Scott Hanselman

Introducing Visual Studio Code for Windows, Mac, and Linux

April 29, '15 Comments [78] Posted in ASP.NET | VS2015
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Screen Shot 2015-04-28 at 11.33.49 PM

What a wonderful time to be developer. I'm down here at the BUILD Conference in San Francisco and Microsoft has just launched Visual Studio Code - a code-optimized editor for Windows, Mac, and Linux and a new member of the Visual Studio Family.

Visual Studio Code (I call it VSCode, myself) is a new free developer tool. It's a code editor, but a very smart one. It's cross-platform, built with TypeScript and Electron, and runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux.

Visual Studio Code has syntax highlighting for dozens of languages, the usual suspects like CoffeeScript, Python, Ruby, Jade, Clojure, Java, C++, R, Go, makefiles, shell scripts, PowerShell, bat, xml, you get the idea. It has more than just autocomplete (everyone has that, eh?) it has real IntelliSense. It also as IntelliSense for single files like HTML, CSS, LESS, SASS, and Markdown. There's a huge array of languages that Visual Studio Code supports.

IMHO, the real power of this editor is its project IntelliSense for C#, TypeScript, JavaScript/node, JSON, etc. For example, when an ASP.NET 5 application is being edited in Visual Studio Code, the IntelliSense is provided by the open source projects Roslyn and OmniSharp. This means you get actual intelligent refactoring, navigation, and lots more. Visual Studio Code's support for TypeScript is amazing because it has JavaScript and TypeScript at its heart.

Visual Studio Code has git support, diffs, interesting extensibility models through gulp, and is is a great debugger for JavaScript and Nodejs apps. They are also working on debugging support for things like the .NET Core CLR and Mono on all platforms.

This a code-focused and code-optimized lightweight tool, not a complete IDE. There's no File | New Project or visual designers. If you live and work in the command line, you'll want to check free tool out.

You can download Visual Studio Code now at http://code.visualstudio.com.

They'll be blogging at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vscode and you can email them feedback at vscodefeedback@microsoft.com and follow them at @code.

Download Visual Studio Code and check the the docs to get started. Also note the docs for ASP.NET support and Node.js support. Visual Studio Code is a preview today, but it's going to move FAST. It automatically updates and will be updating in weeks, not months.

And here's some screenshots of Visual Studio Code because it's awesome. Code what you like, how you like, on what you like, and you can run it all (by the way) in Azure. ;)

Screen Shot 2015-04-28 at 11.17.59 PM

Screen Shot 2015-04-28 at 11.28.35 PM

 
image

Have fun!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Running Suave.io and F# with FAKE in Azure Web Apps with Git and the Deploy Button

April 27, '15 Comments [7] Posted in Azure | Open Source
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I was told by some lovely folks in the F# community that there is a nice web framework called Suave.io. Best name ever, eh? Suave is a clean, lightweight, and very F#y (pronounced F-Sharp-ie, I say) in its syntax.

Frameworks like this do well when they are easy to deploy, especially for Hello World. I always find that if a framework can quickly and easily give me a sense of accomplishment I'll be more likely to stick with it. I like to "fall into the pit of success."

I wanted to see if I could make Suave on Azure work easily as well. With the help of Steffen Forkman and the encouragement of the F# community (who have felt historically that support for F# in Visual Studio and Azure has been lacking) I put this little proof of concept together. I used the HttpPlatformHandler that is available in Azure Web Apps now by default, along with a basic Kudu Deployment Script from my Ruby/Middleman post.

