Scott Hanselman

ASP.NET: How to create a Default "Enter" Button for Forms/PostBacks

August 25, '04 Comments [16] Posted in ASP.NET
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Here's a useful gem...basically 'preloading' the __EVENTTARGET in a hidden form field - from Developer.com:

Imagine you've created an ASP.NET Web page with a search button. The user taps a phrase into a text box and presses Enter. On most regular Web pages (think: Google), the form would be submitted and the results returned. In other words, the search button is automatically "clicked" for you.

However on an ASP.NET Web page, pressing Enter resubmits the form to the server, but actually does nothing... which is pretty useless, really.

So, how do you set a default button to be clicked when the user presses Enter? Simply add the following line to your page's Load event, replacing "btnSearch" with the name of your button. It uses a hidden Page method called RegisterHiddenField and works splendidly:

Page.RegisterHiddenField("__EVENTTARGET", "btnSearch")

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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[OT] Thanks Mr. Blizzard!

August 25, '04 Comments [6] Posted in ASP.NET | Speaking | Gaming
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Thanks Jim!  This is my "payment" for speaking at DevDays and doing well. This year my presentation was the highest rated of all DevDays in the US, last year Carl Franklin had that distinction. It was a very jazz-hands presentation and a lot of fun.  Jim is my DE in Portland, and Rory is the DCC

Now the real question is, what will Rory schmooz me with? XBox games? A new Keyboard? Come on, M$FT, let's have some coupons! ;)  Sigh, I'll probably get only a warm handshake (probably not even that) and a lump of coal.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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More on WebFarms and WebGardening in ASP.NET

August 25, '04 Comments [1] Posted in ASP.NET
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Had a short conversation over email and John Lam had this to offer around Web Gardens.  I checked with Corillian's scalability labs and heard that we have found similar results (we recently more than doubled our previous scalability numbers.)

Web gardens look interesting at first, but I spent a lot of time talking with folks at MS about web gardens and the consensus is that web gardens are only useful on very large SMP boxes – 16-way and up. The reason why is that IIS’s sweet spot is on 4-8 proc boxes. By using web gardens on large (>16 proc) SMP boxes and affinitizing CPU’s, you can make IIS think it’s running on a 4-8 proc box when in fact it’s running on a much larger box.

Fantastic information for anyone who's been disappointed with 16 proc IIS performance or for the two-proc folks who are thinking of adding horsepower.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to turn off/disable the .NET JIT Debugging Dialog

August 24, '04 Comments [1] Posted in Bugs | Tools
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A day may come when you want to turn off the Debug dialog that appears when a .NET program has an unhandled exception.

Option 1: Registry key from Enabling JIT Debugging

For an application that includes managed code, the common language runtime will present a similar dialog to JIT-attach a debugger. The registry key that controls this option is called HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\.NETFramework\DbgJITDebugLaunchSetting.

  • If value = 0, prompt the user by means of a message box. The choices are:
    • Continue. This results in a stack dump and process termination.
    • Attach a debugger. In this case, the runtime spawns the debugger listed in the DbgManagedDebugger registry key. If none, control is returned, and the process is terminated.
  • If value = 1, simply return control. This results in a stack dump, after which the process is terminated.  (No more dialog)
  • If value = 2, spawn the debugger listed in the DbgManagedDebugger registry key.

Option 2: If you want to disable the JIT debug dialog, but still want an error dialog:

Visual Studio.NET|Tools|Options|Debugging|Just-In-Time and deselect "Common Language Runtime" and now you’ll get an OK/Cancel dialog instead of the select a Debugger Dialog.  Note: The registry entry from Option 1 above will need to be 0 for the dialog to show up.

Thanks to Eric Deslauriers of Corillian QA for these tips!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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.NET Compact Framework Examples and Good Demos for Presentations

August 23, '04 Comments [0] Posted in Programming
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Here's a nice list of .NET CF (Compact Framework) projects you can play with.  The first three items (FotoVision, TaskVision and Signature) make good demos.  These are all courtesy of Vertigo Software.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.