Scott Hanselman

Ruby on Rails on Windows is not just possible, it's fabulous using WSL2 and VS Code

July 25, '19 Comments [12] Posted in Linux | Open Source | Ruby | Win10
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I've been trying on and off to enjoy Ruby on Rails development on Windows for many years. I was doing Ruby on Windows as long as 13 years ago. There's been many valiant efforts to make Rails on Windows a good experience. However, given that Windows 10 can run Linux with WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) and now Windows runs Linux at near-native speeds with an actual shipping Linux Kernel using WSL2, Ruby on Rails folks using Windows should do their work in WSL2.

Running Ruby on Rails on Windows

Get a recent Windows 10

WSL2 will be released later this year but for now you can easily get it by signing up for Windows Insiders Fast and making sure your version of Windows is 18945 or greater. Just run "winver" to see your build number. Run Windows Update and get the latest.

Enable WSL2

You'll want the newest Windows Subsystem for Linux. From a PowerShell admin prompt run this:

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Windows-Subsystem-Linux

and head over to the Windows Store and search for "Linux" or get Ubuntu 18.04 LTS directly. Download it, run it, make your sudo user.

Make sure your distro is running at max speed with WSL2. That earlier PowerShell prompt run wsl --list -v to see your distros and their WSL versions.

C:\Users\Scott\Desktop> wsl --list -v
NAME STATE VERSION
* Ubuntu-18.04 Running 2
Ubuntu Stopped 1
WLinux Stopped 1

You can upgrade any WSL1 distro like this, and once it's done, it's done.

wsl --set-version "Ubuntu-18.04" 2

And certainly feel free to get cool fonts and styles and make yourself a nice shiny Linux experience...maybe with the Windows Terminal.

Get the Windows Terminal

Bonus points, get the new open source Windows Terminal for a better experience at the command line. Install it AFTER you've set up Ubuntu or a Linux and it'll auto-populate its menu for you. Otherwise, edit your profiles.json and make a profile with a commandLine like this:

"commandline" : "wsl.exe -d Ubuntu-18.04"

See how I'm calling wsl -d (for distro) with the short name of the distro?

Ubuntu in the Terminal Menu

Since I have a real Ubuntu environment on Windows I can just follow these instructions to set up Rails!

Set up Ruby on Rails

Ubuntu instructions work because it is Ubuntu! https://gorails.com/setup/ubuntu/18.04

Additionally, I can install as as many Linuxes as I want, even a Dev vs. Prod environment if I like. WSL2 is much lighter weight than a full Virtual Machine.

Once Rails is set up, I'll try making a new hello world:

rails new myapp

and here's the result!

Ruby on Rails in the new Windows Terminal

I can also run "explorer.exe ." and launch Windows Explorer and see and manage my Linux files. That's allowed now in WSL2 because it's running a Plan9 server for file access.

Ubuntu files inside Explorer on Windows 10

Install VS Code and the VS Code Remote Extension Pack

I'm going to install the VSCode Remote Extension pack so I can develop from Windows on remote machines OR in WSL or  Container directly. I can click the lower level corner of VS Code or check the Command Palette for this list of menu items. Here I can "Reopen Folder in WSL" and pick the distro I want to use.

Remote options in VS Code

Now that I've opened the folder for development WSL look closely at the lower left corner. You can see I'm in a WSL development mode AND Visual Studio Code is recommending I install a Ruby VS Code extension...inside WSL! I don't even have Ruby and Rails on Windows. I'm going to have the Ruby language servers and VS Code headless parts live in WSL - in Linux - where they'll be the most useful.

Ruby inside WSL

This synergy, this balance between Windows (which I enjoy) and Linux (whose command line I enjoy) has turned out to be super productive. I'm able to do all the work I want - Go, Rust, Python, .NET, Ruby - and move smoothly between environments. There's not a clear separation like there is with the "run it in a VM" solution. I can access my Windows files from /mnt/c from within Linux, and I can always get to my Linux files at \\wsl$ from within Windows.

Note that I'm running rails server -b=0.0.0.0 to bind on all available IPs, and this makes Rails available to "localhost" so I can hit the Rails site from Windows! It's my machine, so it's my localhost (the networking complexities are handled by WSL2).

$ rails server -b=0.0.0.0
=> Booting Puma
=> Rails 6.0.0.rc2 application starting in development
=> Run `rails server --help` for more startup options
Puma starting in single mode...
* Version 3.12.1 (ruby 2.6.2-p47), codename: Llamas in Pajamas
* Min threads: 5, max threads: 5
* Environment: development
* Listening on tcp://0.0.0.0:3000
Use Ctrl-C to stop

Here it is in new Edge (chromium). So this is Ruby on Rails running in WSL, as browsed to from Windows, using the new Edge with Chromium at its heart. Cats and dogs, living together, mass hysteria.

