Scott Hanselman

What would a cross-platform .NET UI Framework look like? Exploring Avalonia

September 21, '17 Comments [25] Posted in Open Source | WPF
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Many years ago before WPF was the "Windows Presentation Foundation" and introduced XAML as a UI markup language for .NET, Windows, and more, there was a project codenamed "Avalon." Avalon was WPF's codename. XAML is everywhere now, and the XAML Standard is a vocabulary specification.

Avalonia is an open source project that clearly takes its inspiration from Avalon and has an unapologetic love for XAML. Steven Kirk (GitHubber by day) and a team of nearly 50 contributors are asking what would a cross-platform .NET UI Framework look like. WPF without the W, if you will.

Avalonia (formerly known as Perspex) is a multi-platform .NET UI framework. It can run on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, iOS and Android.

YOU can try out the latest build of Avalonia available for download here:https://ci.appveyor.com/project/AvaloniaUI/Avalonia/branch/master/artifacts and probably get the "ControlCatalog.Desktop" zip file at the bottom. It includes a complete running sample app that will let you explore the available controls.

Avalonia is cross-platform XAML ZOMG

It's important note that while Avalonia may smell like WPF, it's not WPF. It's not cross-platform WPF - it's Avalonia. Make sense? Avalonia does styles differently than WPF, and actually has a lot of subtle but significant syntax improvements.

Avalonia is a multi-platform windowing toolkit - somewhat like WPF - that is intended to be multi- platform. It supports XAML, lookless controls and a flexible styling system, and runs on Windows using Direct2D and other operating systems using Gtk & Cairo.

It's in an alpha state but there's an active community excited about it and there's even a Visual Studio Extension (VSIX) to help you get File | New Project support and create an app fast. You can check out the source for the sample apps here https://github.com/AvaloniaUI/Avalonia/tree/master/samples.

Just in the last few weeks you can see commits as they explore what a Linux-based .NET Core UI app would look like.

You can get an idea of what can be done with a framework like this by taking a look at how someone forked the MSBuildStructuredLog utility and ported it to Avalonia - making it cross-platform - in just hours. You can see a video of the port in action on Twitter. There is also a cross-platform REST client you can use to call your HTTP Web APIs at https://github.com/x2bool/restofus written with Avalonia.

The project is active but also short on documentation. I'm SURE that they'd love to hear from you on Twitter or in the issues on GitHub. Perhaps you could start contributing to open source and help Avalonia out!

What do you think?


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Fixing System.Core 2.0.5 FileLoadException, Portable Libraries and Windows XP support

May 8, '14 Comments [17] Posted in Bugs | Learning .NET | WPF
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Installing Windows XP to testMy buddy Greg and I are getting ready to launch our little side startup, and I was going through our product backlog. Our app consists of a global cloud service with Signalr, an iPhone app made with Xamarin tools, and a WPF app.

One of the items in our Trello backlog was "Support Windows XP. Gasp!"

I hadn't given this item much thought, but I figure it was worth a few hours look. If it was easy, why not, right?

Our WPF desktop application was written for .NET 4.5, which isn't supported on Windows XP.  I want to my app to support as basic and mainstream a .NET 4 installation as possible.

Could I change my app to target .NET 4 directly? I use the new async and await features extensively.

Well, of course, I remembered Microsoft released the Async Targeting Pack (Microsoft.Bcl.Async) through NuGet to do just this. In fact, if I was targeting .NET 3.5 I could use Omer Mor's AsyncBridge for .NET 3.5, so it's good that I have choices.

I changed my project to target .NET 4, rather than 4.5, installed these NuGets, and recompiled. No problem, right?

However, when I run my application on Windows XP it crashes immediately. Fortunately I have instrumented it with Raygun.io so all my crashes to to the cloud for analysis. It gives me this nice summary:

raygun.io is amazing 

Here's the important part:

FileLoadException: Could not load file or assembly 
'System.Core, Version=2.0.5.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=7cec85d7bea7798e, Retargetable=Yes'
or one of its dependencies. The given assembly name or codebase was invalid.
(Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131047)

That's weird, I'm using .NET 4 which includes System.Core version 4.0. I can confirm what's in the GAC (Global Assembly Cache) with this command at the command line. Remember, your computer isn't a black box.

