Scott Hanselman

Installing the .NET Core 2.x SDK on a Raspberry Pi and Blinking an LED with System.Device.Gpio

January 16, '19 Comments [9] Posted in DotNetCore | Hardware | Open Source
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The CrowPi from Elecrow is an amazing STEM KitI've written about running .NET Core on Raspberry Pis before, although support was initially limited. Now that Linux ARM32 is a supported distro, what else can we do?

We can certainly quickly and easily install Docker on a Raspberry Pi and be running C# and .NET Core programs in minutes. We can run .NET Core in a stack of Raspberry Pis as a Kubernetes Cluster, making our own tiny cloud and install a serverless platform in it like OpenFaas!

If you have a Raspberry Pi 3 with Raspbian on it like I do, check out https://dotnet.microsoft.com/download/dotnet-core/2.2 and note that last part of the URL. You can ask for /2.1, /2.0, etc, just in case you're reading this post in the future, like tomorrow. ;) Everything is always at https://dotnet.microsoft.com/download/archives so you can tell what's Current and what's not.

For example, if I end up here https://dotnet.microsoft.com/download/thank-you/dotnet-sdk-2.2.102-linux-arm32-binaries I can grab the exact blob URL from the "try again" link and then wget it on my Raspberry Pi. You'll want to get a few prerequisites first. Note these blob links change when new stuff comes out, so you'll want to double check to get latest.

sudo apt-get install curl libunwind8 gettext
wget https://download.visualstudio.microsoft.com/download/pr/9650e3a6-0399-4330-a363-1add761127f9/14d80726c16d0e3d36db2ee5c11928e4/dotnet-sdk-2.2.102-linux-arm.tar.gz
wget https://download.visualstudio.microsoft.com/download/pr/9d049226-1f28-4d3d-a4ff-314e56b223c5/f67ab05a3d70b2bff46ff25e2b3acd2a/aspnetcore-runtime-2.2.1-linux-arm.tar.gz

I got the Linux ARM 32-bit SDK as well as the ASP.NET Runtime so I have those packages available for any web apps I choose to make.

Then we'll extract. You can set it up as a user off of $HOME or in /opt/dotnet and then link to /usr/local/bin.

mkdir -p $HOME/dotnet && tar zxf dotnet-sdk-2.2.102-linux-arm.tar.gz -C $HOME/dotnet
export DOTNET_ROOT=$HOME/dotnet
export PATH=$PATH:$HOME/dotnet

Don't forget to untar the ASP.NET Runtime as well.

tar zxf aspnetcore-runtime-2.2.1-linux-arm.tar.gz -C $HOME/dotnet

Cool. You will want to add the PATH to your profile if you want it to survive restarts. Then run "dotnet --info" to see if it works.

pi@crowpi:~ $ dotnet --info
.NET Core SDK (reflecting any global.json):
Version: 2.2.102

Runtime Environment:
OS Name: raspbian
OS Version: 9
OS Platform: Linux
RID: linux-arm
Base Path: /home/pi/dotnet/sdk/2.2.102/

Host (useful for support):
Version: 2.2.1

.NET Core SDKs installed:
2.2.102 [/home/pi/dotnet/sdk]

.NET Core runtimes installed:
Microsoft.AspNetCore.All 2.2.1 [/home/pi/dotnet/shared/Microsoft.AspNetCore.All]
Microsoft.AspNetCore.App 2.2.1 [/home/pi/dotnet/shared/Microsoft.AspNetCore.App]
Microsoft.NETCore.App 2.2.1 [/home/pi/dotnet/shared/Microsoft.NETCore.App]

Looks good.

At this point I have BOTH the .NET Core runtime (for running stuff) as well as all the ASP.NET runtime for web apps or little microservices AND the .NET SDK which means I can actually compile code (slowly) on the Pi itself. It's up to me/you. If you aren't ever going to develop (compile code) on the Raspberry Pi, you can just install the runtime, but I think it's nice to be prepared.

I am installing all this on a wonderful Raspberry Pi kit called a "CrowPi." They had a successful KickStarter and are now selling a Raspberry Pi Educational Kit with an attached custom board with dozens of components. Rather than having to connect motion sensors, soud sensors, touch sensors, switches, buttons, and carry around a bunch of wires, you can experiment and play with stuff in a very organized case that also has a 7inch HDMI touch screen. They also have 21 great Python Video Courses on their YouTube Channel on how to get started with hardware. It's a joy of a device. More on that later.