Ruby on Rails on Windows from WSL

Even better, I can install the ruby-debug-ide gem inside WSL and now I'm doing interactive debugging from VS Code, but again, note that the "work" is happening inside WSL.

Debugging Rails on Windows

Enjoy!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Adding Reaction Gifs for your Build System and the Windows Terminal

June 25, '19 Comments [6] Posted in Open Source | PowerShell | Win10
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So, first, I'm having entirely too much fun with the new open source Windows Terminal. If you've got the latest version of Windows (go run Windows Update and do whatever it takes) then you can download the Windows Terminal from the Microsoft Store! This is a preview release (think v0.2) but it'll automatically update, often, from the Windows Store if you have Windows 10 version 18362.0 or higher.

One of the most fun things is that you can have background images. Even animated gifs! You can add those images in your Settings/profile.json like this.

"backgroundImage": "c:/users/scott/desktop/doug.gif",
"backgroundImageOpacity": 0.7,
"backgroundImageStretchMode": "uniformToFill

The profile.json is just JSON and you can update it. I could even update it programmatically if I wanted to parse it and mess about.

BUT. Enterprising developer Chris Duck created a lovely PowerShell Module called MSTerminalSettings that lets you very easily make Profile changes with script.

For example, Mac developers who use iTerm often go to https://iterm2colorschemes.com/ and get new color schemes for their consoles. Now Windows folks can as well!

From his docs, this example downloads the Pandora color scheme from https://iterm2colorschemes.com/ and sets it as the color scheme for the PowerShell Core terminal profile.

Invoke-RestMethod -Uri 'https://raw.githubusercontent.com/mbadolato/iTerm2-Color-Schemes/master/schemes/Pandora.itermcolors' -OutFile .\Pandora.itermcolors
Import-Iterm2ColorScheme -Path .\Pandora.itermcolors -Name Pandora
Get-MSTerminalProfile -Name "PowerShell Core" | Set-MSTerminalProfile -ColorScheme Pandora

That's easy! Then I was talking to Tyler Leonhardt and suggested that we programmatically change the background using a folder full of Animated Gifs. I happen to have such a folder (with 2000 categorized gif classics) so we started coding and streamed the whole debacle on Tyler's Twitch!

The result is Windows Terminal Attract Mode and it's a hot mess and it is up on GitHub and all set up for PowerShell Core.

Remember that "Attract mode" is the mode an idle arcade cabinet goes into in order to attract passersby to play, so clearly the Terminal needs this also.

./AttractMode.ps1 -name "profile name" -path "c:\temp\trouble" -secs 5

It's a proof of concept for now, and it's missing background/runspace support, being wrapped up in a proper module, etc but the idea is solid, building on a solid base, with improvements to idiomatic PowerShell Core already incoming. Right now it'll run forever. Wrap it in Start-Job if you like as well and can stand it.

The next idea was to have reactions gifs to different developer situations. Break the build? Reaction Gif. Passing tests? Reaction Gif.

Here's a silly proof (not refactored) that aliases "dotnet build" to "db" with reactions.

#messing around with build reaction gifs

Function DotNetAlias {
dotnet build
if ($?) {
Start-job -ScriptBlock {
d:\github\TerminalAttractMode\SetMoodGif.ps1 "PowerShell Core" "D:\Dropbox\Reference\Animated Gifs\chrispratt.gif"
Start-Sleep 1.5
d:\github\TerminalAttractMode\SetMoodGif.ps1 "PowerShell Core" "D:\Dropbox\Reference\Animated Gifs\4003cn5.gif"
} | Out-Null
}
else {
Start-job -ScriptBlock {
d:\github\TerminalAttractMode\SetMoodGif.ps1 "PowerShell Core" "D:\Dropbox\Reference\Animated Gifs\idk-girl.gif"
Start-Sleep 1.5
d:\github\TerminalAttractMode\SetMoodGif.ps1 "PowerShell Core" "D:\Dropbox\Reference\Animated Gifs\4003cn5.gif"
} | Out-Null

}
}

Set-Alias -Name db -value DotNetAlias

I added the Start-job stuff so that the build finishes and the Terminal returns control to you while the gifs still are updating. Runspace support would be smart as well.

Some other ideas? Giphy support. Random mood gifs. Pick me ups. You get the idea.