C:\>gacutil /l | find /i "system.core"
System.Core, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089, processorArchitecture=MSIL
System.Core, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089, processorArchitecture=MSIL

OK, so there isn't even a System.Core version 2.0.5 in the GAC. Turns out that System.Core 2.0.5 is the Portable Libraries version, meant to be used everywhere (that means, Silverlight, etc, everywhere) so they made the version number compatible.

Because we're building our iPhone app with Xamarin tools and we anticipate supporting other platforms, we use a Portable Library to share code. But, it seems that support for Portable Libraries were enabled on .NET 4 vanilla by the KB2468871 update.

I don't want to require any specific patch level or hotfixes. While this .NET 4 framework update was pushed to machines via Windows Update, for now I want to support the most basic install if I can. So if the issue is Portable Libraries (which I still want to use) then I'll want to bring those shared files in another way.

You can LINK source code in Visual Studio when you Add File by clicking the little dropdown and then Add as Link:

Adding source code as a Link within Visual Studio

Now my Messages.cs file is a link. See the little shortcut overlay in blue?

A linked file as a little overlay on the icon

I removed the project reference to the Portable Library for this WPF application and brought the code in this way. I'm still sharing core, but just not as a binary for this one application.

Recompile and redeploy and magically .NET 4 WPF application with async/await and MahApps.Metro styling starts up and runs wonderfully on this 12 year old OS with just .NET 4 installed.

For our application this means that my market just got opened up a little and now I can sell my product to the millions of pirated and forever unpatched Windows XP machines in the world. Which is a good thing.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to display a QR code in ASP.NET and WPF

January 19, '14 Comments [26] Posted in ASP.NET | NuGetPOW | WPF
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qrcode.19303638I've half-jokingly said that there's never a good reason to use a QR Code. However, I'm working on an MVP (minimally viable product) for a small startup with Greg Shackles and we actually have a good reason to use one. We have a mobile device, a Web Site, and a Windows Application, and a QR Code is a pretty quick way to move data between the mobile device and the other applications without the mess of Bluetooth pairing.

As I mentioned, we display the QR code on an ASP.NET website, as well as within a Windows app that happens to be written in WPF. The iPhone app uses C# and Xamarin.

There's a great QR Code library called "ZXing" (Zebra Crossing) with ports in Java and also in C#. The C#/.NET one, ZXing.NET is a really fantastically well put together project with assemblies available for everything from .NET 2 to 4.5, Windows RT, Unity3D, Portable libraries and more. The site is filled with demo clients as well, although we didn't find one for ASP.NET or WPF. No matter, it's all just generating and showing PNGs.

I pulled in ZXing.NET from the NuGet package here, just install-package ZXing.Net.

How to display a QR code in ASP.NET

If you're generating a QR code with ASP.NET MVC, you'll have the page that the code lives on, but then you'll need to decide if you want to make an HTTP Handler that generates the graphic, like:

<img src="/path/to/httphandlerthatmakesQRcodepng">

or, you could take a different approach like we did, and embed the code in the HTML page itself.

Greg used an HTML Helper to output the entire image tag, including the inlined image, as in:

<img src="data:image/gif;base64,iVBORw0KG..." />            

Images in HTML directly as Data URIs are super fun and I think, often forgotten. If you show one to the average web dev they'll say "oh, ya...I knew about those, but never really used it." In fact, Data URIs have been around for a LONG time. Learn more about them at DataUrl.net.

