Scott Hanselman

Add Social Sharing Links to your Blog without widget JavaScript

August 5, '13 Comments [13] Posted in Blogging
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This sharing button thing is out of controlI'm always trying to tidy up my blog layout and remove 'noise' but every time I try to remove those social sharing buttons for Twitter and Facebook I get a barrage of email asking me to put them back. Personally, I use bookmarklets in my browser for tweeting links, rather than relying on AddThis or ShareThis or any of the other garish sharing JavaScripts.

This sharing button thing is out of control. Links work too, folks. It's the web. Let's not have our blogs turn into Vegas Billboards.*

Twitter, Facebook and Google+ all offer JavaScript that they'd LOVE for you to add to your site. Tracking is one of the reasons that they'd love you to add these. That may or may not be a strong reason not to add their JavaScript, but a concrete reason not to is speed.

When you add three services' JavaScript you're adding three DNS lookups, three (or 20) HTTP requests for their JavaScript and images, and on and on. That JavaScript has to execute as well, of course, but the value it provides isn't justified over the speed and hassle involved in my opinion.

I wanted to add social sharing links without adding JavaScript. Fortunately all these services support sharing via simply visiting a URL. Stated differently, you can share via an HTTP GET.

Below, I'm adding "YOURURLHERE" in the places you'll want the URL for your blog post. You should change these templates for your own blog engineer. WordPress, BlogSpot, DasBlog, etc all have different macro formats. Your mileage may vary.

NOTE: Make sure you check that you have the right number of quotes and ampersands when adding these to your blog template.

Twitter

Note that twitter's sharing format includes the URL, the Title and the "via" which is your twitter name.

<a href="https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?url=YOURURLHERE&text=YOURPOSTTITLEHERE&via=YOURTWITTERNAMEHERE">Twitter</a>

Facebook

<a href="https://facebook.com/sharer.php?u=YOURURLHERE">Facebook</a>

Google+

<a href="https://plus.google.com/share?url=YOURURLHERE">Google+</a>

You can share THIS post by clicking the links just below here on the same line as the Comments link.

Let me know about other social sites that support this kind of sharing in the comments, and I'll add your tips to this post.

* Yes, I know I have ads on this blog. It's taco money and it pays for the gadgets I review. It's hardly Vegas.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselman's Newsletter of Wonderful Things: July 2nd, 2013

August 5, '13 Comments [3] Posted in Newsletter
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I have a "whenever I get around to doing it" Newsletter of Wonderful Things. Why a newsletter? I dunno. It seems more personal somehow. Fight me.

You can view all the previous newsletters here. You can sign up here to the Newsletter of Wonderful Thingsor just wait and get them some weeks later on the blog, which hopefully you have subscribed to. Email folks get it first!

Here's the newsletter that I sent out July 2nd.


Hi Interfriends,

Thanks again for signing up for this experiment. Here's some interesting things I've come upon this week. If you forwarded this (or if it was forwarded to you) a reminder: You can sign up at http://hanselman.com/newsletter and the archive of all previous Newsletters is here.

Remember, you get the newsletter here first. This one will be posted to the blog as an archive in a few weeks. 

Scott Hanselman

(BTW, since you *love* email you can subscribe to my blog via email here: http://feeds.hanselman.com/ScottHanselman DO IT!)

P.P.S. You know you can forward this to your friends, right?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Download Windows Live Writer 2012

August 5, '13 Comments [73] Posted in Tools
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imageWhy is this blog post called "Download Windows Live Writer 2012?" Because that's all I wanted to do. I love Live Writer. If you love it too, put a note in the comments and maybe the team will notice, because I will carry Windows Live Writer with me until you pry it from my cold, dead hands. I use Windows Live Writer exclusively for writing my blog posts and I recommend you use it too. Windows Live Writer is the best windows blog authoring application I have found so far.

This post now exists so when I google for download Windows Live Writer I will find it.

The TL;DR version of this post is this:

I googled with Google for "Windows Live Writer 2012" and got this mess, including the slightly creepy "you visited this page on" message. Um, thanks for noticing.

* These images are poorly resized on purpose you don't think they are clickable.

image

When I googled with Bing for "Windows Live Writer 2012" I got this mess. Three results from a bunch of evil download sites that I don't trust because they will just install toolbars and I'm generally afraid of them.

image

The second link looks promising since it's at Microsoft's own Download Center, BUT the date is from 2009.

Finding this thing is too hard so this blog post exists so you can find it and because I felt like complaining a little. Just a little.

Again, the point of this post is this:

Have a nice day!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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A rich new JavaScript code editor spreading to several Microsoft web sites

August 1, '13 Comments [33] Posted in Javascript
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Where is this JavaScript-based editable code area coming from?

I noticed yesterday that some C#, JavaScript and CSS files I had sitting in SkyDrive were suddenly editable.