Later, Brandon Olin jumped in with this gem. Why not get a reaction gif if anything goes wrong in your last command? ERRORLEVEL 1? Explode.

Why are we doing this? Because it sparks joy, y'all.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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You can now download the new Open Source Windows Terminal

June 20, '19 Comments [27] Posted in Open Source | Win10
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Last month Microsoft announced a new open source Windows Terminal! It's up at https://github.com/microsoft/Terminal and it's great, but for the last several weeks you've had to build it yourself as a Developer. It's been very v0.1 if you know what I mean.

Today you can download the Windows Terminal from the Microsoft Store! This is a preview release (think v0.2) but it'll automatically update, often, from the Windows Store if you have Windows 10 version 18362.0 or higher. Run "winver" to make sure.

Windows Terminal

If you don't see any tabs, hit Ctrl-T and note the + and the pull down menu at the top there. Under the menu go to Settings to open profiles.json. Here's mine on one machine.

Here's some Hot Windows Terminal Tips

You can do background images, even animated, with opacity (with useAcrylic off):

"backgroundImage": "c:/users/scott/desktop/doug.gif",
"backgroundImageOpacity": 0.7,
"backgroundImageStretchMode": "uniformToFill

You can edit the key bindings to your taste in the "key bindings" section. For now, be specific, so the * might be expressed as Ctrl+Shift+8, for example.

Try other things like cursor shape and color, history size, as well as different fonts for each tab.

 "cursorShape": "vintage"

If you're using WSL or WSL2, use the distro name like this in your new profile:

"wsl.exe -d Ubuntu-18.04"

If you like Font Ligatures or use Powerline, consider Fira Code as a potential new font.

I'd recommend you PIN terminal to your taskbar and start menu, but you can run windows terminal from the command "wt" from Windows R or from anotherc console. That's just "wt" and enter!

Try not just "Ctrl+Mouse Scroll" but also "Ctrl+Shift+Mouse Scroll" and get your your whole life!

Remember that the definition of a shell is someone fluid, so check out Azure Cloud Shell, in your terminal!

Windows Terminal menus

Also, let's start sharing nice color profiles! Share your new ones as a Gist in this format. Note the name.

{
"background" : "#2C001E",
"black" : "#4E9A06",
"blue" : "#3465A4",
"brightBlack" : "#555753",
"brightBlue" : "#729FCF",
"brightCyan" : "#34E2E2",
"brightGreen" : "#8AE234",
"brightPurple" : "#AD7FA8",
"brightRed" : "#EF2929",
"brightWhite" : "#EEEEEE",
"brightYellow" : "#FCE94F",
"cyan" : "#06989A",
"foreground" : "#EEEEEE",
"green" : "#300A24",
"name" : "UbuntuLegit",
"purple" : "#75507B",
"red" : "#CC0000",
"white" : "#D3D7CF",
"yellow" : "#C4A000"
}

Note also that this should be the beginning of a wonderful Windows Console ecosystem. This isn't the one terminal to end them all, it's the one to start them all. I've loved alternative consoles for YEARS, whether it be ConEmu or Console2 many years ago, I've long declared that Text Mode is a missed opportunity.

Remember also that Terminal !== Shell and that you can bring your shell of choice into your Terminal of choice! If you want the deep architectural dive, be sure to watch the BUILD 2019 technical talk with some of the developers or read about ConPTY and how to integrate with it!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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A new Console for Windows - It's the open source Windows Terminal

May 3, '19 Comments [18] Posted in Open Source | Win10
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"My fellow Windows users, our long national nightmare is over." The Windows Terminal is here, it's open source, it's real, and it's spectacular. It's very early days to be clear, but the new Windows Terminal is open source and it's up at https://github.com/microsoft/Terminal for you to check out.

The repository includes

  • Windows Terminal
  • The Windows console host (conhost.exe) - a local copy that is separate from the built-in Windows one. 
  • Components shared between the two projects
  • ColorTool
  • Sample projects that show how to consume the Windows Console API

And even better, it'll be, as they say:

Windows Terminal will be delivered via the Microsoft Store in Windows 10 and will be updated regularly, ensuring you are always up to date and able to enjoy the newest features and latest improvements with minimum effort.

How do you get it? TODAY you clone the repo and build your own copy. There will be early builds in the Store this summer and 1.0 should be out before the end of the year.

As of today, the Windows Terminal and Windows Console have been made open source and you can clone, build, run, and test the code from the repository on GitHub: https://github.com/Microsoft/Terminal

This summer in 2019, Windows Terminal previews will be released to the Microsoft Store for early adopters to use and provide feedback.

