Scott Hanselman

Doom 3 - Too Scary!

August 9, '04 Comments [4] Posted in Programming
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Sweet Lord, I don't know how I'm going to sleep.  Doom 3 is scaring the CRAP out of me.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Protect your PC...

August 8, '04 Comments [0] Posted in Musings
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Here's a great link I'll be giving my family: www.microsoft.com/protect

It will automatically turn on the Windows Firewall and setup the Automatic Updates to download and install.  This will mean one less trip for me to everyone's house to install Windows SP2!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Free Tablet PC from .NET Rocks...

August 3, '04 Comments [3] Posted in Musings
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Ah, yes, I think I shall head over to .NET Rocks and give them a little personal info and a small survey in order to win this TabletPC.  Don't tell anyone though, as you'll change the odds!  Contest ends in three weeks.

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Oh yes, it kicks much booty - Just ripped my whole CD Collection to MP3 with RipDigital

August 3, '04 Comments [12] Posted in Musings
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I'm sorry my friends, but darnit, I'll spent a buck it if will save me time and hassle.  Ripping CDs was en vogue back in the day, but I've got hundreds and I'm sorry, there's no way I'm going to sit and swap discs.

So, I sent my stack (pictured at right) to RipDigital.com and they sent me back DVDs with all my music on them.  I had mine ripped at 224kpbs CBR MP3, but they'll even do lossless if you're an audiophile

The whole process was fantastically smooth.  They sent me that box and CD Spindle (pictured) and an already filled out FedEx slip.  Put the CDs on the Spindle and drop the FedEx box at work in the mail room.  A week later (I'm in Portland and they are in New York) the DVDs and my CDs (insured for $1000) showed up.

I love it when a plan comes together.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Wesner's thoughts on Collection versus List

August 2, '04 Comments [3] Posted in NDoc
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Wesner offers his thoughts on my question, What's the difference between System.Collections.Generic.Collection and System.Collections.Generic.List?

I think there are two possible reasons.

  • Collection<T> appears to be a replacement for CollectionBase, which provided virtual methods to detect insertions, deletions and changes.
  • The new List class no longer provides any virtual methods as did the original ArrayList for performance reasons..
    [Wesner Moise]

He also educates us on some of the differences between List<T> and the 2.0 ArrayList.

  • List<T> does not use any virtual methods. As a result, a number of methods such as the list indexer methods can now be inlined.
  • With the default constructor, List<T> and Whidbey ArrayList do not allocate any memory for its items, so an empty list represents a very compact object--comparable in size to an empty array. (8 bytes for Array, 12 bytes for List, 16 bytes for Whidbey ArrayList) It uses the empty array trick that I wrote about in an earlier post. In contrast, earlier versions of ArrayList would allocate space for 16 items by default.
  • The initial buffer size when an item is actually added is 4 items not 16 as before.
  • List<T> returns an struct-based enumerator, so that iterating through foreach now involves no memory allocations at all.
    [Wesner Moise]

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.