Here's generating a QR Code within ASP.NET MVC from an HTML Helper:

public static class HtmlHelperExtensions
{
public static IHtmlString GenerateRelayQrCode(this HtmlHelper html, string groupName, int height = 250, int width = 250, int margin = 0)
{
var qrValue = "whatever data you want to put in here";
var barcodeWriter = new BarcodeWriter
{
Format = BarcodeFormat.QR_CODE,
Options = new EncodingOptions
{
Height = height,
Width = width,
Margin = margin
}
};

using (var bitmap = barcodeWriter.Write(qrValue))
using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
{
bitmap.Save(stream, ImageFormat.Gif);

var img = new TagBuilder("img");
img.MergeAttribute("alt", "your alt tag");
img.Attributes.Add("src", String.Format("data:image/gif;base64,{0}",
Convert.ToBase64String(stream.ToArray())));

return MvcHtmlString.Create(img.ToString(TagRenderMode.SelfClosing));
}
}
}

Nice and simple. The BarcodeWriter class within ZXing.NET does the hard work. We don't need to save our QR Code to disk, and because we're doing it inline from our HTML page via this helper, there's no need for a separate call to get the image. Also, the caching policy that we decide to use for the page applies to the image within, simplifying things vs. two calls.

How to display a QR code in WPF

Note: This code here may be wrong. I'm happy to hear your suggestion, Dear Reader, because I'm either missing something completely or there is no clear and clean way to get from a System.Drawing.Bitmap to a System.Windows.Media.imaging.BitmapImage. The little dance here with the saving to a MemoryStream, then moving into a BitmapImage (with the unintuitive but totally required setting of CacheOption as well) just sets off my Spideysense. It can't be right, although it works.

I'll update the post when/if a cleaner way is found.

See below for update!

First, the exact same BarcodeWriter usage from the ZXing.NET library.

var qrcode = new QRCodeWriter();
var qrValue = "your magic here";

var barcodeWriter = new BarcodeWriter
{
Format = BarcodeFormat.QR_CODE,
Options = new EncodingOptions
{
Height = 300,
Width = 300,
Margin = 1
}
};

using (var bitmap = barcodeWriter.Write(qrValue))
using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
{
bitmap.Save(stream, ImageFormat.Png);

BitmapImage bi = new BitmapImage();
bi.BeginInit();
stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
bi.StreamSource = stream;
bi.CacheOption = BitmapCacheOption.OnLoad;
bi.EndInit();
QRCode.Source = bi; //A WPF Image control
}

Later, writing the Bitmap to a MemoryStream for manipulation, except in this case, we're putting the QR Code into the Source property of a WPF Image Control.

UPDATE: Thomas Levesque in the comments below suggests an extension within System.Windows.Interop (which explains me not finding it) called CreateBitmapSourceFromHBitmap. This still feels gross as it appears to requires a call to the native DeleteObject, but regardless, that's the price you pay I guess. It looks like this:

using (var bitmap = barcodeWriter.Write(qrValue))
{
var hbmp = bitmap.GetHbitmap();
try
{
var source = Imaging.CreateBitmapSourceFromHBitmap(hbmp, IntPtr.Zero, Int32Rect.Empty, System.Windows.Media.Imaging.BitmapSizeOptions.FromEmptyOptions());
QRCode.Source = source;
}
finally
{
DeleteObject(hbmp);
}
}

It works well!


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Introducing Lync 2010 Super Simple Auto Answer Video Kiosk with Full Screen

July 3, '12 Comments [25] Posted in Lync | Open Source | Remote Work | WPF
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Logitech BCC950 Conference CamIf you check out my blog archives or check out the Remote Work category you'll see that I'm always tinkering with my remote work situation. I'm the most interested in high quality and pervasive video. I'm so interested in this that for a while I was running a 10 hour a day persistent "Portal" between Portland and Seattle. I still highly recommend this for co-located teams that have the bandwidth to burn. It's great to be able to turn one's head and see their teammate right there by their side - even though they are 200 miles away.

I recently picked up a pair of Logitech BCC950 Conference Cams as a possible replacement for the very expensive "RoundTables" that some rooms at Microsoft have. The RoundTables are lovely but they are becoming scarce at the office and the Logitech is literally one-tenth the price. I'll blog a full and detailed review of the BCC950 later on this week but for now my biggest issue was that the Video Kiosk software I was using was starting to show its age. It's flaky and unreliable and build on the Office Communicator 2007 interfaces while I've been on Lync 2010 for a while.