Most of the F# community uses a NuGet alternative called Paket that is more F#-friendly. There's also a tiny Paket.Bootstrapper so I could curl things down, then run Paket like this, as part of an Azure Web App deployment. This script modified from Steffen:

@echo off
cls

mkdir .paket
REM TODO - might want to do an IF EXISTS *or* a SHA check
curl https://github.com/fsprojects/Paket/releases/download/1.2.0/paket.bootstrapper.exe -L --insecure -o .paket\paket.bootstrapper.exe

.paket\paket.bootstrapper.exe prerelease
if errorlevel 1 (
exit /b %errorlevel%
)

.paket\paket.exe restore
if errorlevel 1 (
exit /b %errorlevel%
)

Then we need web.config to tell Azure Web Apps (IIS8+) to start FAKE to get F# and Suave going. Note the use of %HOME%, full paths and the %HTTP_PLATFORM_PORT%:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
<system.webServer>
<handlers>
<remove name="httpplatformhandler" />
<add name="httpplatformhandler" path="*" verb="*" modules="httpPlatformHandler" resourceType="Unspecified" />
</handlers>
<httpPlatform stdoutLogEnabled="false" stdoutLogFile="fake.log" startupTimeLimit="20" processPath="%HOME%\site\wwwroot\packages\FAKE\tools\FAKE.exe"
arguments="%HOME%\site\wwwroot\build.fsx port=%HTTP_PLATFORM_PORT%">
<environmentVariables>
<environmentVariable name="WhateverYouLike" value="GoesHere"/>
</environmentVariables>
</httpPlatform>
</system.webServer>
</configuration>

I added logging but it's off by default. You can use it to debug if you have issues, as the FAKE.exe output will go into a series of log files. You can then access them with the Kudu debug console.

I like running "azure site log tail YOURSITE" with the Azure Cross Platform command line. It lets me see the deployment and output as it happens.

FAKE and F# in Azure Web Apps

Here is Steffen's build.fsx:

// --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
// FAKE build script
// --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#r @"packages/FAKE/tools/FakeLib.dll"

open System
open System.IO
open Fake

Environment.CurrentDirectory <- __SOURCE_DIRECTORY__

// Step 2. Use the packages

#r "packages/Suave/lib/net40/Suave.dll"

open Suave // always open suave
open Suave.Http.Successful // for OK-result
open Suave.Web // for config
open Suave.Types
open System.Net

let port = Sockets.Port.Parse <| getBuildParamOrDefault "port" "8083"

let serverConfig =
{ defaultConfig with
bindings = [ HttpBinding.mk HTTP IPAddress.Loopback port ]
}

startWebServer serverConfig (OK "Hello World! It's Suave.io on Azure Websites. <a href='https://github.com/shanselman/suavebootstrapper'>So easy to setup. Just click Deploy.</a>")

I just added the Azure Deploy button to my Readme.md like this. This is markdown, of course, but could be HTML

[![Deploy to Azure](http://azuredeploy.net/deploybutton.png)](https://azuredeploy.net/)

And you can try this yourself by visiting the repository here and pressing Deploy to Azure, or hit it here:

Hopefully this is a decent clear start towards easily deploying F# Web Apps to Azure via Git, and/or the Deploy Button.

Your thoughts?


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Bad UX and User Self-Blame - "I'm sorry, I'm not a computer person."

April 24, '15 Comments [36] Posted in Musings
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You're evil, little man.In my recent podcast with UX expert and psychologist Dr. Danielle Smith the topic of "user self-blame" came up. This is that feeling when a person is interacting with a computer and something goes wrong and they blame themselves. I'd encourage you to listen to the show, she was a great guest and brought up a lot of these points.

Self-blame when using technology has gotten so bad that when ANYTHING goes wrong, regular folks just assume it was their fault.

My dad got some kind of evil "PC Tech Hotline" on his machine today because some web site told him his "Google was out of date and that he should update his Google." So he did. And he feels super bad. Now, in this case, it was a malicious thing so it would be really hard to figure out how to solve this for all users. It's like getting mugged on the way to your car. It happens to the best folks in the best situations, it can't always be controlled. But it shouldn't cause the person to blame themselves! He shouldn't fear his own computer and doubt his skills.