This winter in 2019, our goal is to launch Windows Terminal 1.0 and we’ll work with the community to ensure it’s ready before we release!

So today, yes, it'll take some effort if you want to play with it today. But good things are worth a little effort. Here's some of the things I've done to mine. I hope you make your Windows Terminal your own as well!

Windows Terminal

When you click the menu, check out Settings, which will open your profile.json in your JSON editor. I use VS Code to edit. You'll need to run Format Document to make the JSON look nice as today it may show up on one line.

You can create color profiles in the "schemes" node. For example, here's my "UbuntuLegit" color theme in my profiles.json.

{
"name": "UbuntuLegit",
"foreground": "#EEEEEE",
"background": "#2C001E",
"colors": [
"#4E9A06", "#CC0000", "#300A24", "#C4A000",
"#3465A4", "#75507B", "#06989A", "#D3D7CF",
"#555753", "#EF2929", "#8AE234", "#FCE94F",
"#729FCF", "#AD7FA8", "#34E2E2", "#EEEEEE"
]
}

Here's an example profile with all the settings I know about set. This is for "CMD.exe"

"profiles": [
{
"startingDirectory": "C:/Users/Scott/Desktop",
"guid": "{7d04ce37-c00f-43ac-ba47-992cb1393215}",
"name": "DOS but not DOS",
"colorscheme": "Solarized Dark",
"historySize": 9001,
"snapOnInput": true,
"cursorColor": "#00FF00",
"cursorHeight": 25,
"cursorShape": "vintage",
"commandline": "cmd.exe",
"fontFace": "Cascadia Code",
"fontSize": 20,
"acrylicOpacity": 0.85,
"useAcrylic": true,
"closeOnExit": false,
"padding": "0, 0, 0, 0",
"icon": "ms-appdata:///roaming/cmd-32.png"
},

I like the "vintage" cursor and I make it bright green. I can also add icons in this location:

%LOCALAPPDATA%\packages\Microsoft.WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbwe\RoamingState

So I put some 32x32 PNGs in that folder and then I can reference them as seen above with ms-appdata://

Cool Icons

I'll go into more detail about what's happening in each of these profiles/tabs in the next post! I've got a few creative ideas for taking MY Windows Terminal to the next level.

"defaultProfile": "{7d04ce37-c00f-43ac-ba47-992cb1393215}",
"initialRows": 30,
"initialCols": 120,
"alwaysShowTabs": true,
"showTerminalTitleInTitlebar": true,
"experimental_showTabsInTitlebar": true,
"requestedTheme": "dark",

Here I've set the theme to dark using "requestedTheme" even though I run Windows in a light theme. I'm setting the tabs to be shown all the time and moved the tabs into the TitleBar.

Here's my Ubuntu tab with the UbuntuLegit color theme above:

Nice Ubuntu Colors

Notice I'm also using Powerline in my prompt. I'm using Fira Code which has the glyphs I need but you can certainly use patched Powerline fonts or make your own fonts with tools like those from Nerd Fonts and it's font patcher. This font patcher is often used to take your favorite monospace font and add Powerline glyphs to it.

NOTE: If you see any weird spacing issues with glyphs you might try using --use-single-width-glyphs to work around it. By release all these little issues I assume will be worked out. I had no issues with Fira Code in my case, your mileage may vary.

This new Windows Terminal is great. As mentioned, it's super early days but it's amazingly fast, runs on your GPU (the current conhost runs on your CPU) and it's VERY configurable.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to remove words from the Windows Autocorrect Spell Check Dictionary

December 7, '18 Comments [6] Posted in Win10
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Well crap. I was typing really fast and got a squiggly, so I right-clicked on it and rather than selecting the correct word from the autocorrect dictionary, I clicked Add To Dictionary.

I added the MISSPELLED WORD to the Dictionary! Now Windows is suggesting that I spell this word (and others) wrong in all apps.

At this point I also realized that I had no idea how to REMOVE a word from the Windows Spell Check Dictionary. However, I do know that Windows isn't a black box so there must be a dictionary somewhere. It's gotta be a file or a registry key or something, right?

It's even easier than I thought it would be. The Windows 10 custom dictionaries are at %AppData%\Microsoft\Spelling\

The Windows 10 custom dictionaries are at %AppData%\Microsoft\Spelling\

I just opened the default.dic file in Notepad and removed the misspelled word.

Opening default.dic in Notepad

Whew. I can't tell you how many wrong words have found there way in there over the years. Hope this helps you in some small way.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.