Scott Hanselman

Developer Stand up Comedy - Coding 4 Fun

May 5, '11 Comments [27] Posted in ASP.NET | Coding4Fun | Musings | Speaking
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imageThere aren't enough funny developer talks in my opinion. Lots of you folks are so funny in person and when I got to conferences or just have lunch we laugh and laugh. As with all niches or cliques, we're all part of a little club of inside jokes and shared stories.

It's always weird to get lots of comments on my technical talks. Many are positive, but sometimes I'll get one like "your not funy!" or "stop joking and start coding." Well, I realize my brand of edutainment isn't for everyone.

That said, this talk is happily content-free. If you hate my jokes, you may ignore it. ;)

Many years ago I did some local open mics and stand up, although I've never really put together a tight hour of material. I'm less of a stand up and more of a storyteller. Anyway, I got signed up for a talk in Holland last week called "Coding 4 Fun" but didn't prepare anything. I was already signed up for 6 other talks and had already presented 3 times by the time I showed up on stage at the 7pm "geek night" session.

There were a bunch of people there almost an hour early so I just sat on the end of the stage and we chatted. It was great fun. Next thing we knew, the guy was recording the video and the room was filling up.

So, I talked and told stories and chatted my co-workers and friends on IM for a while, the showed some community built NuGet packages. The only think I wish is that you could see the audience in this video. They were fun and engaged and silly.

Big thanks to Glenn Block and Clemens Vasters for sitting in the front row and playing along, and to Damian Edwards, Tim Heuer and Phil Haack for being silly over IM.

A lot of the jokes are in the IM or the code, so if you can't see them (even though I zoom in) with smooth streaming, download a higher res version so you can see them.

Coding for Fun with Scott Hanselman recorded in Holland in April of 2011

I hope you enjoy. Maybe one day I will put together a real act of "stand up for developers."

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Should I use HTML5 or Silverlight? One man's opinion.

May 4, '11 Comments [75] Posted in ASP.NET | Musings | Silverlight
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I was in Belgium and The Netherlands this last week presenting and talking to folks in the community. After I presented on ASP.NET MVC 3, HTML5 and jQuery, one fellow came up after and said, "Should I use Silverlight or HTML5. I don't understand what Microsoft's strategy is or what to use in my app."

Since I work for the Web Platform and Tools team (ASP.NET, IIS, etc) I spend a lot of time working, coding, and thinking about the web. However, I'm not an official strategist, or marketing guy.  But I do have an opinion; one that is mine and no one else's.

That said, I don't think it's that hard and I'm surprised there's so much confusion about this (both outside and inside Microsoft.)  Companies have their official positions but then there's the realities of the web. Here's what the young man asked me and what I told him.

NOTE: I'm talking only about Silverlight in web browsers, not Silverlight for Phone, Games, Out of Browser, High Trust, and other environments that are uniquely Silverlighty.

Should I use HTML5 or Silverlight in my Applications? If you're embracing jQuery, where does Silverlight fit in?

Even though browsers like Chrome release and update very often, not every company is going to upgrade all their browsers every week or even twice a year. Some enterprises will be on Firefox 3.6 for a while longer, or (hopefully not) IE6. Browser plugins like Silverlight and Flash can add new functionality faster. They are called plugins for a reason. They plug-in and add something.

HTML5 isn't 100% done, but today it's already a collection of things that can be used now. Your web apps should use techniques like progressive enhancement to detect available features. As newer browsers include useful features like geolocation and video that used to require plugins, then older plugins become unnecessary. Plugins rev and add new more advanced features like DVR-like video and hardware-accelerated 3D. Those features will eventually find their way into browsers in a few years and the cycle will continue.

Silverlight 5 will become Silverlight 6, Flash 10 will become Flash 11 and HTML5 will become HTML6. Each new spec will add new features, innovating, and pushing the others forward . The web will be pushed forward by all these and more.

There's no question that advanced media apps, 3d, DVR video scenarios shine on Silverlight. Silverlight CAN do some things that HTML5 can't.

If you are creating an application for the web that needs images, links and text boxes, some animations and interactivity, there's no reason you shouldn't use HTML. With new JavaScript libraries like Modernizr, jQuery along with Polyfills, you can even use many HTML5 features and still have good functionality on ALL major browsers - not just the most recent generation.

If your application is internal or a line of business app and is what I call a basic "text boxes over data" application, you have a few choices. You can certainly use Silverlight and its databinding features, or you can use JavaScript libraries like KnockoutJS and write it in HTML. It depends on where you and your company's core skillset lies. Both are good choices and both aren't going anywhere.

If Silverlight has a feature that you need that isn't a part of mainstream browsers, consider a web app that is both HTML/JavaScript and Silverlight. I'm consistently surprised that people feel the need to make Silverlight apps that fill the entire browser but consist of mostly text, images, links, etc. Don't try to make Silverlight act like it's HTML. It's not. Plugins are complimentary to the web, they are not the web. Use them in complementary ways to make the best experiences you can.

If you need basic video like YouTube, use <video> tags if your browser supports the codecs you need, and a plugin if not. However, if you need live video, adaptive smooth streaming, DVR functionality, H.264, or other features that aren't part of HTML5, then again, use a plugin.

Also consider your own productivity and happiness and the tools you want to use. Think about your users, your dev team and their overall happiness.

Apps in C and C++ have their place in games and uniquely native scenarios. Apps using managed languages and XAML balance easy development and deployment flexibility. Apps in HTML and JavaScript work everywhere on the web. Perhaps one day we'll be able to easily mix and match these styles in the best of all worlds.