Additionally, the researchers that wrote the software are always adding features I don't need for hardware I don't have. My remote buddy Damian Edwards and I decided we needed to make a software break.

Features

We want these simple features to start:

  • Auto-answer of video calls - possibly with some whitelist for security
  • Auto-fullscreen of video calls on the remote machine - the single purpose kiosk in my Seattle office
  • Presence information and a simple UI for making calls - by simple I mean "my boss's boss" simple
  • Remote control of Pan Tilt Zoom (PTZ) features on the same - ideally using the standard "inbox UVC" drivers and no 3rd party software

Tonight I sat down and did the first three of these and put it on GitHub. I call it - wait for it - the Lync 2012 Super Simple Auto Answer Video Kiosk with Full Screen since the name "SmartGlass" was already taken. ;)

I searched ALL over to find out if there was SOME sample code out there that would just auto-answer a call from Lync and start video. I could find dozens of samples that made calls, that started chats, but none that would answer and auto-start video. You'd think this would be the FIRST thing that folks would want to do. I can only assume it's not a setting for security reasons.

Auto-Answering Lync Calls with Video

Now, it's late and there's likely problems so pull requests are welcome if I have done something stupid. Lync is complex and while you'd think there'd be an "AutoAnswer = true" it's actually a more complex API than that. I started from this MSDN article on "Responding to a Lync Conversation Invitation."

var lync = LyncClient.GetClient();
var conversationmgr = lync.ConversationManager;
conversationmgr.ConversationAdded += (_, cmea) =>
{
bool IncomingAV = false;
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

//Is this an audio/video invitation?
if (cmea.Conversation.Modalities[ModalityTypes.AudioVideo].State == ModalityState.Notified)
{
if (lync.DeviceManager.ActiveAudioDevice != null)
{
sb.Append("Incoming call from ");
IncomingAV = true;
}
else
{
cmea.Conversation.Modalities[ModalityTypes.AudioVideo].Reject(ModalityDisconnectReason.NotAcceptableHere);
}
}
if (cmea.Conversation.Modalities[ModalityTypes.InstantMessage].State == ModalityState.Connected)
{
sb.Append("Incoming IM from ");
}
sb.Append(String.Join(", ", cmea.Conversation.Participants.Select(i => i.Contact.Uri)));
Debug.WriteLine(sb.ToString());

if (IncomingAV == true && Properties.Settings.Default.autoAnswer == true) //I added that setting later on
{
InitiateAVStream(cmea.Conversation);
}
};

You watch for a Conversation to start and see if it's an Audio/Video on. If it is, then we call our InitiateAVStream method. You can't do all this stuff synchronously as Lync is full of async native COM APIs and events that you need to respond to. Here we accept the video which lets us see who called us but doesn't yet start OUR video. Remember "we" are the dumb Kiosk who is receiving a call from me.

private static void InitiateAVStream(Conversation pConversation)
{
if (pConversation.State == ConversationState.Terminated) { return; }

if (pConversation.Modalities[ModalityTypes.AudioVideo].CanInvoke(ModalityAction.Connect))
{
var video = (AVModality)pConversation.Modalities[ModalityTypes.AudioVideo];
video.Accept();

//Get ready to be connected, then WE can start OUR video
video.ModalityStateChanged += _AVModality_ModalityStateChanged;
}
}

See how they are chaining handlers? I think this code could be made cleaner with a series of nested closures like above in the ConversationAdded example, but then again, maybe not. It'll get four deep before we're done.