NOTE: I talked to the #CrowPi people and they gave me an Amazon COUPON that's ~$70 off! The coupon is 8EMCVI56 and will work until Jan 31, add it during checkout. The Advanced Kit is at https://amzn.to/2SVtXl2 #ref and includes everything, touchscreen, keyboard, mouse, power, SNES controllers, motors, etc. I will be doing a full review soon. Short review is, it's amazing.

Now that .NET Core is installed, I can start exploring the fun happening over at https://github.com/dotnet/iot. It's filled with lots of new functionality inside of System.Device.Gpio. Remember that GPIO means "General Purpose Input/Output" which, on a Raspberry Pi, is connected to a ribbon cable on the CrowPi with lots of cool sensors ready to go!

I could build my Raspberry Pi apps on my Windows/Mac/Linux machine and I'll find it much faster to compile. Then I can "scp" (secure copy) it over to the Pi. It's nice to point out that Windows 10 includes scp.exe now by default!

In this example, by adding -r linux-arm I'm copying a complete self-contained app over the Pi, so don't actually need to install .NET Core like I did above. If instead, I didn't use -r (to declare a specific runtime) then I would need to make sure I've got the right versions on my dev box vs my RPi, so consider what's best for you.

Here I am in my Windows machine that also has the same version of the .NET Core SDK installed. I'm in .\rpitest with a console app I made with "dotnet new console." Now I want to build and copy it over to the Pi.

dotnet publish -r linux-arm
cd bin\Debug\netcore2.1\linux-arm\publish
scp -r . pi@crowpi:/home/pi/Desktop/rpitest

From the Pi, I'll need to "sudo chmod +x" the rpitest application to make sure it is executable.

There's a brilliant video from Cam Soper that shows you in great detail how to run .NET Core 2.x on a Raspberry Pi and I recommend you check it out as well.

IoT devices expose much more than serial ports. They typically expose multiple kinds of pins that can be programmatically used to read sensors, drive LED/LCD/eInk displays and communicate with our devices. .NET Core now has APIs for GPIO, PWM, SPI, and I²C pin types.

These APIs are available via the System.Device.GPIO NuGet package. It will be supported for .NET Core 2.1 and later releases. There's some basic samples here https://github.com/dotnet/iot/blob/master/samples/README.md to start with.

From Microsoft:

Most of our effort has been spent on supporting these APIs in Raspberry Pi 3. We plan to support other devices, like the Hummingboard. Please tell us which boards are important to you. We are in the process of testing Mono on the Raspberry Pi Zero.

For now System.Device.Gpio is a prelease so you'll want to add a nuget.config to your project with the path to the dailies:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
<packageSources>
<clear />
<add key="myget.org" value="https://dotnet.myget.org/F/dotnet-core/api/v3/index.json" />
<add key="nuget.org" value="https://api.nuget.org/v3/index.json" />
</packageSources>
</configuration>

Add a reference to System.Device.Gpio or (at the time of this writing) version 0.1.0-prerelease.19065.1. Now let's do something!

Here I'm just blinking this LED!

Console.WriteLine("Hello World!");
GpioController controller = new GpioController(PinNumberingScheme.Board);
var pin = 37;
var lightTime = 300;

controller.OpenPin(pin, PinMode.Output);
try {
while (true) {
controller.Write(pin, PinValue.High);
Thread.Sleep(lightTime);
controller.Write(pin, PinValue.Low);
Thread.Sleep(lightTime);
}
}
finally {
controller.ClosePin(pin);
}

Yay! Step zero works! Every cool IoT projects starts with a blinking LED!

Blinking LEDs ZOMG

Do be aware that System.Device.Gpio is moving VERY fast and some of this code and the samples may not work if namespaces or class names change. It'll settle down soon.

