Scott Hanselman

Addressing a PDF at the Page Level with an URL

October 7, '04 Comments [0] Posted in Musings
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Here's one of those "I figured it must be possible but never tried" kind of things.

You can address a page in a PDF like this.  You can also have named bookmarks/destinations:

<a href="http://www.mydomain.com/myPDF.pdf#page=6">Link text</a>

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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For the Love of All That is Holy, Go Home and BACKUP Today

October 7, '04 Comments [2] Posted in Musings
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I spoke about my storage problem earlier this year. Charlie Kindel, via Chris Sells, describes his own storage problem with more fidelity that I could have.  I look forward to his Part II. 

I "solved" my storage problem with an Iomega REV Drive and 4 disks.  It's a start, to at least get it backed up and off site.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Big Ups to Peter Blum

October 7, '04 Comments [2] Posted in ASP.NET | XML
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Scott Mitchell gives credit to Peter Blum. It’s true; there just aren’t enough one-man shops like Peter’s out there. Peter gives fantastic tech-support, has impeccable documentation, and provides a ridiculous amount of value in his controls. His validation controls or without peer, and his new security controls are amazing. Get to know Peter and his controls.

Just wanted to give praise to Peter Blum and his ASP.NET server controls over at PeterBlum.com (some free, some for sale).  I have used Peter's Date Package on a small personal project about a year ago, which was quite useful.

I've mentioned before how verbose I tend to be, but my verbosity is nothing compared to Peter's documentation.  For the Date Package there's a PDF document with nearly 200 pages of documentation (installation instructions, setup, documentation, examples, etc.).  Insane.  (Admittedly, I've read about four pages in total - it's pretty easy to figure out how to get the controls to do the simple stuff.  There is a lot of added features, though, that I've yet to have time to explore.) [Scott on Writing]

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Word of Mouth means more these days...

October 7, '04 Comments [6] Posted in Ruby | Speaking
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Gordon Weakliem had an interesting comment on Malcolm Gladwell's book on Sam Ruby's blog:

...the phrase "[The Internet] dramatically speeds up the rate at which reputation spreads by word of mouth" seems to be a key.

I find this to be particularly true with the advent of blogging.  I was speaking to a users group recently and Chris Sell's name came up, and the question was posed "how did he become so famous?" Some people had read his book, some had read his blog, and others had seen him speak. But the general consensus was, via word-of-mouth, that Chris was a good enough fellow. No doubt he has been mentioned in e-mails, quoted in USENET posts, and held up as an example of a highly competent developer and clever architect.

This begs the obvious question, if there was no Internet, how long would it have taken for a Chris Sells (or Don Box, or Clemens, or Sam Ruby, or Dare Obasanjo, or anyone in an obscure technical vertical as ours) to become "well known and thought of."

I don't think it can be underestimated how quickly word-of-mouth spreads on the Internet. It would be interesting to have a race between a rumor and a virus. The rumor would be propagated only by humans, and the virus competes programmatically. I suspect it would be pretty close.

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Reminder: I'm at SouthColorado.NET tommorow...anyone want to drive me?

October 5, '04 Comments [0] Posted in ASP.NET | Learning .NET | Web Services | Speaking
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I'm speaking at SouthColorado.NET tomorrow at ~5:30pm-ish doing the Zen of .NET thing.  It is always a fun talk and I hope I won't waste your time.

It's going to be cutting it a bit close though, so if there's anyone who is in Colorado and:

1. wants to get me at the Denver Airport and drive together to the Springs around 3pm
    OR
2. if you're in the Springs and you want to get me at the Springs Airport and RACE to the event.

It's at:

University of Phoenix
5475 Tech Center Drive
Colorado Springs, CO

Then, please email me at my work scott A-T- corillian.com.

See you there! By Taxi or by kindness, I will be there!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.