Now the call is being connected but perhaps not yet. When its state changes the VideoChannel has opened up and we watch for the video to be received.

static void _AVModality_ModalityStateChanged(object sender, ModalityStateChangedEventArgs e)
{
VideoChannel vc = null;
switch (e.NewState)
{
//we can't start video until it's connected
case ModalityState.Connected:
if (vc == null)
{
vc = ((AVModality)sender).VideoChannel;
vc.StateChanged += new EventHandler<ChannelStateChangedEventArgs>(_VideoChannel_StateChanged);
}
break;
}
}

As the video starts up, I can see if the system is ready for the Kiosk to start its video. If so, we call BeginStart (and the SDK says we HAVE to call EndStart, so watch out!).

static void _VideoChannel_StateChanged(object sender, ChannelStateChangedEventArgs e)
{
VideoChannel vc = (VideoChannel)sender;

//Are we receiving? Let's try to send!
if (e.NewState == ChannelState.Receive)
{
if (vc.CanInvoke(ChannelAction.Start))
{
vc.BeginStart(videoCallBack, vc);
}
else { Debug.WriteLine("CanInvoke said NO!"); }

//Go looking around for the IM Window (there had better just be the one we just started)
// and force it to the foreground
IntPtr childHandle = UnsafeNativeMethods.FindWindowEx(IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero, "IMWindowClass", null);
UnsafeNativeMethods.SetForegroundWindow(childHandle);

//Try to get the video to go full screen by pressing F5
WindowsInput.InputSimulator.SimulateKeyPress(WindowsInput.VirtualKeyCode.F5);
}
}


private static void videoCallBack(IAsyncResult ar)
{
((VideoChannel)ar.AsyncState).EndStart(ar);
}

I'm pretty frustrated as while this is SUPER powerful, it's also SUPER complex for basic scenarios in my opinion. I think there's an opportunity here for a small layer on top of Lync that handles the 80% cases like the small Lync Abstraction  layer introduced in this "ScreenPop" example application.

The Goodness - The WPF Controls

At this point in the code I had everything working in a Console Application. You can go cherry-pick that commit if you want just a Console app that Auto-Answers video calls from Lync.

Even though I NEED to stop as I've got it working in a Console and I should be sleeping I noticed this in Visual Studio and it was too epic to not try.

File | New Lync WPF Application

You know how it is. It's 2am, you're done with your goals. OF COURSE you're going to try to convert your Console App to a GUI before bed. Of course.

Turns out there's a MESS of visual controls that you can put into existing applications to make them Lync-ified in literally minutes.

All the Lync Controls like SendEmailButton and StartVideoCallButton

Ok, awesome. I took the basic UI and added a checkbox for "Auto Answer."

Perhaps the lamest UI ever. It's a head, a button and a checkbox

(ASIDE: You DO realize that the outline of the "unknown face" in Lync there looks an AWFUL lot like Bill Gates' legendary 1977 mug shot, right? I just noticed that.)

Lync 2010's default Person matches the outline of Bill Gates' 1977 Mug Shot

Anyway, then I made two settings, one for my "sip" address (that's in my app.config file as "sipEmailAddress" and one boolean for AutoAnswer. The complete XAML is just:

<Window x:Class="SuperSimpleLyncKiosk.Main"
xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
xmlns:properties="clr-namespace:SuperSimpleLyncKiosk.Properties"
xmlns:controls="clr-namespace:Microsoft.Lync.Controls;assembly=Microsoft.Lync.Controls"
Title="The World's Simplest Lync Kiosk (with Auto Answer, too!)" Height="Auto" Width="Auto">
<Grid RenderTransformOrigin="0.5,0.5">
<Grid.RenderTransform>
<ScaleTransform ScaleX="3" ScaleY="3"/>
</Grid.RenderTransform>

<StackPanel Orientation="Vertical" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center">
<StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center">
<!-- Show the presence indicator. Hover over the icon to see the contact card.
Set Source to a valid SIP URI in your organization. -->
<controls:PresenceIndicator
x:Name="Presence"
Source="{Binding Source={x:Static properties:Settings.Default}, Path=sipEmailAddress, Mode=OneWay}"
PhotoDisplayMode="Large"
/>
<!-- Use the DisplayName property from PresenceIndicator to show the user's name -->
<TextBlock
Text="{Binding DisplayName, ElementName=Presence}"
Margin="4,0,0,0"
VerticalAlignment="Center"
/>
<controls:StartVideoCallButton Source="{Binding Source={x:Static properties:Settings.Default}, Path=sipEmailAddress, Mode=OneWay}" x:Name="startVideoCall" />
<controls:ShareDesktopButton Source="{Binding Source={x:Static properties:Settings.Default}, Path=sipEmailAddress, Mode=OneWay}"/>
</StackPanel>
<CheckBox IsChecked="{Binding Source={x:Static properties:Settings.Default}, Path=autoAnswer, Mode=TwoWay}" Content="Auto Answer Video Calls"/>
</StackPanel>
</Grid>

