Scott Hanselman

Scott Hanselman, 11 Successful Large Projects, 3 Open Source Applications, 1 Collossal Failure

April 21, '06 Comments [48] Posted in Musings
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I noticed a resume come by recently from a person that included their name and email signature like this:

Joe Blow, MCSE, MCSE+I, MCSD, MCT, MCP

For me, this is a little off-putting. Kudos to folks who get certified. Certifications are great for the certifications section on your resume. They shouldn't go in the education section and shouldn't go after your name. I blogged about this three years ago, but I've got my mind around it now.

Folks go to school for 20+ years to put "PhD" after their name. I could go take a cert test now, but should it be displayed so prominently?

I used to chase MS Certs, got a bunch then realized that no one really cares.

What potential employers WANT to see is, do you go from 3 month project to 3 month project? Or are you the kind of person who stays at a job for a few years until you ship v1.0 or v1.5?

People want to know how many successful projects you've been on, not how many tests you can take.

I scored high enough on my high school SATs (like the O-levels for you non-US folks) but do I tell folks? Should I sign emails:

Scott Hanselman, 400 Math, 560 English (not my real score)? ;)

Scott Hanselman, 6 O's, 3 A's (for the UK folks)

What about:

Scott Hanselman, 143 IQ (not my real score)? ;)

Wouldn't these indicate to a prospective employer that I'm a decent writer and all-around thinker? Why is it socially inappropriate to publicly tout scores like these, but

If it's silly to suggest putting my SATs on my resume, why is

Scott Hanselman, MCSD, MCT, MCP, MC*.*

reasonable? Just my thinking...when I hire, having a cert means you have a capacity to hold lots of technical stuff in your head. Full stop.

I propose we sign our names like this:

Scott Hanselman, 11 Successful Large Projects, 3 Open Source Applications (it's not a crap idea), 1 Colossal Failure

Wouldn't that be nice? Sign your name, people.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes Podcast 14

April 19, '06 Comments [8] Posted in ASP.NET | Podcast | XML | Tools
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HanselminutesMy fourteenth Podcast is up. This episode is about code generation and some popular .NET codegen tools.

We're listed in the iTunes Podcast Directory, so I encourage you to subscribe with a single click (two in Firefox) with the button below. For those of you on slower connections there are lo-fi and torrent-based versions as well.

Subscribe to my Podcast in iTunes

Our sponsors are CodeSmith, PeterBlum and the .NET Dev Journal.

CodeSmith-SmallNOTE: Spread the word on this coupon discount, folks: If you use Coupon Code HM100 you can get $100 off CodeSmith Professional. We use CodeSmith here at Corillian and I'm a huge fan. It's intuitive use of ASP.NET-like syntax and powerful advanced XML techniques add up to immediate value to the dev. We've used it to code gen domain objects from XML, write sprocs and generate Data Access Layers. I recommend you give it a hard look. We'll be doing a Code Gen show next week. Feel free to spread the coupon code around, it's HM100.

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

  • Each show will include a number of links, and all those links will be posted along with the show on the site. There were a number of sites mentioned in this episode, some planned, some not.
  • The basic MP3 feed is here, and the iPod friendly one is here. There's a number of other ways you can get it (streaming, straight download, etc) that are all up on the site just below the fold. I use iTunes, myself, to listen to most podcasts, but I also use FeedDemon and it's built in support.
  • Note that for now, because of bandwidth constraints, the feeds always have just the current show. If you want to get an old show (and because many Podcasting Clients aren't smart enough to not download the file more than once) you can always find them at http://www.hanselminutes.com.
  • I have, and will, also include the enclosures to this feed you're reading, so if you're already subscribed to ComputerZen and you're not interested in cluttering your life with another feed, you have the choice to get the 'cast as well.
  • If there's a topic you'd like to hear, perhaps one that is better spoken than presented on a blog, or a great tool you can't live without, contact me and I'll get it in the queue!

Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

Now playing: Newsboys - He Reigns

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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New integrated real-time glucose meter and pump coming THIS SUMMER

April 19, '06 Comments [7] Posted in Diabetes
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Minimed_combo_system_1This is potentially HUGE. If you're not diabetic (likely you're not) then at least revel in the geek of it. Amy beat me to it on her blog, DiabetesMine, but maybe I'll be able to add a little detail.

Today I received this email from my local Insulin Pump rep:

On April 12th, 2006 our new Paradigm REAL-Time System was approved by the FDA.  This is the first-ever insulin pump with REAL-time glucose sensing capability, and is a huge step towards our goal of creating the artificial pancreas. 

If you are not currently on an insulin pump and would like to know more about this, please feel free to contact me at the information listed below.  If you are already on a MiniMed pump, I encourage you to visit our website, www.minimed.com , or call 1-800-MINIMED to find out how you can upgrade to this new insulin pump system. 

Medtronic Diabetes (MiniMed) is very excited to offer you this breakthrough technology!  Please feel free to contact me locally if you have any questions.  To see a demonstration of this new system, please attend one of our many “Pump events”.  You can see a list of events and sign up for one at www.minimed.com/events

This is huge. If a number of things come together, I should be hooked up to this system in mid-June. Here's the back story.