Until then, it's simple. Use HTML when it makes sense to your solution. Use a plugin when it provides unique functionality. Rinse, repeat. Apply common sense, and a little hair gel.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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TechDays/DevDays Netherlands and Belgium:

May 2, '11 Comments [11] Posted in ASP.NET | ASP.NET MVC | NuGet | Open Source | Speaking
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Last week I was in Belgium and The Netherlands speaking at TechDays. A number of those videos are online at Channel 9. It was a great time. Here's the talks I gave. Sorry there's three screenshots of my big head to follow.

DevDays Keynote

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The first 10 minutes or so of this are in Dutch, but you can fast forward to my part if you like. I'm about 20 min right after Arie stops talking. I talk about what Microsoft has built this year, what we are doing around Open Source, and how I see things snapping (and how they snapped) together from VB3 until today.

NuGet In Depth: Empowering Open Source on the .NET Platform

image

In this talk I start from the absolute basics of NuGet, how to make and publish a package and I work up to my thoughts on NuGet in the Enterprise and NuGet with Commercial Software. Then I show extreme examples of NuGet packages.

MVC 3 – 101: Beginner to Advanced

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This is a 101 level talk. I start from the most basic ASP.NET MVC site, and move quickly through the basics, through the new Scaffolding changes, MvcScaffolding and finally OutputFilters.

In the evening I hosted a silly "Coding 4 Fun" session where I talked about my remote camera setup, chatted and teased Phil Haack, Tim Heuer and Damian Edwards, and told stories about working at Microsoft. It was definitely irreverent to say the least. I think it was taped and I'll post it as soon as I see it's up.

Hope you enjoy them! Remember, if the smooth streaming doesn't work, you can always download the offline versions.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes Podcast 264 - This is not your father's WCF - All about the WebAPI with Glenn Block

April 29, '11 Comments [0] Posted in Open Source | Podcast | Web Services
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imageGlenn Block is with Scott in The Netherlands and tries to get Scott up to speed on what's new in the WCF Web Api. Scott thinks WCF is scary and heavyweight. How does WCF fit into a world of Web 2.0 lightweight APIs? What's the WCF WebAPI and how does compare to services in ASP.NET MVC?

Download: MP3 Full Show

Links from the Show

NOTE: If you want to download our complete archives as a feed - that's all 264 shows, subscribe to the Complete MP3 Feed here.

Also, please do take a moment and review the show on iTunes.

Subscribe: Subscribe to Hanselminutes or Subscribe to my Podcast in iTunes or Zune

Do also remember the complete archives are always up and they have PDF Transcripts, a little known feature that show up a few weeks after each show.

Telerik is our sponsor for this show.

Building quality software is never easy. It requires skills and imagination. We cannot promise to improve your skills, but when it comes to User Interface and developer tools, we can provide the building blocks to take your application a step closer to your imagination. Explore the leading UI suites for ASP.NETAJAX,MVC,Silverlight, Windows Forms and WPF. Enjoy developer tools like .NET Reporting,ORM,Automated Testing Tools, Agile Project Management Tools, and Content Management Solution. And now you can increase your productivity with JustCode, Telerik’s new productivity tool for code analysis and refactoring. Visitwww.telerik.com.

As I've said before this show comes to you with the audio expertise and stewardship of Carl Franklin. The name comes from Travis Illig, but the goal of the show is simple. Avoid wasting the listener's time. (and make the commute less boring)

Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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This Developer's Life 2.0.1 - Criticism

April 24, '11 Comments [7] Posted in Podcast
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deafIn this first episode of the second season of This Developer's Life we talk to three developers about criticism - some they've given and some they've received. In addition we talk to a very vocal critic of this podcast.

  • Ayende Rahien - a prominent developer in the .NET community and a force of nature
  • G. Andrew Duthie - a Developer Evangelist at Microsoft
  • Boris Pavlović , a Serbian developer living with his wife and family in Switzerland

    Also, please visit the new site at http://thisdeveloperslife.com. We've got sixteen episodes so far, and we are pretty proud of them. Don't listen to podcasts? Don't commute? Surely you have a long plane flight coming up? Maybe a cross country drive? Load up. It's all free.

    You can download the MP3 here (53 minutes) and visit our site at http://thisdeveloperslife.com.

    Please consider subscribing with iTunes, or Zune. If you enjoy it, take a moment and please do REVIEW our show on iTunes.

    Or if you have a BitTorrent client and would like to help save us bandwidth money, as well as the bragging rights of downloading legal torrents via RSS, get our Torrent Feed at ClearBits.

    The bandwidth and other costs for this week's show were picked up DevExpress and CodeRush! Visit them and thank them on Twitter.

    DX_Slogan_350

    Announcing our listener contest...This Developer's Life - Crowdsourced

    Oh yes. We want to hear your stories. Record your best developer stories and send them to us and if we think they rock, we'll include them in the next episode of This Developer's Life.

    What we need from you:

    • Your story. We don't want interviews, we want stories. Tell us about your passion, or something crazy that happened at work while solving some technical problem.
    • Keep your audio clean. Use a decent microphone or at least make sure you don't "overdrive" your microphone by talking to close or two loudly. Don't record while mowing the lawn and don't record in a giant echo chamber.
    • Be passionate. Talk to us like you're talking to a friend.
    • Don't worry about editing or music. Just share. We'll handle the Lady Gaga mashups.
    • Note we may move your audio around or change the order of stuff to make it more listenable or interesting or both.
    • Change the names of companies and people to protect the innocent (or guilty)
    • Know that by giving us your audio you're releasing it the Creative Commons and that we may or may not use it for a future show.

    Send us a link to your audio file and what you're talking about and we'll do the rest. See you next time!

    About Scott

    Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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    Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.