Scott Hanselman

Scoble Sucked Into Redmond...Film at Eleven. Schwoop! (That's the sucking sound)

April 15, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services
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Looks like Scoble is going to work for Microsoft as a TE to work for Robert Hess, a guy I see on Alaska Airlines' shuttles all the time . Congrats to Scoble!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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VB.NET programmers getting screwed? and other thoughts...

April 15, '03 Comments [1] Posted in Web Services
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Eight Ways to Earn More Money

If you're wondering how to make the big bucks as a Visual Studio developer, here are some handy tips to guide you. You can effect some positive salary changes by considering these options:

  1. Learn C#. C# developers earn more than Visual Basic developers—$26,000 more per year, according to this year's survey results.
  2. Pursue certifications in desirable areas. One certification that packs a salary punch is the Microsoft Certified Solution Developer (MCSD). MCSDs earn about $10,000 per year more than the average developer's salary.
  3. Consider an advanced degree. MBAs earn a highly respectable $98,200 per year, on average. The undergraduate degree you acquire also counts salary-wise—BSCS grads earn nearly $14,000 per year more than graduates with a BA.
  4. Get more work experience.
  5. Switch to a management track. 
  6. Move where the jobs are.
  7. Work for a public or private company. 
  8. Become a consultant.
    [
    Visual Studio Magazine]

Not to be too negative, but I found numbers 1, 2, and 3 to be particularly interesting.  Each of them are the Mob Mentality...some how folks think if enough people say the same thing, people think it makes it right.  Clemens astutely noticed that even if 686,000 people say something, they're still wrong.

1. Ouch, what are VB.NET programmers, lepers?[1] Some of the best programmers I know are VB.NET folks.  I can see how Mort might assume that a curly-braced and semi-coloned language some how makes you smarter, but newsflash - it {doesn't};   I've started mixing code up in my presentations just to remind folks that you can do 99% of everything you need to with VB.NET.  I like hopping back and forth between languages during demos, reminding people about cross language inheritance.  I like downloading samples from GotDotNet and CodeProject without worrying what language it's in.  I even found myself recently working on WSE code for the upcoming Windows Launch (Stop by and say Hi to me in Seattle!) and I was several hours into it before I realized I was coding VB.NET.  Learn one, then learn the other.  There's little excuse to not know both.  Then, go learn Managed C++. Syntactic sugar, people.

2. This is more of the same.  Certification isn't an accurate score of competance in the field.  If you really want to impress me, let's see some percentiles scrores! ;)  Fred Jones, MCSD/99%, MCDBA/71% anyone?  Guess I won't be hiring Fred for that DBA job, eh?  Should I start including my English SATs when I write articles?  How about my Mensa membership?  Certs are nice to have, they were fun to collect when I was an item writer, but an extra $10K a year for a few hours in an exam room?  Oy vay.

3. Sheesh, who doesn't have an MBA these days?  With the proliferation of the Virtual MBA, employers will have to pay more attention to the school.  Do we really think an MBA from Northwestern offers the same skills as the Virtual MBA? (Only $99.95!) 

Also, number 8.  Seems to me that the smart consultant, given this economy, should be looking for full time work, or at least a LONG term contract.  The hussling one has to do as a totally independant consultant must be exhausting.

Seems to be that the good advice is to be had in items 4 and 6.

[1] Interesting Note: As of this writing, searching Google for "VB.NET lepers" resulted in exactly ZERO results.  I shall forever be ashamed at bringing these two words together, but I shall be heartened when a persecuted VB.NET programmer, feeling leper-like, searches Google and finds my words of inspiration.  You go, sir, and you write that VB.NET code that will ultimately be generated into IL, just like your better-paid brother Abel.  It's OK!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Best use of "primogeniture" in a Weblog

April 14, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | Speaking
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Wow, Grady. To think all that brainpower produces such amazing insight. (Wrong insight, too--unless he's speaking of a few very minor things, these two environments are evil twin brothers separated at birth and fighting over primogeniture.) I guess this is what happens when you're so far removed from what the rest of the world is doing that you lose touch with reality. [The Mountain of Worthless Information]

Scathing and fabulous blogging from Ted today.  I laughed out loud, mostly because he was right on.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Gunderloy's a freakin' stud

April 11, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | Speaking
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The Daily Grind 47. Ah, the nectarine tree is in bloom, the asparagus is pushing up (yum!), and it didn't get below freezing last night. It's days like this that I remember exactly why it is that I retired from the flying-around-the-country-and-consulting-and-speaking ratrace. If I ever make enough money to retire, this Internet connection goes too. Meanwhile, though, I'm still cruising around as I work. ... [Larkware News]

Gunderloy's a freakin' stud.  I appreciate the Daily Grind more than my daily breakfast of Diet Pepsi and Smarties.  Keep up the great service Mike, every Daily Grind (especially this one) makes me more productive. 

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Reporting, and dynamically creating PDFs from .NET

April 11, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | ASP.NET
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Here's a great piece of work off GotDotNet for dynamically generating PDF files with .NET.  I can see this being very useful for reporting in ASP.NET.  I'm consistantly amazed at the ammount and quality of useful code that the .NET Community creates.

Another great online resource is the Reporting Starter Kit at the Asp.NET site.  It includes examples in C# for dynamic generation of charts and graphs in memory from ASP.NET and same very englightening DataBinding examples, including Master/Detail, and Drilldown.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.