Shots ten years ago: For years I took shots, as did and as do many Type 1 diabetics, to keep my blood sugar down. (More detail in my Diabetes: Airplane Analogy) You eat, food turns into glucose and your blood sugar goes up as your body is missing insulin, the hormone needed to deliver the sugar to your cells. Typically this is done with two kinds of Insulin, one that's short acting (starts working in an hour and lasts about 6 hours) that you inject at every meal, and one long acting that is running "in the background" that you inject 2-4 times a day.

Shots today: Today, there are newer insulins, a short acting one that starts working in minutes and lasts a few hours, and a long acting one that lasts for 24 hours that you only have to inject once. This means, wake up, take a shot for the background insulin, then take a shot for each meal. This is a great therapy if you stick to it. It's often called the "poor man's pump."

Pumps a few years ago: My insulin pump is a delivery device, that's it. It is a tube about 3 feet long that is stuck into me with a 9mm needle/canula. I'm connected to it 24 hours a day, except for a few minutes in the shower. I prick my fingers 8-10 times a day to draw blood and check my sugar levels. A few years back I'd do some calculations in my head and decide how much insulin the pump should give me. The pump was ignorant and just followed orders.

Pumps this year: Newer pumps, like the one I have now can communicate wirelessly (one way, receiving information only) with my blood sugar meter. I prick my finger and the meter "announces" the blood sugar value and the pump records it. Since the pump knows how much insulin it's been delivering, it can do the math for me and make suggestions as to how much insulin I should take. It doesn't do anything automatically, but it does suggest and I "close the loop." The "closed loop" system is the Holy Grail of Diabetes Management - a system that checks sugar automatically, delivers insulin automatically and keeps me alive automatically (presumably without mistakes.

Pump pictures 005Pumps starting in June (yay!): The new Paradigm 522 communicates wirelessly with another device that'll be attached nearby (see the picture at the upper right). The sensor tests every ten seconds and averages to give you a new value every five minutes. It'll give you an alarm if your numbers go out of your specified range. The pump still needs you (me) to "close the loop" and press OK when it makes a suggestion. However, this is very promising because the next obvious step is implanting the whole apparatus, pump and meter, in your torso and managing it with a watch-like remote - an artificial pancreas. The big negative is that you have to change the sensor every three days and they are $30 a pop. That'd mean $300 a month if you wanted to have it working all the time. You don't HAVE to have the continuous equipment hooked up all the time, you could use it just when travelling or when things are going smoothly. Hopefully the price for the equipment will drop soon or be covered by US insurance.

An acquaintance of mine, and fellow diabetic, Chris Jarvis is a member of the 2004 Canadian Olympic Rowing team and all-around bad-ass. He's been using a new Paradigm 522 Insulin Pump and Continuous Glucose Meter for a while now. (Canada got this pump before the US.) He and his team of 7 others diabetics ran the Boston Marathon recently all wearing continuous meters and have compiled a lot of data on how the diabetic body works while doing things like running marathons. He's been so kind as to allow me to upload some PDFs that the pump/meter/software combination creates. The statistical data here is fantastic. The difference between 1400 readings and 10 is significant. ;) Thank you Chris for sharing something so personal as your health information.

File Attachment: 7 day trend analysis.pdf (36 KB)
File Attachment: 14 day trend.pdf (31 KB)
File Attachment: Daily Summary.pdf (31 KB)

Do check out his site at http://www.insulindependence.org.

Also, we're still raising money for Team Hanselman and the Walk for Diabetes on May 6th. We raised over $11,000 pushing right through our goal of $10k. Let's raise that goal to $15 and see if we can't make it happen before May 6th! Thanks to everyone for their fantastic support. Forward the link to your friends and family!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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New USB Wireless Security Lock software doesn't work with new hardware

April 19, '06 Comments [8] Posted in Coding4Fun
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WirelesspclockThe USB Wireless Security Lock/KeyFob is a very slick piece of hardware with crap software. Bryan's USBWiSec Software made it usable and added plugin capabilities.

Recently a number of users have reported that their USB Key isn't working with our software. Seems that a new vendor has stepped in with the same hardware and a different product/vendor id.

It used to be Vid_04b4&Pid_7417, but now Vid_13b7&Pid_7417 has appeared. We'll get this updated and built soon, and probably include a configuration option, but until then, you can update UsbStickReceiver.cs line 141 to the new ID.

Perhaps this is the push the project needs for the next major release. BTW, there's a nice video with a live demo midway through on Channel 9.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hacking Video Game Consoles

April 18, '06 Comments [0] Posted in Reviews | Gaming
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I picked up a copy of Hacking Video Game Consoles last week. What a fantastic book. It's ridiculously cheap on Amazon, only $18.89 right now.

PS1_CNC_medThe author, Ben Heckendorn has long been a legend in these circles, and has a vibrant community orbiting around his hacks.

The book is VERY well written with a snarky but not condescending conversational style that is  easy to read. He includes RadioShack Part Numbers for every part as well as an excellent primer on soldering.

This would make a great gift for any 20-something geek and an excellent father-son project for teens and tweens.

He's recently added a section on his site to buy the pre-cut machined plastic cases for your creations for very reasonable prices, IMHO. I'm totally stoked and am going to try to build one of these with the wife in the coming months. I think I'll make the PS1 portable first.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.