Scott Hanselman

How to enter and use Emoji on Windows 8.1

July 9, '14 Comments [16] Posted in Win8
Sponsored By

I have an iPhone 5s and every once in a while my wife and would be texting and I would send her a and she would be like "why you sending me a square?" Then later she got a Nokia 1020 and then we could send each other Emoji's back and forth 😄 😃 😀 😊 ☺ 😉 😍.

Today you can use Emoji pretty much anywhere, be it mobile or on the web with most modern browsers. Windows 8 has an on-screen keyboard that you can use to type Emoji, even if you use a regular keyboard and mouse.

Perhaps you think Emoji are silly? Did you know that Twitter actually makes sure Emoji work in all browsers by swapping them out for their own Twitter-custom images? The people LOVE them some Emoji.

Right click in the Taskbar and make sure you have the Touch Keyboard checked:

Windows 8.1 Emoji Touch Keyboard

You can see it there in the Taskbar. Click it.

Windows 8.1 Emoji Touch Keyboard

Now, click the Smiley.

Windows 8.1 Emoji Touch Keyboard

It's important to note the Arrows on the left there, as well as the categories on the bottom. ALL the Emoji are there.

Windows 8.1 Emoji Touch Keyboard

Even U+1F4A9 PILE OF POO. So that's 💩

Also noticed that Emoji are in COLOR in Internet Explorer. Here is the GetEmoji site with Chrome on the left and IE11 on the right. I've zoomed in on IE to show that the font scales.

Look at all the Emoji

There's an amazing article by Ralf Herrmann on Color Emoji in Windows 8.1—The Future of Color Fonts? that I recommend you read immediately. I've taken part of his image below to show one of the main points of his articles. The Emoji in Windows 8.1 are inside of the Segoe UI Emoji font, and are NOT PNGs (as on other systems) which allows them to scale. Instead, they are layered and each layer has a color. So cool.

winemoji

I'm going to hack around and see if I can change the color of each individual layers. "Diversified Emoji" is a big topic right now, as not everyone wants a yellow LEGO head. There's lots of quasi-Emoji chat apps on all phones with afrocentric or other kinds of emojis. I wonder if a layering system like this would be way to create infinitely diverse emoji?

NOTE: I have NO idea what I'm talking about here, just thinking out loud.

It doesn't seem like Window's built in CharMap.exe supports newer Unicode 7 (?) but BabelMap is a fantastic Extended Character Map that will let you explore all of your choices in a font like Segoe UI Emoji.

BabelMap

Now I need to think about how unprofessional it will be to include Emoji in all my work email. And, more importantly, if it'll all just turn into a "J" in Outlook. ;)


Sponsor: Thanks to friends at RayGun.io. I use their product and LOVE IT. Get notified of your software’s bugs as they happen! Raygun.io has error tracking solutions for every major programming language and platform - Start a free trial in under a minute!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by ORCS Web

Video Tutorial and Screenshots: Windows 8.1 Update 1

April 3, '14 Comments [52] Posted in Screencasts | Win8
Sponsored By

I have a personal MSDN account so I download and installed the Windows 8.1 Update as soon as I could. It'll roll out to the rest of the world slowly in the coming weeks.

The verdict? It's a significant improvement. I use an X1 Carbon Touch laptop, and while it has a touchscreen, I spend most of my time on the mouse and keyboard. I'm comfortable with moving between Store (fullscreen) apps and Desktop apps but it's always a little jarring. You're leaping between two universes. I want to live in one universe and this Windows update merges them in a measured way that means I'm moving faster when using my computer.

I've just put up a brand new 5 minute YouTube video to give you a tour of just a few of the new features.

After you get the update, you'll notice immediately that the Windows Store - a full screen app, mind you - is pinned to your Windows Desktop's Taskbar. You can now pin any app, desktop or store, to your Taskbar.

Even better, you can close them with a right click, just like you're used to:

Windows Store apps can be pinned to the taskbar

And Windows Store apps like Xbox Music that use the Media Controls can also get taskbar enhancements like the Media Controls within the Taskbar button. Here I'm controlling the music in my Windows Store app while I'm in the desktop. The "universal" music controls also pop up when you press your hardware volume keys as well.

Windows Store apps can modify the jump menu

The Start Screen now includes a power button and search button, always.

Windows Start Screen has a visible power button

If you right click a pinned Tile with the mouse (or Shift-F10 with the keyboard) you'll get the familiar context menu. You can change sizes, pin to the taskbar, and more.

Context Menus are in the Start Menu now

There's also some nice subtle changes and features added. This is great for me as I travel a lot. I can manage my known Wi-Fi networks now. This was in Windows 7 and was either removed or hidden. I even wrote a utility to manage Wireless Networks because of this missing feature. Well, it's back.

Manage known WiFi Networks is back

You can move the mouse to the top of a Windows Store app and a title bar will appear. Click in the left side of that title bar, and you can now control Window Splitting.

You can split windows with mouse clicks from the System Menu

Windows Store apps also get Minimize and Close buttons as well.

Windows Store apps have a minimize and close now

Newly installed apps are easier to find and a notification appears on your Start Screen:

"2 new apps installed" notification on the Start Screen

Fullscreen IE11 also has an option to always show open tabs, useful if you're an "out of sight, out of mind" individual.

IE11 Fullscreen can show open tabs now

All in all, it works surprisingly well. I'm moving around Windows faster than before and actually using more Store apps like Mail and Music.

