Scott Hanselman

Microsoft AntiSpyware Beta detects ATL.DLL as spyware?

January 6, '05 Comments [2] Posted in Programming | Tools
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Looks like someone got their MD5's in a twist. Be careful with the new Beta. The screenshot below shows the new Microsoft Spyware Tool detecting Microsoft's own ATL.DLL from my SnapStream BeyondTV installation as being evil Spyware from another company. That's not good! I changed the recommended action to IGNORE for safety.

Spywareitsbeta

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Microsoft's AntiSpyware Beta - We shall see how it stacks up against SpyBot and AdAware...

January 6, '05 Comments [5] Posted in Musings | Tools
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SpynetWow, only 23 days since Microsoft acquired GIANT Company, they are releasing a BETA of Microsoft AntiSpyware.

It shore is purdy.

But I wonder why we need a separate program for:

  • Anti-Virus (coming soon)
  • SpyWare (in BETA)
  • Firewall (in SP2)
  • Popup Blocker (in SP2 and in MSN Desktop Search and in MSN's original  Toolbar. Why?)
  • Phishing Protection (nothing from Microsoft yet. There's yet-another-toolbar available from Netcraft to protect against phishing)

These are no doubt different teams at Microsoft. It'd be nice to have a single, unified "Keep Evil Away" program that did all of these. Spyware is a virus as far as I'm concerned. I wouldn't get spyware if I had ActiveX blocking, popup blocking or a good fireware. This is all getting a little confusing for my Mom, and I'd like a good way to explain to here why the Internet is out to get her.

Warning: be careful with the decisions you make with this particular tool, you may accidentally block your IT organization's SMS servers.

GiantfileYou know, you'd think the first thing one would do when acquiring a company would be to change the EXE name...

 

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Someone explain BlogShares to me...

January 6, '05 Comments [4] Posted in Musings
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BloglinesnewgraphApparently my blog is listed on BlogShares.com as the 9th most Overvalued Blog. However, it's my Radio Blog! That's right, the one I moved away from 18 months ago. The old link is "worth" almost 10 times the current, actual link.

What's that about? Someone explain to me what's the point of BlogShares, and why their PageRank is so violently ill.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Darned Usable - Yet Another Reason that Notepad2 is the editor of choice and the magic of CR/LF vs. LF

January 5, '05 Comments [5] Posted in Musings
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Notepad2cool

Those in the know already love Notepad2 and have much respect for Flo's flow. But, just when I thought I couldn't dig it more, today I had to edit some CVS files that were on SourceForge. They are Unix files (meaning Line Feeds terminating each line [LF] rather than CarriageReturn/LineFeed [CR/LF]) and the FAQ said in no uncertain terms - be careful when editing these files on Windows. 

That's advice that's always good to follow. Note only should you know your CR/LF status, but also whether you have Tabs vs. Spaces, and if you are ANSI or UTF-8 or Unicode.

Anyway, Notepad2 not only shows the the LF status in the status bar and optionally at the end of each line, BUT it also lets you CHANGE THE FILES STATUS by simply double clicking on the status bar indicator.

Fabulous. I was able to edit the Unix files without fear and with the confidence that the files I saved were correct. Slick.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Mapping/Connecting a Drive Letter to a WebDAV or Front Page website

January 5, '05 Comments [4] Posted in Programming | Tools
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On the OT list recently the question was asked: "Does anyone know of an FPSE (Front Page Server Extensions/WebDAV) client that works on the command-line?"

The fellow basically wanted to XCOPY/COPY files from his machine to a remote site from the command line. I recommended the ridiculously powerful SynchronEX. I use it to automate the backup of my site from FTP (XFTP actually, maintaining file dates!) nightly, which is then backed up by my Iomega Rev Drive's Automatic Backup Pro Software. It's more than just a command-line tool, it's a complete scriptable beast with two-way sync and multiple remote file system support.

Later, John Schroedl responded with this built-in-to-Windows-XP tasty tip:

net use * http://www.webdav.org/ passwrd /user:username

He notes a caveat "Windows XP assumes that any WebDAV repository begins at the root of the server path. If a user mounts http://www.example.com/hr/ergonomics, then the OPTIONS request to http://www.example.com/ must show WebDAV support or the Redirector will fail."

For example:

C:\>net use * http://foo/Bar/SomeDirectory XXXXXXX /user:scott
Drive Z: is now connected to
http://foo/Bar/SomeDirectory.

The command completed successfully.

C:\>dir z:
Volume in drive Z has no label.
Volume Serial Number is 0000-0000

Directory of Z:\

12/22/2004  05:01 PM    <DIR>          .
12/22/2004  05:01 PM    <DIR>          ..
12/09/2004  03:37 PM             2,335 File.egp
12/22/2004  05:01 PM    <DIR>          TestDir
               1 File(s)          2,335 bytes
               3 Dir(s)   2,620,660,736 bytes free

From here you can use the command shell commands (XCOPY/COPY) to work with DAV as any other drive. A great tip!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.