Scott Hanselman

On the road and still more Web Services DON'Ts

August 21, '03 Comments [1] Posted in Web Services | XML
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We've just arrived in Hong Kong and we're wireless again.  I'd post another picture, but it would look just like the last one except we'd be more tired and have Chinese writing behind us.

On a technical note, we're continuing to run into more Web Services No-No's.  This time it was interfacing .NET with a "legacy" Apache-SOAP implementation.  Oy vey.  It insisted on a custom Apache encoding style ala:

<ns1:SomeMessage xmlns:ns1="urn:UpdateSubUser" SOAP-ENV:encodingStyle="http://xml.apache.org/xml-soap/literalxml">

So, in the tradition of writing Soap Extensions we are ashamed of :) my CTO whiped up an custom attribute "XmlForceEncoding" that allows this madness to occur.  Also, the Web Services we were consuming was using the XSD spec from 1999, rather than 2001, so that was special.

Here's some things Chris and I learned (Chris' words):

The encodingStyle they are using is archaic and Apache-specific (non-standard).  It also violates the current WS-I Basic Profile (http://ws-i.org/Profiles/Basic/2003-08/BasicProfile-1.0a.htm#refinement35501800).  There are a number of messages on SOAPBuilders and elsewhere about challenges with interoperability for servers using this sort of encoding (see below).  The problem here is the contradiction between the use="literal" attribute and the encodingStyle attribute.  In (modern) web services, use="literal" means XSD schema-based encoding, so it is therefore unecessary (and redundant) to specify an encodingStyle.  In this case it is even contradictory. http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/Mail/Message/Apache-Soap-Users/736360

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Wireless Blogging in SFO on the way to HKG on the way to KUL

August 21, '03 Comments [1] Posted in TechEd | Speaking | Gaming
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What was once science-fiction is now commonplace.  I'm blogging this entry from the lounge in the international terminal in SFO on the way to TechEd Malaysia.  There's T-Mobile hotspots everywhere for a very reasonable $6 a hour.  I'm even three floors down next to the gate with great coverage.  NetStumbler says there are six access points within a few hundred meters and 5 other laptop fools online with me.  I'm VPN'ed into work via IPsec, chatting with my boss over MSN Messenger, syncronizing Outlook 2003's offline Exchange store with the mothershop and I've got an online game of Rise of Nations running the background.  All on a laptop with a 1600x1200 (120dpi) screen that only weight about 6 pounds.

Madness my friends.  Madness if you don't realize how far we've come.  Of course, I needed a B.S. in Software Engineering to make it all happen (considering how hard it was just to get this F'ing Wireless card to work.   BUT, regardless.  Amazing. 

So, I took a picture of my wife and I with a Casio Exilim, docked it, hooked up the USB, it becomes the Z: drive (no driver installation!) and here's the result: 

A picture named CIMG0230 (Small).JPG

More to come, folks.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Roshambo and Rise of Nations

August 19, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Gaming | Africa
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If you've every played Age of Empires or the new Rise of Nations, you've probably realized by now that they are just really elaborate examples of Rock-Paper-Scissors (Pikeman beats Knight, Knight beats Footman, Footman beats Pikeman...). 

Even though I know this - as a 29 year old man I can intellectualize this - but I still stayed up until midnight last night playing International Roshambo (also known as Rise of Nations).  Dammit if it isn't a fantastic game.  I'm not even a big gamer, but the level of detail and thought put into this game is ridiculous. 

Of course, I play the Bantu (my wife is Zimbabwean Ndebele, a Bantu tribe) as they kick the most butt.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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New NetPing from Jeff Key

August 19, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Web Services | ASP.NET
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Jeff Key has updated NetPing.  NetPing is one of the primary examples I use when teaching newbies C#.  It's a nice utility that everyone can easily understand.  It's full of nice examples of Threading, WinForms, etc. 

It's also a cool addition to utils collections for the IT wonk.  He's updated it to include launching Remote Desktop, launch Computer Management and NetworkDriveInfo (another nice util).

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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PDC and Birds of a Feather - Host your own technical session!

August 18, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Speaking | PDC | XML
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This a very clever idea - an opportunity for a attendees of PDC to host a session on topics of their own choosing.

BoF sessions will be held on Sunday, October 26th from 6PM – 9PM and on Monday, October 27th and Tuesday, October 28th from 8PM – 11PM.  To propose a BoF session, please visit the registration form hosted by International .NET Association's (INETA) http://www.ineta.org/bof. At this site, you will be able to propose a topic as well as view and vote on topics proposed by other attendees.  Periodically, a committee consisting of INETA members and Microsoft employees will review the topics and select sessions for the conference.  Final BoF sessions will also be posted through CommNet so that when you are selecting you want to attend, you can also begin planning which BoFs you would like to attend.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.