Free Windows 8 and 8.1 Tutorials

I've made this easy link to my free Windows 8 Tutorials. There's a whole playlist up on YouTube and you can get to them from here: http://hanselman.com/windows8 

Please do pass that link along to family and friends, or via Social Media. Thanks!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by ORCS Web

Three all new Windows 8.1 video tutorials - what's new in 8.1, keyboard shortcuts, and managing windows

December 8, '13 Comments [32] Posted in Screencasts | Win8
Sponsored By

I'm really happy with the response from my "Windows 8 moved my cheese" YouTube Tutorial. It's helped thousands of people lose their fear of the change that Windows 8 represents. I encourage you to check it out.

I decided to sit down today and create three more short tutorials that all address Windows 8.1. If you find them useful, please share them with your friends, family, and the people on Twitter and Facebook you call your friends. ;)

I've created a single link to a YouTube Playlist that you can share, or watch them below.

Here's the How to use Windows 8.1 YouTube Playlist.

What's new in Windows 8.1?

Using Windows 8 or 8.1 with a Keyboard

Effectively Managing Multiple Full Screen Windows Store Applicatons

The 25 min Windows 8 Missing Instruction Manual (VIDEO)


Sponsor: Big thanks to Red Gate for sponsoring the blog this week! Easy release management - Deploy your .NET apps, services and SQL Server databases in a single, repeatable process with Red Gate’s Deployment Manager. There’s a free Starter edition, so get started now!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by ORCS Web

Run more apps and show more tiles on your Surface 2 or high-dpi Windows 8.1 Laptop

November 19, '13 Comments [28] Posted in Tools | Win8
Sponsored By
Show more tiles and run more apps on a Microsoft Surface 2

I did a blog post a little while ago about getting real work done on a Surface 2 (ARM & RT) and I've learned a few interesting things since then. The Surface 2 has a great screen. Having 1920x1080p resolution screen on 10.6" screen is really fantastic. In fact, the DPI on the Surface 2 is so nice that working on any other machine (like the 13" 1366x768 laptop I'm writing this on right now) is just unacceptable.

NOTE: This isn't specific to Surface 2. It works on the first Surface Pro, or really, any 1080p or above Windows 8.1 machine!

However, the default DPI settings for both Store Apps and Desktop Apps is set too high, which scales everything and in my opinion this limits you in a few ways. You see fewer tiles on the start screen and can't snap/see more than two Store Apps at a time. If you don't mind smaller on-screen elements, here's a few tricks that will take your high-resolution Surface 2 to the next level. It did mine.

Here's my Start Screen with the default settings as the Surface 2 shipped.

3 rows of Tiles by default

But, if you search for "size" in Settings... (hit the Windows Key+W and type "size")

Size the apps on the screen in Windows 8.1

From this Setting screen, change the Default setting to "Smaller."

Changing Store App sizes

Here's the Start Screen now with the size set to Smaller.

5 rows of tiles

But wait, there's more. Now, go to Settings (Windows Key+C) and click Tiles, then Show More Tiles.

Show more tiles

Now my Start Screen has smaller tiles, but lots more. It's nice to have options.

6 rows of Start Screen Tiles

Here's Mail and News snapped next to each other using the Default DPI setting on the Surface 2.

Mail and News

After changing the setting to Smaller, I can now pull a third application in and the others will get out the way. With 8.1 apps I can resize them to more sizes than 8.0 apps.

 Adding a fourth app and swapping out a third

I prefer the smaller Full Screen/Store DPI setting because I can now read email, check web pages and watch a movie at the same time.

Mail, IE, and Video

I can also bring the Desktop in and run apps over there at the same time I have other Store Apps.

Here I'm running Excel on the Desktop, next to Mail, next to Hulu.

Excel, Mail, and Hulu

After changing Full Screen/Store DPI settings, don't forget you can also changed the DPI for Desktop apps as well. Right click on the Desktop and click Resolution, then "make text and other items larger or smaller." You can play with the settings and find what works. These desktop settings do not change your Store Apps.

Change the size of all items

I hope these tips help you push your own Surface (or any high-DPI laptop) harder.


Sponsor: Thanks to Red Gate for sponsoring the feed this week! Easy release management: Deploy your .NET apps, services and SQL Server databases in a single, repeatable process with Red Gate’s Deployment Manager. There’s a free Starter edition, so get started now!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by ORCS Web

How to sign into Windows 8 or 8.1 without a Microsoft account - make a local user

November 3, '13 Comments [60] Posted in Win8
Sponsored By

I was setting up Windows 8.1 on a machine and didn't want to use a Microsoft ID (Live ID) to sign into it. I didn't feel like linking this temporary machine to my existing Microsoft ID and just wanted a regular local login. Now, I realize that not using a Live ID would limit the things I could do and cause a lot more account popups when I visited apps like Music, Store, Video, and others, but still, I want the choice.

It wasn't immediately obvious to me how to create a local login, so I wrote it up here to help you, Oh Internet Person.

Step 1

When you get to settings, it doesn't matter if you click Use Express Settings or Customize. Pick what makes you happy.

2

Step 2

Setup will ask you to Sign into your Microsoft account. You can, but you don't have to. You can also click "Create a new account" at the bottom. You can click there to create a new online Microsoft account, sure, but this is also how you create a local account.

3

Step 3

At this point, it looks like you'll need to Create a Microsoft account, but you can also click "Sign in without a Microsoft account."

You should really know what you're doing here. Don't just do this because you don't like the idea of a Microsoft account. Be aware of the ramifications. That said, you can always add an account later. I found using a local local to be better for me when making a Virtual Machine.

4

Step 4

Here's where you actually make your local account. Put in a user name and password like you always do. This is a local account that has no ties to the online world.

5

Hope this helps someone.


Sponsor: Big thanks to Telerik Icenium for sponsoring the feed this week! Build and publish iOS & Android apps with Visual Studio using only HTML5 & JavaScript! Telerik Icenium now includes Visual Studio integration. Start a 30 day trial with support now!

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by ORCS Web
Page 1 of 5 in the Win8 category Next Page

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.