Scott Hanselman

Big Picture of XML or Diagram of a Big Ball of Goo?

June 23, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | XML
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Which Are The Core XML Technologies That Matter?. I stumbled on the The Big Picture of the XML Family of Specifications which lists a large number of technologies that are related to XML in one way shape or form. It seems some people take a look at the diagram and it gives them the impression that XML is too complex after all, just look at all those specs. An interesting fall out of this has been that some fellow B0rg have posted their opinions on what they consider the core of XML. [Dare Obasanjo aka Carnage4Life]

<brainstorming>
You know, this Big Picture is mostly fabulous. It's a great reference (perhaps a potential T-Shirt?), but it really DOES look a lot more complex that XML feelsOn the downside, while this giant document may be a fairly complete list of specs, when you look at it from a Tuftetian point of view, it doesn't make any useful qualitative judgements that we can infer via position.  If you apply Don's "kernel of XML" thoughts to a diagram like this, it would need to take into consideration the size and position of the boxes in perhaps a family tree, or perhaps a modified Venn Diagram.  It'd be nice if the a new diagram took into consideration time and dependancy, with sizes derived from relative importance (based on dependance).
</brainstorming>

Anyway, whether XML is complex, or not complex, or more complex than COM ever was, I care not.  XML just naturally feels right to me. (Remember to linger across the ee's in feels with the appropriate emphasis :)  Complexity doesn't always imply level of difficulty or demand that one impugn.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Brummesque?

June 20, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services
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More bloggers...fellow RD Jon Box is up and running, as well as Eric Gunnerson.  Welcome!  

Eric's first post was about his Robot Vacuum...I look forward to more compelling Brummesque content from this Program Manager on the C# team. ;) <g>

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Quote of the Day

June 19, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Musings
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Everyone once in a while someone says something that makes me fall off my chair...today:

"Yeah, I heard this new rapper, he says he's the white Eminem."

And dammit if this kid doesn't ACTUALLY EXIST. It's takes some serious grapes to call yourself the White Eminem.  Anyway.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Understanding why your updated images don't immediately get served to Browser Clients

June 17, '03 Comments [2] Posted in Web Services | XML | Tools
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This is a complex topic, but here's a cursory explanation:

 

The Web Server, in this case IIS, sets Content Expiration info and information about then things are modified in the HTTP Headers.  If you ask for something from the Web Server, but you say "only if modified since..." they will pass back “Not-Modified” HTTP Headers to the Browser. You can see this even when hitting F5 to refresh the browser if you use a tool like ieHTTPHeaders (http://www.blunck.info/iehttpheaders.html) .  Look at IE Content Expiration in the Properties. 

Most folks like to have a “/images” folder that has SEPARATE Content Expiration settings and static content, or many levels of image volatility.

 

You have a few possible solutions:

 

·         Have volatile (often changing) images stored in one folder and set to expire immediately or on your specific schedule. 

·         Have the Browser user press CTRL-F5 to “blow through the cache”…F5 in IE will NOT fetch updated images until they expire. Pressing CTRL-F5 will keep the browser from including “If-Not-Modified” – which is equivalent to saying “get it anyway.”

·         Check the GET requests of your images in the HTTP Headers to see when they will expire...then wait. ;)

·         If you are generating the images yourself (dynamically generated on the server side) then you control the headers, so you can force updates by writing the appropriate headers yourself.

A picture named image001.jpg

Notice in this screen shot that even though I pressed F5, the Web Server responded “This image hasn’t been modified!”

A picture named image002.jpg

Even more, this request from the browser specified “Only give me this image if it’s been modified since a certain date.”

A picture named image003.jpg

The moral of this story is, you'll never know the WHY of the behavior of your system unless you know both the HOW of the HTTP Spec and the QUIRKY HOW of the browser whose behavior you're examining.

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.