Scott Hanselman

More Talk about Certification from an MC*.*

April 10, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | Gaming
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So I guess the point of all this rambling is that it is easy for those of us who are authors, speakers, etc., and who have years of experience under our belts to make light of the utility of certifications, and to be annoyed when we see the those 3- and 4-letter marks of the certified. But I try hard not to forget that absent certification, it's entirely possible that I would still be building scenery somewhere, and still struggling to pay my bills.[Andrew Duthie]

This whole certification thing sure is an interesting discussion.  I seem to remember having the same talks a few years back when the MCSD came out.  I still stand by my previous (last week) opinion on certification.  If Mort wants a certification, more power to Mort. But, when it comes time to choose the team, Mort had better have a resume like Elvis or Einstein. 

I hear what Andrew is saying, there but for the grace go I.  I got the MCP in '93 or '94 and felt pretty darn good about it.  But did it kick of the whole thing for me?  I think it was passion for technology that did it.  It was the TI/89A and the Apple II. It was the Commodore PET and the TRS(Trash)-80.  It was caring so much about an elegant solution that I'd stay up nights refactoring perfectly operational big ball of mud code.

I'm not trying to down play the paper - as Rebecca Dias says, documents are central to life.  Why else would I be on my 11th year of my Software Engineering degree? (Reminder: June 6th is Graduation!)  Something in myself says that THAT is a piece of paper I really want to have.  I wouldn't mind it if Mort had a B.S. or M.S. and a few MC*.*s, as well as some experience under his belt, not to mention the ability to grok and ephiphanize.

I'm getting off on a rant here, but here's the real rub - there are a lot of people in the technology industry who got in for the quick dot-com-dollar.  Certainly the industry can't support this many people can we?  Certification may be a great way to stay in the game, but, I mean, there's the whole competence issue to deal with.  80% of the world business logic runs in Microsoft Excel for Pete's Sake.  .NET is fantastic, but Visual Studio drag and drop can make bad programmers WORSE faster than ever.  I know lots of people who are certified that I woudn't hire. 

A great example of why I take certification with a grain of salt is a friend at work who is a biscuit away from his PhD...in History - and, he's a fantastic, brilliant, talented, completely uncertified engineer.  And darnit if he doesn't ship good code to production.

Bottom line, certification, degrees, experience, are each just checkboxs on a long list of qualifications.  Full stop.

private short mytwocents[2];
Scott

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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At-A-Glance: XmlReader vs. XPathNavigator vs. XmlDocument

April 9, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | XML
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This is a great at-a-glance view of the XML options that .NET makes available to Developers.  [From Aaron Skonnard's article by way of Don Box]

CHOICES
PROS
CONS
XmlTextReader
-Fastest
-Most efficient (memory)
-Extensible
-Forward-only
-Read-only
-Requires manual validation
XmlValidatingReader
-Automatic validation
-Run-time type info
-Relatively fast & efficient
(compared to DOM)
-2 to 3x slower than XmlTextReader
-Forward-only
-Read-only
XmlDocument (DOM)
-Full traversal
-Read/write
-XPath expressions
-2 to 3x slower than XmlTextReader/XmlValidatingReader
-More overhead than XmlTextReader/XmlValidatingReader
XPathNavigator
-Full traversal
-XPath expressions
-XSLT integration
-Extensible
-Read-only
-Not as familiar as DOM
XPathDocument
-Faster than XmlDocument
-Optimized for XPath/XSLT
-Slower than XmlTextReader

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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.NET Framework 1.1 Redistributable is out...

April 9, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services
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.NET Framework 1.1 Final Bits. Looks like the final .NET Framework 1.1 bits are available: ... [Larkware News]

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Google as proof of my Burning Ears?

April 8, '03 Comments [1] Posted in Musings
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I've had the good fortune, for what it's worth, of being the first Hanselman, the first Scott Hanselman, and the 80th Scott ;) on Google for a while now.  So, basically, if you REALLY want to find me, you can.  There's really no excuse if you remember my last name. 

I walked into a few meetings last week and received the whole "Speak of the devil..." or "Your ears must be burning."  Every day or so I notice someone in my referrers list who arrived by searching Google for "Scott Hanselman." 

So, I see a few possibilities:

  • There are a lot of Scott Hanselman's (I know of four, a baseball player, a web designer, me, and a Canadian) out there and every once in a while they search for themselves for some reason.
  • There are a lot of Scott Hanselman's out there and OTHER people are searching for those guys
  • Someone out there was thinking about me and my ears should have been burning as they searched Google

From this very cogent logic, I have determined that my ears can no longer feel the burning.  Clearly, I'll need to see someone about this.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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InfoPath supports only Document Literal - That's not lame at all!

April 6, '03 Comments [3] Posted in Web Services | XML | Tools
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Astoundingly lame: InfoPath 2003 has become the first alleged Web Services tool I've worked with that can't consume Cape Clear's Airport Weather Web Service. Point InfoPath at http://live.capescience.com/wsdl/AirportWeather.wsdl and what you get back is "InfoPath cannot work with this Web Service because it uses RPC encoding. Only document literal encoding is supported." So much for the wide support of XML standards they're always promising. [Larkware]

Mike thinks that InfoPath is lame since it can't do RPC Enc.  I submit that creating a forms/document-centric view of an RPC endpoint would be icky at best.  Since InfoPath (and Microsoft and others) see the world of XML messaging as a document-centric one, it makes sence that this new forms creation tool would only speak Doc Lit.  Frankly, I'd have been disappointed if it DID support RPC encoding.  If it did, wouldn't it be a development tool?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.