Scott Hanselman

Something Wicked This Way Comes...Thinktecture

May 9, '04 Comments [0] Posted in ASP.NET | Web Services
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Isn't this a harbinger of something?

  • Ralf Westphal:  With only one day to go, I´d say I´m at the door step of an exciting new phase of my professional life. After 12 years of leading my own software company, then after 6 years of freelance work, now from tomorrow on I´ll be part of a new effort where the whole is larger than the sum of its parts.  Although I love to be independent, this team truely is very special, vibrating with ideas, motivation and enthusiasm - and also fun to work with!
  • Christian Weyer:  So, yes, I found this team I talked about earlier on. When you add their work up, it becomes truly impressing. It's amazing. Just one more day for all the details.
  • Christian Nagel: Web Services, ADO.NET, Enterprise Services, .NET Remoting, ASP.NET, Windows Forms, Indigo, Longhorn…. A team with 13 books, 150 articles, 120 conference talks gets together.
    More details tomorrow.
  • Ingo Rammer: There are things, which I just couldn't do on my own.
And a newly minted URL: http://www.thinktecture.com registered to one Ingo Rammer.  Looks like my favorite two Germans and two Austrians are planning to take over the world?
We will find out tommorow!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Reflector and Big Fonts

May 8, '04 Comments [0] Posted in ASP.NET | Bugs
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Note that Reflector 4.0 supports not only /fontsize: but also /fontname:! 

So, reflector /fontsize:14 /fontname:"Lucida Console" :)

Kudos to Phil Scott for creating an add-in for Reflector that increases the font size to something suitable for presenting to a class. And further kudos for keeping the post up after being informed via a comment that it's simply a command-line setting. Thanks Phil! I learned something new today too!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Upgraded to dasBlog 1.6

May 7, '04 Comments [3] Posted in ASP.NET | DasBlog | XML
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Had a lovely (and easiest yet) upgrade to dasBlog 1.6, thank Omar.  I used the Upgrade Zip file that is up on GotDotNet.

Not only is this version faster it also added an Archive feature.  Look in the left bar under Navigation, there's a 'Archives' section with Monthly Archives for all my content.  Don't forget the Search box also!

Note: The upgrade zip is missing the FreeTextBox CodeHighlightDefinitions.xml so I stole it from Omar directly.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Using Internet Explorer on High Resolution Displays

May 7, '04 Comments [2] Posted in Musings
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I'm slowly catching up on blog posts (amazing how 7000 entries will go by when you're out of the country for a month!) and I'm noticing that Omar got his Toshiba M200, and as I also own one, I checked out his post.

The M200 (and M205) has the distinction of having a ridiculously high-resolution (1400x1060) display on a very small screen (12").  Since I've been laser'ed, you might thing I run small fonts.  Oh, no!  If you know me, you know I'm ALL about the giant fonts. 

I noticed in Omar's recent posta pointer to this secret registry key that makes Internet Explorer prettier on high-resolution displays.  I haven't decided if I like it better yet, but I'm going to run it for a few week and see how I feel.

Add the UseHR Registry Entry

The UseHR value is added to the Main key under "Internet Explorer" as follows:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER
Software
Microsoft
Internet Explorer
Main
UseHR= dword:00000001

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Scott's Diabetes Explanation: The Airplane Analogy

May 6, '04 Comments [5] Posted in Diabetes
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I was talking with a friend and they asked some question about my insulin pump or something and I realized I’d never explained diabetes to him.  I did, and he said, “you explained this in 15 minutes better than it’s ever been explained to me. You should blog it.”

So I have a place to point people (and you do too!) here’s:

The Basics:

There are two types of Diabetics:

  • Type I – also called Juvenile Diabetes or Youth-Onset or Insulin Dependant (IDDM).  These folks ALWAYS use Insulin.  If someone says “I’m Type I” you know theyinject insulin.
  • Type II – also called Adult-Onset or Non-Insulin Dependant (NIDDM)

They are so different it’s a shame they are both called Diabetes.

  • Type I – Typically these folks don’t produce any (or much) of their own insulin.  If I don’t make it, I need to get it somewhere.
  • Type II – These folks typically have decreased responsiveness to their own insulin.  If they aren’t using their own insulin well, they need to be made more sensitive to it.  As with any drug, the more you take, the more you need.  If you’re a big carbo eater your whole life, you’ll produce a lot of insulin, and chances are you’ll eventually become resistant to your own insulin.

“Worldwide, there are about 171 million diabetics, but only about 10 percent of those have Type 1 diabetes. The vast majority have Type 2 diabetes, which is linked to obesity. In the United States, about 900,000 to 1.8 million people have Type 1 diabetes, the American Diabetes Association says.” [Wired]

The Airplane Analogy

 You are flying from L.A. to New York. You have to maintain a consistent altitude the whole way.

Note: For this analogy we will focus on a good cruising altitude and pretend that taking off and landings aren’t important.

Food raises blood sugar (altitude.)  Insulin lowers it.  Non-diabetics don’t have to think about altitude, as you all have a working pancreas (autopilot) and don’t sweat altitude.  Diabetics, on the other hand, have to constantly wonder if they are at a safe altitude.  Staying at a consistently high altitude (high blood sugar) will eventually make you sick; while a low altitude (low blood sugar) will kill you quickly.  

When I prick my finger to check my blood sugar with a glucose test strip, that’s an altitude check.  I want to know how I’m doing.  Each time I do it, it costs about 70 US cents.  So, I can only afford about 200 test strips a month, which is about 7 finger pricks a day.

Each time I feel I need to lower my blood sugar, I take insulin.  In the old days I took a manual shot by measuring the insulin and filling the syringe by hand.  I would typically take about 5 or 6 shots a day.  Now I have an insulin pump that’s attached to me 24 hours a day.  I attach it with a needle to a new place every 4 days or so.  I have a remote control that tells it what to do. I keep the whole thing in my pocket with a tube leading under my clothes. 

Note: I’m always asked if an insulin pump does things automatically.  Answer: I wish.  It is delivery only.  I have to “close the loop.”  There are currently no publicly available closed-loop systems that automatically test blood sugar AND deliver insulin.  Not yet.

Here’s where the analogy gets interesting.  Remember in the analogy we are flying from L.A. to New York, except we only get to check our altitude seven times.  And, we only get to change altitude (take insulin) less than ten times.  But, when I check my blood sugar, I’m actually seeing the past.  I’m seeing a reading of what my blood sugar was 15 minutes ago.  And, when I take insulin, it doesn’t start lowering my blood sugar for at least 30 minutes.

Now, imagine yourself in that plane with an altimeter that shows you the altitude 15 minutes in the past, and a yoke that changes the altitude – but when you press on the yoke, your altitude won’t change for a half-hour.  It would be a challenging trip. 

Kind of reminds one of the delays in controlling the Mars Rover by remote, eh?  This is what Type I diabetes is like.  It’s a daily “chasing of one’s tail.”  This is why I prefer to eat at Subway when I’m in NYC or SFO.  It’s consistent.  I can count on it.  I know how much insulin to take for a Steak & Cheese.  Believe me, I’d love to eat new kinds of food every time I visit a new city, but I’d have to discover how much insulin to take and that’s and exhausting series of calculations and trial & error.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.