Scott Hanselman

Free ASP.NET Core 1.0 Training on Microsoft Virtual Academy

October 27, '16 Comments [20] Posted in ASP.NET
Sponsored By

This time last year we did a Microsoft Virtual Academy class on what was then called "ASP.NET 5." It made sense to call it 5 since 5 > 4.6, right? But since then ASP.NET 5 has become .NET Core 1.0 and ASP.NET Core 1.0. It's 1.0 because it's smaller, newer, and different. As the .NET "full" framework marches on, on Windows, .NET Core is cross-platform and for the cloud.

Command line concepts like dnx, dnu, and dnvm have been unified into a single "dotnet" driver. You can download .NET Core at http://dot.net and along with http://code.visualstudio.com you can get a web site up and running in 10 minutes on Windows, Mac, or many flavors of Linux.

So, we've decided to update and refresh our Microsoft Virtual Academy. In fact, we've done three days of training. Introduction, Intermediate, and Cross-Platform. The introduction day is out and it's free! We'll be releasing the new two days of training very soon.

NOTE: There's a LOT of quality free courseware for learning .NET Core and ASP.NET Core. We've put the best at http://asp.net/free-courses and I encourage you to check them out!

Head over to Microsoft Virtual Academy and watch our new, free "Introduction to ASP.NET Core 1.0." It's a great relaxed pace if you've been out of the game for a bit, or you're a seasoned .NET "Full" developer who has avoided learning .NET Core thus far. If you don't know the C# language yet, check out our online C# tutorial first, then watch the video.

image

And help me out by adding a few stars there under Ratings. We're new. ;)


Sponsor: Do you deploy the same application multiple times for each of your end customers? The team at Octopus have taken the pain out of multi-tenant deployments. Check out their latest 3.4 release!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb
Thursday, 27 October 2016 03:51:22 UTC
Good tutorial, waiting for the next.
Alex
Thursday, 27 October 2016 05:31:51 UTC
<sigh> please, enough with the videos already. Can't print them for future reading, have to watch the whole thing through to find out if there is some miniscule bit of important information, and it's slooooow. I'm sorry, I do appreciate the hard work put into all this, but seriously, we're not all 14 year old, not everything has to be a video...
El Dorko
Thursday, 27 October 2016 06:58:02 UTC
Good to know I'm not the only one who does not like all these videos...
Nadav
Thursday, 27 October 2016 08:34:01 UTC
Thanks for this Scott, I have been avoiding .net Core until things settled down a bit more but will be watching this.
Thursday, 27 October 2016 10:29:48 UTC
Hi Scott,

We are about to kick off a new project and I wanted to start on .Net Core and VsCode. I like the move to the JavaScript style of development. And I like to code on my Mac. VsCode is so much more responsive than any IDE.

Unfortunately, I found that it's a bit too early for me. It starts to fall apart when you want to go beyond "hello world" projects. I love TDD and BDD. SpecFlow&Nunit didn't fly, found a workaround, which involved introducing an xproj file next to my project.json with lots of visual studio stuff in it. Still didn't fully work the way I wanted, started to look for SpecFlow alternatives... Gave up, back to good old Visual Studio... Maybe I'm missing some stackoverslow questions or blogposts yet to come.

I really like this innovation, the future is coming, but not yet there.
Pavel
Thursday, 27 October 2016 12:06:04 UTC
@El_Dorko, text you can find here: https://docs.asp.net/en/latest/tutorials/index.html
Alex
Thursday, 27 October 2016 15:01:55 UTC
@El_Dorko, you do realize everyone learns differently, right. Many people learn much better from a visual medium. Like @Alex pointed out, there's plenty of written tutorials as well, so choose the medium that works best for you. Personally, I'm really glad that there's as much emphasis on video as on text now.
wekempf
Thursday, 27 October 2016 18:48:29 UTC
Great work Scott! Thank you so much for putting the time into this. Makes it super clear and easy to understand. I've been trying to stay informed about current innovations without getting too much into it (similar situation to @Pavel). With this video I was able to get a console app and a web server up and running in lest than 30 min! I'll stay tune for more.
Thursday, 27 October 2016 21:06:49 UTC
This is a very cool initiative. Much appreciated. Thanks very much.
Dave
Thursday, 27 October 2016 22:21:55 UTC
@Pavel

I hear what you're saying. I work full time on POSIX and I struggled with anything beyond simple stuff with Core, you can do things but my productivity level just dropped significantly. FWIW I switched back to Mono, it's not as smooth as .NET on Windows but I've found it easier than Core in terms of tooling, my blog is mostly about .NET on Linux if that's what you're interested in.
Friday, 28 October 2016 07:12:22 UTC
This is interesting will have to check it out.

Honest question - why would anybody running Windows use VS Code instead of VS 2015? What does the former do or do better than the latter?
Peter
Friday, 28 October 2016 07:31:03 UTC
Thank you so much Scott. Going through the course. Its very helpful. Waiting for the next.
Friday, 28 October 2016 10:05:16 UTC
Where can you find the intermediate tutorial? :)
Niels
Friday, 28 October 2016 19:35:21 UTC
@Peter

I also wonder why anyone would use VS Code on Windows when you can get VS Community Edition for free. If I'm missing something please enlighten me.
Jason
Saturday, 29 October 2016 23:39:22 UTC
@Peter @Jason I prefer using VS Code on Windows for some things and Visual Studio (proper) for other things. For example, I have enjoyed playing around with ASP.NET Core 1.0 and NodeJS on VS Code because it seems more light weight and it abstracts less of what is going on. When I'm learning something new, I appreciate understanding more of the underlining details. But if I'm doing something else, for example WPF development, nothing else but Visual Studio will do.
Saturday, 29 October 2016 23:42:25 UTC
Scott, it would be great if there was a way to "subscribe" to a notification of new videos.
Tuesday, 01 November 2016 17:33:32 UTC
I appreciate these videos. I, personally, love watching tutorial videos. I don't try to code along (usually) but I love to soak up the over all idea and then apply it to my own hello world application. Although the majority of this video was not new for me, I am one that loves to know how everything works and I love how you started with "dotnet new" and then building on top of that.

Keep up the amazing tutorials and content!
Brian
Sunday, 06 November 2016 17:48:02 UTC
Scott, you said it's 3 days tutorial. Where is the other two?
Sunday, 20 November 2016 23:41:06 UTC
I loved it! Hope to see the next one in the series soon out. Please make more courses like this for other topics as well, like other .net applications. :-) Thank you so much!! :-D
Kenneth Soerensen
Tuesday, 22 November 2016 17:32:02 UTC
Hi Scott! Nice video!
During the EF demo and Logging/Diagnosticss you say that you would cover EF and Dependecy Injection with more details in the next videos, were are they?
Paolo Ramos
Comments are closed.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.