</Window>

I also added a 3x transform to scale ALL these default controls so they'd look good on the 42" TV that is sitting in my office. Because they are native WPF vector controls they just scale perfectly to high resolutions without raster jaggies.

Then I added a call to make the app Maximized by default:

this.WindowState = System.Windows.WindowState.Maximized;

And it looks like this when running:

The World's Simplest Lync Kiosk (with Auto Answer, too!)

And when I call it automatically answers. Looks like everyone's asleep and they've turned the lights out!

My Remote office in Seattle

Ah, I but I wish it was full screen so the people in Redmond don't need to do anything or touch anything...

The Badness

I can auto-answer calls but sometimes the window isn't in front and once it gets in front there's no programmatic way to tell Lync to go Fullscreen with video.

Two bad problems there. Both solved by breaking all the rules. I get the Window Class with a big assumption that the Kiosk only as one chat window open and then I "push" F5 which is the Lync hotkey for fullscreen video.

//Go looking around for the IM Window (there had better just be the one we just started)
// and force it to the foreground
IntPtr childHandle = UnsafeNativeMethods.FindWindowEx(IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero, "IMWindowClass", null);
UnsafeNativeMethods.SetForegroundWindow(childHandle);
//Try to get the video to go full screen by pressing F5
WindowsInput.InputSimulator.SimulateKeyPress(WindowsInput.VirtualKeyCode.F5);

Those last two, of course, are calls directly into Win32 from .NET:

public static class UnsafeNativeMethods
{
[DllImport("user32.dll")]
public static extern IntPtr FindWindowEx(IntPtr parentHandle, IntPtr childAfter, string className, string windowTitle);

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
public static extern bool SetForegroundWindow(IntPtr hWnd);
}

But, it works! It's scandalous that this isn't built into the Lync SDK. Developers who are fans of Lync or who work on it all the time will say that my attempt at a "poor man's Kiosk" is silly and that I really want to use "UI Suppression in Lync" and just make an app that hosts Lync rather than automates Lync. They are likely right. However, frankly, it looked super-hard and I was tired. So, ya. If anyone wants to work on the Kiosk with me to make it simple answer and start video and do it all without showing Lync, that'd be awesome.

Thanks

I also want to make a special nod to the InputSimulator library. It's amazing and it just works. It's WAY WAY better than SendKeys which you should stop using NOW.

The Windows Input Simulator provides a simple .NET (C#) interface to simulate Keyboard or Mouse input using the Win32 SendInput method. All of the Interop is done for you and there's a simple programming model for sending multiple keystrokes.

Enjoy!

Lync Developer Resources

Related Links

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Hanselminutes Podcast 241 - The MVVM Pattern with Laurent Bugnion

November 19, '10 Comments [2] Posted in Open Source | Podcast | Silverlight | WPF
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Scott talks to Laurent Bugnion about the often misunderstood Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) pattern. What's the different between this pattern and MVC? Can I use this pattern for Silverlight, WPF and Windows Phone 7, and what Open Source projects can support this pattern?

Links from the Show

NOTE: If you want to download our complete archives as a feed - that's all 241 shows, subscribe to the Complete MP3 Feed here.

Also, please do take a moment and review the show on iTunes.

Subscribe: Subscribe to Hanselminutes Subscribe to my Podcast in iTunes

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Do also remember the complete archives are always up and they have PDF Transcripts, a little known feature that show up a few weeks after each show.

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Enjoy. Who knows what'll happen in the next show?

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.