People now publically and happily self-identify as computer people and non-computer people. I'll meet someone at a dinner and we'll be chatting and something technical will come up and they'll happily offer up "Oh, I'm not a computer person." What a sad way to separate themselves from the magic of technology. It's a defeatist statement.

Get a Tablet

Older people and people who are new to technology often blame themselves for mistakes. Often they'll write down directions step by step and won't deviate from them. My wife did that recently with a relatively simple (for a techie) task. She wanted to record a lecture with a portable device, load the WAV onto the PC, even out the speech patterns, save it as a smaller file (MP3), then put it in Dropbox. She ended up writing two pages of notes while we went over it, then gave up after 30+ min, blaming herself. I do this task now.

Advanced users might say, you should get your non-technical friend a tablet or iPad. But this is a band-aid on cancer. That's like saying, better put the training wheels back on. And a helmet!

Tablets might get a user email and basic browsing and protect them from basic threats, but most also restrict them to one task at a time. And tablets have hidden UX patterns as well that advanced users use, like four-fingered-swipes and the like. I've seen my great aunt accidentally end up in the iPad task switcher and FREAK OUT. It's her fault, right?

 Um....

This harkens back to the middle ages when the average person couldn't read. Only the monks cloistered away had this magical ability. What have we done as techies to make regular folks feel so isolated and afraid of all these transformative devices? We MAKE them feel bad.

There used to be a skit on Saturday Night Live called "Nick Burns, Your Company's Computer Guy" that perfectly expresses what we've done to users, and to the culture. Folks ask harmless questions, Nick gives precise and exasperated answers, then finally declares "MOVE." He's like, just let me get this done. Ugh. Stupid Users. Go watch Nick Burns, this is a 19 second snippet.

I basically did this to my own Dad today after 45 min of debugging over the phone, and I'm sorry for it.

I'm not a techie

When users blame themselves they don't feel safe within their own computer. They don't feel they can explore the computer without fear. Going into Settings is a Bad Idea because they might really mess it up. This UX trepidation builds up over the years until the user is at a dinner party and declares publically that they "aren't a computer person." And once that's been said, it's pretty hard to convince them otherwise.

Googling: Why are users so...and google recommends "stupid"

Even Google, the most ubiquitous search engine, with the most basic of user interfaces can cause someone to feel dumb. Google is a huge database and massive intelligence distilled down to a the simplest of UI - textbox and a button. And really, it's just a textbox these days!

But have all had that experience where we google for something for an hour, declare defeat, then ask a friend for help. They always find what we want on the first try. Was it our fault that we didn't use the right keywords? That we didn't know to not be so specific?

I think one of the main issues is that of abstractions. For us, as techies, there's abstractions but they are transparent. For our non-technical friends, the whole technical world is a big black box. While they may have a conceptual model in their mind on how something works, if that doesn't line up with the technical reality, well, they'll be googling for a while and will never find what they need.

Sadly, it seems it's the default behavior  for a user to just assume its their fault. We're the monks up on the hill, right? We must know something they don't. Computers are hard.

How do YOU think we can prevent users from blaming themselves when they fail to complete a task with software


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Windows 10 - The Fast Ring and BUILD 10061

April 23, '15 Comments [23] Posted in Win10
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Take a moment, if you will, and please subscribe to my YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/shanselman. I've actually got quite a bit of content over there, most recently a series of Microsoft Word and Office How-To videos.

However, I've also been installing each new Fast Ring build of Windows 10 on real hardware and been going over the changes for you! Today Windows 10 Technical Preview Build 10061 came out.

I've put my Windows 10 Technical Preview "Build-To-Build" YouTube Playlist up here and I encourage you to check it out. Windows 10 daily builds are still quite rough in spots, but that's part of the fun of getting these almost-daily builds. I wouldn't put this on my main machine, and I haven't. But, I do have a few extra laptops and have been keeping up to date with Windows 10, looking for changes and updates between builds.

Below is my playlist and today's video on Windows 10 Build 10061 and the changes I've noticed.

