Scott Hanselman

Holy Crap, 70-300

September 22, '03 Comments [1] Posted in Programming
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I woke up today and checked my Outlook Calendar first thing, like I do every morning, just to make sure I wasn't missing any 8 am meetings, and dammit if I didn't completely forget that like 6 months ago I scheduled a MCSD.NET test for Exam 70-300: Analyzing .NET Requirements.  Original MCSDs were given a free coupon for the new 70-300 but only if they took it by September 30th.  I got the coupon, cheapskate that I am, and immediately schedule the exam WAY out in September (today) figuring, "Hey, I've got months to worry about this."

This is the test with all the "new" kinds of questions.  It's got a chunk of multiple choice questions, but as soon as you get comfortable, you're faced with some weird E-R diagram with an interface that's straight out of Windows for Workgroups.  It's the Year-of-Our-Lord-Two-Thousand-and-Three and I'm taking this brand new test on 16-bit Windows.  I swear it was the same computer running the SAME software at the same testing center that certified me on WfW in 1993.

But, long story short, I passed it in about 40 minutes and made it back in time for lunch.  Now I can go back to my personal hypocrisy of bad-mouthing certifications.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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The replacement TechEd bag just arrived...

September 22, '03 Comments [0] Posted in TechEd | Speaking | PDC
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A very suspiciously-shaped package from a random distribution-warehouse-sounding address just arrived - what's inside?  Well, none other than a Replacement Backpack from TechEd U.S.  You might rememember that at TechEd by the end of the week many folk's bag's inner linings had ripped and at the end of the week there was an announcement that the bags would be replaced.  I still use my bag (I just hang on to a bag until the next conference, then I use that bag...wonder what we're getting at PDC?) and it's ripped all over.  At a recent garage sale I sold about a dozen bags for about $5 each, some going as far back as a SiteBuilders conference in the mid-90's...re-selling conference bags to the general public could become a lucrative side business for me.  I should probably read the bag's EULA, though. ;)

Anyway, I'm not sure what critical structural reinforcement or steel beams have been added to this new bag; it looks just about the same to me.  Either way, kudos for MSFT for making good on their promise.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Java is the SUV of Programming Languages or Phillip Greenspun is a stud

September 22, '03 Comments [2] Posted in ASP.NET | Tools
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This speaks to me, not only as a reformed Java person, but also as the owner of a Toyota Prius and a Honda Civic Hybrid...

"Our students this semester in 6.171, Software Engineering for Internet Applications have divided themselves into roughly three groups.  One third has chosen to use Microsoft .NET, building pages in C#/ASP.NET connecting to SQL Server.  One third has chosen to use scripting languages such as PHP connecting to PostgreSQL and sometimes Oracle.  The final third, which seems to be struggling the most, is using Java Server Pages (JSP) with Oracle on Linux.  JSP is fantastically simpler than "J2EE", which is the recommended-by-Sun way of building applications, but still it seems to be too complex for seniors and graduate students in the MIT computer science program, despite the fact that they all had at least one semester of Java experience in 6.170.

<snip/>But the programmers and managers using Java will feel good about themselves because they are using a tool that, in theory, has a lot of power for handling problems of tremendous complexity.  Just like the suburbanite who drives his SUV to the 7-11 on a paved road but feels good because in theory he could climb a 45-degree dirt slope." [Phillip Greenspun's Blog]

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Neal Stephenson in Portland doing a book signing for Quicksilver

September 22, '03 Comments [0] Posted in Musings
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For those of us who live in Portland, Neal Stephenson, author of Cryptonomicon, Diamond Age, and more importantly, Snow Crash, is doing a book signing (get that dog-eared copy of Snow Crash signed!)on a press junket around his new book Quicksilver on Wednesday, September 24th.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Internationalization/Globalization and ASP.NET Brainstorming at 1:05am

September 22, '03 Comments [0] Posted in ASP.NET | DasBlog | Internationalization | TechEd | Speaking | Tools
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I presented at ASPLive! and TechEd 2003 on Internationalizing ($g(i18n)) ASP.NET.  I know that the story changes with Whidbey and changes dramatically post-Whidbey, but until then...what are the best practices for ASP.NET 1.1?   DasBlog is a good example, as is (IMHO) the code I showed at the conferences.  Each takes certain approaches for performance vs. ease of i18n vs. avoiding $g(code smell).

Some random thoughts, some questions, some rethorical, some I could use comments/thoughts on:

  • Store a single ResourceMananger in the Application Object and either yank and cast as needed or stick it in some base blass.  [Seems reasonable.  Preferable over instantiating on each page?]
  • Create a base class (LocalizedPage, etc) that introduces an "OnLocalize" method and event, and performance most of your i18n there. [Good, but usually only an 80% solution.  Does let you bypass localization for the default language, though, and that's a BIG performance gain.]
  • For DataGrids, piggyback on DataBinding and do your i18n here [Not bad, easy, tends to spread i18n code out]
  • Localize in the .aspx page with <%#resMan.getString("someresourcename")> [Good, avoid cluttering code behind, also allows for quick changes without recompiles, although forces localization in the default language]

This and other questions burn...time to refactor...Now this looks like an interesting tool that makes ASP.NET localization more like WinForms localization.  I'll check out the trial, but I suspect it will break down when faced with complex ASP.NET DataGrids (definitely non-trivial to localize).

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.