Great stuff though! Go get involved over at https://github.com/dotnet/iot as they are actively working on drivers/abstractions for Windows, Linux, etc and you could even submit a PR for a device like an LCD or simple sensor! I've only been playing for an hour but I will report back as I try new experiments with my kids.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Using Visual Studio Code to program Circuit Python with an AdaFruit NeoTrellis M4

December 26, '18 Comments [5] Posted in Hardware | Open Source | Python
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My son and I were working on an Adafruit NeoTrellis M4 Mainboard over the holidays. This amazing little device puts a NeoPixel + an Audio board + a USB port along with a 120 MHz Cortex M4 Core and a mic amplifier and you can program it with CircuitPython. CircuitPython is open source and on Github at https://github.com/adafruit/circuitpython. "CircuitPython is an education friendly open source derivative of MicroPython." It works with a bunch of boards including this NeoTrellis and it's just lovely for teaching and learning.

This item is just the mainboard! You'll almost certainly want two Silicone Elastomer 4x4 Pads and an enclosure to go along.

Circuit PythonAs with a lot of these small boards, when you plug a NeoTrellis into a your machine via USB you'll get new disk drive that pops up. All you have to do to "deploy" your code is copy it to your drive. Even better, why not just edit the code place?

There's a great Python editor called Mu that works well with Circuit Python. However, my son and I are more familiar with Visual Studio Code so we wanted to see how it worked with Circuit Python.

We installed the Python extension for VS Code as well as the Arduino extension for VS Code and the Arduino IDE directly from the Windows Store.

Fire up VS Code and File | Open Folder and open the Disk Drive of the NeoTrellis and open (or create) a code.py file. Then from the Command Palette (Ctrl-Shift-P) in VS Code select Arduino > Initialize. If you get an error you may need to set up the path to your Arduino IDE. If you installed it from the Windows Store like we did you may find it in a weird path. We set the arduino.path like this:

"arduino.path": "C:\\Program Files\\WindowsApps\\ArduinoLLC.ArduinoIDE_1.8.19.0_x86__mdqgnx93n4wtt"

The NeoTrellis M4 also shows up as a COM port so you can look at its Serial Output for debugging purposes as if it were an Arduino (because it is underneath). You then Arduino > Select a COM Port from the Command Palette and it will create a file called .vscode/arduino.json in your folder that will look like this:

{
"port": "COM3"
}

Trellis M4 is awesomeNow, within Visual Studio Code select Arduino > Open Serial Monitor and all of your print("") methods will output to that bottom pane.

Of course, we could putty into the COM Port but since I'm using this as a learning tool with my 11 year old, I find that a single window that shows both the console and the code help them focus, rather than managing multiple windows.

At this point we have a nice Developer Inner Loop going. That inner loop for us (the developers) is that we can write some code, hit save (Ctrl-S) and get immediate feedback. The application restarts when it detects the code.py file has changed and any debug (print) statements appear in the console immediately.

Visual Studio Code doing some Circuit Python

We are really enjoying this Adafruit NeoTrellis M4 Express kit. Next we're going to make a beat sequencer since the Christmas Soundboard was such a hit with mom!


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Upgrading the DakBoard Family Calendar with Raspberry Pi Zero W and Read Only filesystem

November 23, '18 Comments [10] Posted in Hardware | Open Source
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Raspberry Pi Zeros are SMALLEarlier this week I built a Family Calendar using a used flat screen monitor and a Raspberry Pi 3 I had lying around and documented it in my post How to build a Wall Mounted Family Calendar and Dashboard with a Raspberry Pi and cheap monitor.

Eric Brown added two great comments (the comments on my blog are always better than the content!) He said:

  • You can save power & money by using an Pi Zero W instead.
  • This is likely overkill, but I took the time to get the Pi Zero to mount the SD card read-only and do all the writes to a RAM disk.

Eric said "RPis are surprisingly sensitive to power glitches, and will often corrupt the SD card" and that "after mounting the SD read-only, my DakBoard has been running stably for months; before doing that, it corrupted the SD card within 6 weeks."

While I haven't had any issues with my Raspberry Pis, this seemed like a fun "version 2" of the calendar to make with the kids. Worst case scenario? Now I have LCD family calendars!

You'll recall I commented about how important the Spouse Acceptance Factor is whenever introducing new technology into the house.

It has to just work. If my Spouse doesn't like the idea or find its not reliable, the SAF (Spouse Acceptance Factor) will be low and they'll want to get rid of it. All it takes is one "why isn't this working" and I'm dead in the water.

