking as well as a good attitude is reasonable to expect in a *senior* engineer.
Scott Hanselman
Thursday, 18 May 2006 07:28:38 UTC
I fit all except last one :( Sad.
Aidas
Thursday, 18 May 2006 08:00:36 UTC
I almost fit (my mum can't use Word, so i abandon explanations ..) and i 'm too young to be considered as "Senior" (and i'm french but it's an advantage, isn't it ?)
Puchiko
Thursday, 18 May 2006 08:53:13 UTC
"You are willing to live in Portland, OR. (To be a part of our team, you have to be here. No telecommuting.)"

Everything made sense up until then.
Thursday, 18 May 2006 12:50:44 UTC
Any comments on how to get an entry level position? I have been a hobbyist for many years, and have written applications for the company I work for, but I am considered more of a tech support/fix-it guy. I am in school right now (part-time because I must support my family), and I am finding it really difficult to get a break to get an entry level position.

I really want to make programming my career and stop just having "jobs".
Thursday, 18 May 2006 14:49:26 UTC
Brandon, try visiting local user groups in your area. Check out http://www.ineta.org for a fairly comprehensive list of UGs. Start networking and you might be amazed what is out there and just not advertised. If nothing else, you can start to make a name for yourself amongst the programmers in your area.

Aaron

P.S. - Yes I am aware that most programmers are introverts, but keep in mind that most of the other guys at these things will be too - so don't be scared ;)
Aaron Prenot
Thursday, 18 May 2006 14:51:47 UTC
Scott, if only this would have been up 6 weeks ago. Would love to come to work for Corillian but I just started a nice new job elsewhere. *-sigh-*

Aaron
Aaron Prenot
Thursday, 18 May 2006 15:31:45 UTC
Scott,
If I’m a full time developer working for you, which would you prefer: me completing my work on time, adhering to best practices and being a great team player … or me being able to recite a bunch of technical jargon (that’s really only applicable in a small percentage of most projects), always being late on projects because I like to implement new ways of doing things because I read about them on blogs and always debating with other team members about what the best practice should be? I don’t think that you’re company is being unreasonable with looking for someone who fits this mold, however you must keep in mind that a lot of these skills are specific to the nature of your business. So just because one can’t recite everything there is to know about a HTTPModule or a HTTPHandler does not make him/her a weak developer.

“It is amazing to me in this day and age how many developers have a superficial understanding of the tools and technologies they use everyday.” IMHO being a good developer means that you have a solid foundation in the principles of programming. So regardless of the environment, IDE, or standards imposed a good developer will be successful. To me it’s lame to invest so much valuable time in learning all the intricate details of a technology that will be replaced within the next 3 - 5 years … I’m sure that my ASP 2.0 certification from 2001 is pretty useless right now.
GMoney
Thursday, 18 May 2006 17:49:52 UTC
I predit you'll receive no less than 30 qualified applicants willing to relocate.
DeanG
Thursday, 18 May 2006 19:52:09 UTC
Scott,

I am looking for two such people. Sr. Web Developer and Sr. Software Eng. to work with me in finance industry with very intereting large scale PROJECT.

When you find one, could you send him/her my way. Thanks.

Person should have creator/inventor mentallity, not a follower.
Adnan
Thursday, 18 May 2006 20:05:44 UTC
GMoney - you said "If I’m a full time developer working for you, which would you prefer: me completing my work on time, adhering to best practices and being a great team player … or me being able to recite a bunch of technical jargon (that’s really only applicable in a small percentage of most projects)"

Um.....Yes? I'd like both. This "technical jargon" is totally applicable to this project. I'd like you to know this stuff as well as get your work done on time.
Scott Hanselman
Thursday, 18 May 2006 20:49:18 UTC
At my old company we had 2 names for people who got their work done on time while adhering to best practices and being a great team player, even though they may not know all the technical jargon: 1) Employee 2)Junior Programmer.

Quite honestly I think many people have developed a somewhat skewed idea of what constitutes a Senior Programmer. To me a senior programmer should be someone who understands what he is doing and WHY he is doing it. Knowing the what without the why means you won't understand when your approach is inappropriate for the task at hand. Having 10 or 20 years of programming experience means nothing if it is 10 or 20 years of programming DailyWTF entries.
Thursday, 18 May 2006 23:09:49 UTC
If you'd posted this three months ago I might still be living in Portland. ;-)
Chris Tavares
Friday, 19 May 2006 00:50:43 UTC
Joe,

I agree with you 100%. I also think Sr. dude has to be involved in business decisions and guide the company in proper implementation of solutions. Has to adjust to business needs. A person with strong backgound and business know how and sense, and understanding execs is a good developer who can add tremendous value to any company. This guy needs to be able to get his hands dirty and wear a tie when needed.

Would you like your house painted by just painter or a painter who can guide you better, educate you and even suggest?

He is the glue binding the development team and the company!
Adnan
Saturday, 20 May 2006 01:24:48 UTC
"You know how to read code, not just write code."

how about:

You know how to write readable code.


Saturday, 20 May 2006 03:10:33 UTC
experience
1. .Net since beta 1, august 2000
2. . source control .. subeversion
3. Xml, we do DSL with XML schema, generate codes using xsd. XmlSpy is the tool
4. automation, NAnt and msbuild
5. TDD, was on NUnit until version 2.2.1 or 2.2.2 not on Team Test
6. no NCover but Clover before Team Test
7. Spoken to you a few times in the past, the last time may be 3 years ago
mename
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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.