Scott Hanselman

NUnit 2.1 discussion at the Portland XP Users Group and later in Seattle

May 5, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | Speaking | NUnit
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Looks like Charlie Poole is speaking the Portland Extreme Programming (XPUsers Group on Tues, May 6th.  Charlie will be talking about NUnit 2.1.  Charlie's a fun guy, and the folks in the XP Users Group are hardened, battle-tested engineers.  If you want to know how Test Driven development can change your world, you should check it out.  If you're in Seattle, Charlie will present on Thurs, May 8 at the Seattle XP Users Group.

 Charlie says:

"NUnit is an open source unit test framework for .Net. We're about to release version 2.1 and I'll talk about new as well as old features. Some of the new things include a much cooler and more responsive gui, various option settings, the ability to load and test multiple assemblies, the ability to save and reload test projects with support for multiple configurations, opening Visual Studio projects directly and more accessible information about individual test results in the gui.

Once you grasp the idea behind it, unit testing as used in test-driven development is a beautifully simple concept. But some things present hard problems: GUI, multi-threading, etc. What can we do about these? This talk is based on material that's part of my tutorial "Advanced Unit Testing Techniques for .NET" being presented at XP2003 in Genoa this month and also for the book I'm working on. I'll outline some key tricks that apply  everywhere and show some code for specific issues."

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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More .NET Zen Koans + Visual Studio.NET 2003/Windows Server 2003 launch in Boise

May 2, '03 Comments [2] Posted in Web Services | Tools
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Thanks to everyone who attended the Boise Launch for Visual Studio.NET 2003/Windows Server 2003.  I've posted the slides on this site, so here's the link to last weeks Seattle Launch.  You'll find all the code and slides there, as well as mentions of all the tools I used in the decks.

For those of you who dug my original .NET Zen Koans here are the new ones:


I'm twenty nine years
And always sought the
Way of the
Framework.
Well, this morning we passed
Like strangers on the road.


Whenever a object is created,
Be aware of it,
As soon as you are
aware of it,
It will vanish.
If you remain for a
long period
Forgetful of objects,
You will naturally become unified like the .NET Framework.
This is the essential art of Computer Zen.


People think it is hard to see .NET,
but in reality
it is neither difficult nor easy.
It is a matter of responding
to C# and VB.NET while remaining detached
from the runtime,
living in the midst of managed code yet being detached from managed code, seeing without seeing, hearing without hearing, garbage collecting without garbage collecting.


One minute of sitting,
one inch of Buddha,
one line of code.
Like lightning all thoughts come and pass.
Just once look
into your mind-depths:
Now look it up on MSDN.


However deep your
knowledge of the .NET Framework,
it is no more
than a strand of hair in the vastness of space.
However important seeming your object model,
it is but a drop of water in a deep ravine.


How profoundly silent is the .NET Framework!
Boundless and infinite,
it is the dwelling place
of the divine.
Rich classes with properties and methods are flourishing and spreading.
Forgetful of words I roam and rest here.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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The greatest website on the 'net for the travelling wonk. Full stop.

May 2, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Musings
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SeatGuru.com may well change my life! Thank the heavens!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Don't change your public contract

May 2, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | XML
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Jon is blogging the CTO Forum.  He includes a great summary of Adam Bosworth's talk, but a few concepts/quotes from Bosworth stood out to me.

Public contracts. You can change your operating system, you can change your object model, but don't change your public contract. We know this works. "The proof point is the web."

Message-driven model. We need a programming model for message-driven programming. How does a developer write code in that environment? "It's no problem for systems programmers, but for everybody else, it's a challenge to make it easy for them to write apps that wake up when a message comes in."

The more I think about information architecture, specifically web services public interfaces (currently in the concrete form of WSDL, but mostly in my head) the more I grok the importance and usefulness of immutable public contracts.  Which gets me thinking about the tribulations involved in versioning...I certainly don't want to get the habit of names like SonOfWebServiceEx2.  This has led me to Yasser (don't all things like to Yasser? :) ) and his article that touches on the subject, as well as Scott Seely's article on evolving an interface.  I haven't yet decided if I agree with Matt Powell's belief that XmlElement can make life that much better...he agrees that it doesn't promise to make it easier.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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InfoPath 2003 and the use of ProgIds in XML PIs (Processing Instructions)

April 30, '03 Comments [2] Posted in Web Services | XML
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Office 2003 XML Shell Extension.
I also noticed that Office 2003 must've installed some shell helper for XML files, because when I saved the file to my desktop, the shell peeked inside the XML file and gave me an XML document icon with the Excel icon overlaid across the upper left corner. I wonder why the file opened in my browser on double-click instead of into Excel...[
The .NET Guy]

I noticed this as well. Office seems to achieve this cute bit of functionality by inserting a PI into the XML instance document which the shell extension just scans all .XML files for to determine if the file should be opened with a specific Office application. The PI looks like this:
     <?mso-application progid="InfoPath.Document"?>
[
Drew's Blog]

Isn't it interesting that ProgIds continue to be used like this, as a component identifier?  Is the use of a ProgId kosher in a .NET world?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.