Scott Hanselman

Windows 10 is coming...here's what to tell non-technical parent

July 1, '15 Comments [21] Posted in Screencasts | Win10
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Windows 10 is coming on July 29th! I've been doing Build to Build videos on my YouTube showing what's changing and how it will affect you.

I got a request to do a video showing Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10 and how to reserve your upgrade, as well as a little demo of the Start Screen. Here's that video!

NOTE: I apologize for the mediocre audio. I had a microphone failure and ended up using the laptop microphone for the last part because I was excited to get the video out. It's not representative of the quality I'm known for, and it won't happen again.

Are you the IT manager for your extended family? Will you be upgrading non-technical parent to Windows 10 or letting them do it themselves? Sound off in the comments below.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro Micro-HDMI not working? Easy fix.

June 23, '15 Comments [28] Posted in Hardware
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Micro HDMI sucks.This blog post is likely not for you, unless it totally is. Which is why I'm posting it.

My Dad's Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro was driving him batty for months. It was bugging me even more, as I am the assigned IT manager for my family. I'm sure you are also, as you're reading this blog, right?

Anyway, I talk this computer up for months, he gets the computer, and it has this tiny Micro-HDMI connector.

Let me just say that Micro-HDMI is the most evil of all display connectors. I mean, it literally does everything wrong.

Micro-HDMI sucks because:

  • Micro-HDMI looks like Micro USB and I can't explain to my Dad that they are different.
  • Micro-HDMI is the most fragile of all ports. If you blow on it you'll lose signal.
  • It's like the tiny shorty soda pop can of Tab. It's not Diet Coke. It's not enough. It's useless.

Which brings me to the point. His didn't work. Never worked. I tried new drivers, flashing BIOS, new cables, jiggling the connector, everything.

Except the obvious - cutting up the cable.

It turns out that many cables (especially cheap ones from Amazon) don't expose enough metal to make a decent connection.

Take a razor blade and cut a good millimeter around the cable's rubber housing to expose more metal.

Yep, I cut the cableCut around the cable. Remove 1mm or so.

Boom. It works immediately. Dad's thrilled. I'm a good son again and Micro-HDMI continues to suck as a display connector.

Full-sized HDMI or Mini-DP (Display Port) from now on, my friends.

Please, regale me in the comments with tales of why YOU too hate Micro-HDMI, Dear Reader.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to use Process Monitor and Process Explorer

June 20, '15 Comments [19] Posted in Screencasts
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I was chatting with Phil Haack today about a weird little bug/feature we were seeing in GitHub for Windows. I don't have the source code for the application, but I wanted to explore what was going on and get some insight so I could give Phil a decent bug report.

He and I spent some time on Skype sharing screens today and he commented "we should be recording this." So I went back and did just that.

Please take a moment and Subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: http://youtube.com/shanselman

In this short video I remind folks how Procmon and ProcExp work, how powerful they are and I learn some interesting things about GitHub for Windows!

Let me know if you find short videos like these useful, and if you do, suggest topics in the comments!

Also, a reminder, if you've got non-technical family or friends who want help with Windows 8, give them a YouTube Playlist designed just for them! http://hanselman.com/windows8

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Historical Debugging, Profiling, New Diagnostic Tools in Visual Studio 2015

June 17, '15 Comments [17] Posted in VS2015
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The full range of .NET 2.0 through 4.6 in Visual Studio 2015I've been working with Visual Studio 2015 lately, even for older projects. You can create and edit all kids of .NET app from .NET 2.0 all the way up through .NET 4.6, as well as ASP.NET 5 apps on the Core CLR.

In my case I've been doing some pair programming with Mark Downie on DasBlog, the blog system that runs this blog right here. DasBlog is very old, and used to be very actively developed. The question "is DasBlog dead" is asked a lot, but the answer is really "DasBlog is done." For years it has been very feature-full and feature-complete. However, this blog has been running on .NET 2.0 for years. Mark and I thought it would be nice to upgrade DasBlog to .NET 4.6, so we did. We've also moved DasBlog over to GitHub. You'll find it at http://github.com/shanselman/dasblog.

Now, to be clear, DasBlog was amazing in 2004 and 2008 but it's aging now. Mark and I think that's the fun of it, though. Mark's added Twitter Card and Facebook Open Graph support, and together we've fixed a few oddities and bugs that have popped up in the leap from 2.0 to 4.6. However DasBlog remains idiomatic .NET 2.0 which means it's C# 2.0, and doesn't even make good use of Linq or generics. We're thinking about a few updates, moving the Templating system to RazorEngine, updating to Linq queries, smarter threading for collections, better caching, as well of Mark's ideas around social.

You might think it's weird to use Visual Studio 2015 to work with a .NET 2.0 app, but it's useful to remember that you get to use new Visual Studio features even with older frameworks. One of the most useful new features is the Diagnostic Tools toolbox. It's a boring name for an amazing new part of VS. I'm not sure what they could call it other than Diagnostic Tools, but it's insanely convenient.

Diagnostics Tools in Visual Studio 2015

Often we think of Debugging and Profiling as two separate activities, and honestly, I talk to developers all the time that have never Profiled an app. They know that Profiling exists as a tool and a concept, but for whatever reason they forget about it, don't get around to it, or haven't adopted it as a fundamental part of their daily workflow.

The Diagnostic Tools in Visual Studio 2015 bring in data from a number of sources, Breakpoints, the Debugger, Tracing and Debug out, as well as Intellitrace Events and Historical Debugging (on supported SKUs).

Notice in the screenshot above, I can even see a little tip showing how many milliseconds has elapsed between two breakpoints. It's little features like this that take data that has long been available but not in front of your face. Why dig for it?

You can see how many milliseconds between calls

I can even go back in time with Historical Debugging. See how I can backup and see the state of Local Variables and the Call Stack when I'm at a Breakpoint?

Historical Debugging

If you have a SKU with IntelliTrace, you can get extra info if you'd like to enable Historical Debugging.

IntelliTrace

See how I've got Memory and CPU graphs, and I didn't have to do anything? This pops up automatically when Debugging:

Diagnostic Tools gives you all these lovely charts

I can take Memory Snapshots, go to the next Breakpoint, take another and compare!

Memory Snapshots

If you've got Visual Studio 2015 and haven't started using these tools, I'd suggest you start exploring. They're useful enough that they've got me using VS2015 RC for all my projects, even older .NET 2.0 ones.

NOTE: Remember that Visual Studio Community is free for Open Source projects, and supports extensions! http://www.visualstudio.com/free

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Visual Studio Web Development Tip - Add Chrome Incognito Mode as a Browser

June 17, '15 Comments [38] Posted in VS2015
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Here's a little Visual Studio web development tip that I've been using lately. You know how Visual Studio picks up your installed browsers and has them available as a dropdown list?

List of Browsers in Visual Studio

I found it very useful when debugging to add Google Chrome's Incognito Mode as a browser of its own.

Pull down the chevron and click Browse With...

Browse With Menu

Add Chrome from either it's standard or user location:

  • System: C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\
  • User: C:\Users\UserName\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\Application

Then add --incognito as command line switch and name the browser something like "Google Chrome - Incognito."

You can do the same thing with Firefox and Internet Explorer.

Here I'm adding Internet Explorer with the -private option.

Internet Explorer Private mode

This is a useful thing for developers if you're doing anything with cookies or caching and you've found yourself clearing the cache or browser history a lot.

Added Internet Explorer Private Mode to Visual Studio

Question for you dear Reader - Is this a feature you would want by default? Would you want not just every browser added, but also the Private Mode for each as well?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.