Editable code in SkyDrive

Not just editable, but there's also autocompletion of strings (not quite intellisense, as it's just one file at a time) and token/symbol recognition.

Editable code in SkyDrive

Plus, this editor looked REALLY familiar to me. I started looking.

I looked over at the Windows Azure Portal, where developers can write node.js to make web services directly in the browser. Here we've got dropbox autocomplete, tooltips with syntax errors and even some basic symbolic refactoring!

Azure Mobile Service's rich code editor

Below you can see the editor in Azure Mobile Services throwing a tooltip syntax error. Is this happening on the server?

Untitled2

Then I remember TypeScript's "playground" online that shows how TypeScript turns into JavaScript. This is split-screen with TypeScript on the left and JavaScript on the right.

The TypeScript Playground

Then I went to look at TFS Online's stuff at http://tfs.visualstudio.com/ where I made an account http://hanselman.visualstudio.com to host private Git repos for side projects.

Inline comments in TFS online

Notice that in TFS Online this editor is used for diffs and comparisons, but also includes inline threaded comments! This is all in JavaScript, people.

The editor in a side by side diff

I brought up F12 tools just to check.

The javaScript editor open in SkyDrive

That's pretty unambiguous. Looking at the CSS by just clicking on editor.main.css. The "vs" in the div's class point to a vs-theme.css that I presume is to set the colors and make the text editor look familiar.

editor.main.css

Looking in editor.main.js, it's all minified, but it's cool to see.

editor.main.js

This JavaScript code editor/viewer component is on a TFS site, an Azure site and a SkyDrive site, being used very different divisions across Microsoft. Very cool to see code reuse, but also a good experience replicated. Kudos to the SkyDrive team for recognizing a good thing and putting it into production. It'll be interesting to see where else this editor pops up in the future.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Do you have a digital or social media will? Who will maintain your life online when you're dead?

August 1, '13 Comments [22] Posted in Musings
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Will used via CC - Flickr user Ken Mayer http://www.flickr.com/photos/ken_mayer/5599532152/in/photolist-9wP4PN-9wP4Sf-8KxmQx-f7FzSF/

As we continue to pour our few remaining keystrokes into walled gardens we should be asking ourselves - who controls our content? You don't want all your words to be wasted so I hope you own your own domains and have backup copies of all these years of content.

If you die, will everything you've written become a 404? Some people choice to quit the internet, commit infosuicide and make everything return "410 Gone" but most us want our content to live on.

If you die, who will maintain your sites?

If you have kids, you likely have designated a godfather or godmother to raise your kids if you're gone. You should also designate a blogmother and blogfather.

If you  have a Google Account (although, oddly and sadly, not a Google Apps account) you can set up the Google Inactive Account Manager to decide what you want done with your account when it's 'inactive' (you're dead). You can have your data sent to a relative, or have the account deleted. It's a great idea.

You can also sign up for a service like Legacy Locker which promises to manage all your digital stuff and handled the hard questions like "is he or she really dead?" and "are you the digital beneficiary?" At $30 a year or $300 one time it seems a little spendy, but it exists and there's clearly a market for the idea.

Here's what you can do for free.

  • You should already have your content and life backed up in three places, one of which being the cloud.
  • You should have a "Getaway Thumb Drive." This is your "the house is burning, RUN" drive.
    • Consider using TrueCrypt or BitLocker To Go to encrypt one and give a copy to two friends or family members (or lawyer). Make a "readme.txt" or a "soiamdead.txt" explaining what you want done with your sites, passwords, etc."
  • Add your social media sites, blogs, code, repositories and anything else as an asset in your will that is handled by an executor like any other asset.

Even the US Government thinks we need a Social Media Will and I agree. Except for the part where you give your friend an Excel sheet with all your passwords in plaintext. Oh, US Government, you!

They suggest:

  • Review the privacy policies and the terms and conditions of each website where you have a presence.
  • State how you would like your profiles to be handled. You may want to completely cancel your profile or keep it up for friends and family to visit. Some sites allow users to create a memorial profile where other users can still see your profile but can’t post anything new.
  • Give the social media executor a document that lists all the websites where you have a profile, along with your usernames and passwords.
  • Stipulate in your will that the online executor should have a copy of your death certificate. The online executor may need this as proof in order for websites to take any actions on your behalf.
  • Check to see if the social media platforms have account management features to let you proactively manage what happens to your accounts after you die.

You should have a plan for your blog, your domains, and anything that has a login. I use a Password Manager and my family has access to that as well.

This may seem morbid or overwhelming, but this is a project that should take you only a few hours. Imagine your family, spouse or partner in the wake of your death and how it will feel for them, wondering how to manage all this digital flotsam you've left. They'll have no idea where to start. It could take them months, or never, to figure it all out. Just take a few hours and write it down.

* Photo via Ken Mayer on Flickr, used under CC

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.