Have you installed Windows 10 on any machines? What's your reaction been so far?

Related Links


Sponsor: Big thanks to our friends at Raygun for sponsoring the feed this week. I use Raygun myself and I encourage you to explore their stuff, it's really something special. Get full stack error reporting with Raygun! Detect and diagnose problems across your entire application. Raygun supports every major programming language and platform - Try Raygun FREE!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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UPDATED for 2015: How to install the nodejs Ghost blog software on Azure Web Apps (and the Deploy to Azure Button)

April 20, '15 Comments [8] Posted in Blogging | nodejs | Open Source
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What? Didn't I blog about this before? Yes, in fact, in 2013 I did an article showing how to get Ghost - a lovely nodejs-based blogging app - running on Azure.  The instructions involved making some changes to Ghost itself to make it friendlier to Azure and doing a git deploy. Since this post both Ghost AND Azure have become friendlier. ;)

Fast forward two years and the instructions have changed! In fact, they've gotten WAY easier. You can still theoretically follow most of my old instructions, but these new ones are WAY better, so just do it this way.

STEP 1

There's a "Deploy to Azure" button up at http://deploy.azure.com that you can get an put in YOUR GitHub project's Readme.md so folks can easily and quickly deploy your app as well!

Here's what you do. Head over to the GitHub repository for Ghost Azure. Click Deploy to Azure. That will automatically install Ghost for you in Azure.

The Deploy to Azure Button

The Deploy.Azure.com website will look at the repository from the HTTP Referer header. You'll end up with a nice form like this.

DO make sure to double check your settings, the Site Location is alphabetical right now, and you may not want your blog in Brazil. ;)

image

Hit Next, then check the summary that will warn you what's getting created, then hit Deploy. Boom. Azure will actually run through the template and setup Ghost (or whatever app you wanted) automatically.

  • Note it's setting it up from Source Control as well, although you can certainly change this. For example, you might want to Fork it yourself, and then Deploy.
  • However, as this is set up today, you won't get updates until you go to Deployments within the Azure Portal and click Sync. You decide if you want the app to update when new code is committed.

After it's created, you can manage your site in the Azure Portal. I made a little free one for this example, as can you if you like.

Ghost in the Azure Portal

And it works just great!

Ghost running on Azure

It's not super obvious what to do next. You'll need click the little chevron there, or visit something like /admin, and you'll get redirected to the Ghost setup process online.

image

Now you can start your first post!

My first post in Ghost

What's going on here?

Felix Rieseberg added a few files to Ghost and has the fork up here on GitHub. The most interesting one is the AzureDeploy.json. This is an Azure Resource Manager template. Here's another simple example from Elliot Hamai for an ASP.NET MVP app. This file tells Azure (and the Deploy to Azure button) what kinds of things it needs to create and actually gives the system enough information to build a whole form for you!

Maybe this is the perfect time for you to start your own blog! Perhaps you've been putting it off. Go check out my FREE two-hour documentary movie with Rob Conery called Get Involved in Tech! We will get you ready to jump into the world of Social Software Development.

Here's a video of Elliot and I talking about the Deploy to Azure button on Azure Friday. Here's Elliot's blog announcing Deploy to Azure and explaining more.

Remember that Ghost is open source and you can learn more at https://ghost.org!

DON'T WANT TO SIGN UP FOR AZURE? You can try Azure out for an hour without signing up for anything. Check out http://try.azurewebsites.net. You can make a PHP, Java, nodejs, Python, ASP.NET web app, or even setup Ghost itself. You can also try out Visual Studio online, which is basically a complete IDE in your browser written entirely in JavaScript.


Sponsor: Big thanks to our friends at Raygun for sponsoring the feed this week. I use Raygun myself and I encourage you to explore their stuff, it's really something special. Get full stack error reporting with Raygun! Detect and diagnose problems across your entire application. Raygun supports every major programming language and platform - Try Raygun FREE!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.