I checked Amazon and found a number of Raspberry Pi Zero W (W is for Wireless, important!) Kits for around US$20. You can see in the picture above how SMALL a Raspberry Pi Zero W is (with LEGO Miss Marvel for scale).

Get the HDMI cables as flush an sanitary as possible

If you have the cables, power supplies, and don't need the headers and extra stuff, I've seen them as low as $10. It's very important to note that a Raspberry Pi Zero W does support HDMI but it has a MINI-HDMI female connector. You'll need a mini-HDMI to HDMI adapter or a mini-HDMI to HDMI short cable.

Here's another aside. Did you know there are a LOT of different HDMI connector orientations? Sure, you could just loop a big old 6 foot HDMI cable back there, but where's the fun in that? There are micro HDMI D1,D2,D3 that describe 90 degree and 270 degree rotations of the male. If you want to be really flush, consider a cable (for example like a C2 to A2) that is usually used in drones. This would allow you to mount the Pi Zero W flush against the back of the monitor - or even better, inside the monitor or a wooden picture frame!

Dakboard

Get the Raspberry Pi Zero W on your wireless and avoid the trouble of keyboards and mice!

Pi Zero Ws are so small that they don't have a regular USB connector. There is one for power and one that is "USB OTG." If you want to connect a mouse and keyboard directly to the Zero you'll need this USB OTG Micro to Type A Cable and/or a powered USB hub.

OR!

Save money and prep your Raspberry Pi Micro SD Card with SSH turned on by default and your Wireless Network enabled by default! Then you can set it up remotely as a DakBoard/MagicMirror Family Calendar.

  • Download the Image for Raspbian Stretch. You'll want the desktop version (not Lite) because this IS a visual project, not a headless one!
  • I recommend Etcher for burning images to SD Cards. It's free.
  • Raspberry Pi Zero W and a 1A+ micro USB power supply
  • Cheap micro SD Card. They should include an adapter to plug it into your main computer to prepare.
    • Create an empty file called "ssh" on the prepared Micro SD Card before you put the card in the Raspberry Pi
    • Make a file called wpa_supplicant.conf with Linux line feeds (LF, not the default Windows CR/LF) with content like this (and your own country code)
country=us
update_config=1
ctrl_interface=/var/run/wpa_supplicant

network={
scan_ssid=1
ssid="YourNetworkSSID"
psk="NETWORKPASSWORD!"
}

This will cause the Pi to get on the network on boot up which should allow you to SSH over to it directly, thereby avoiding any trouble with keyboards and mice and the Pi Zero W.

If you DO end up wanted to connect the keyboard and mouse, you'll want a keyboard/mouse setup that is all in one with just one USB adapter or you'll need a Powered USB Hub. This should be temporary as you get the Pi prepared.

Make the Raspberry Pi Zero W readonly - after it's been configured with DakBoard

Once I had the Pi Zero W all prepared I went around the net looking for tutorials to make it readonly. You're basically causing Linux to mount the SD Card readonly and then do all writes to a RAM Disk that will ultimately be tossed whenever you (rarely) reboot. Get it perfect before you go readonly as it's a small hassle to switch back. Or you can pull the card out and mount it on your other computer then return it. Still, not awesome.

Eric from the comments pointed me to a Raspberry Pi Jesse tutorial, but I tried it and it didn't work for me, likely because I'm on Raspbian Stretch, a newer version. There's a LOT of choices and ways to do this but the best tutorial I found was on the page for Domoticz, a n open source Home Automation system which looks, as an aside, awesome and something I need to check out in the future!

For now, I followed these instructions on Setting up overlayFS on Raspberry PI (the "overlay" being the file system you'll write to but it's a fake, the writes are going to one folder and the two foldkers (one read-write and one read-only are overlaid over each other). This allowed me to make a Raspberry Pi Raspbian Stretch system Readonly on my Pi Zero W.

I followed the instructions exactly, only skipping the parts like "Modify domoticz service" that didn't apply. When I run "mount" I can see the main file system is read-only and the others are overlaid and read-write.

pi@dakboard2:~ $ mount
/dev/mmcblk0p7 on / type ext4 (ro,noatime,data=ordered)
snip!
ramdisk on /var_rw type tmpfs (rw,relatime)
ramdisk on /home_rw type tmpfs (rw,relatime)
overlay on /home type overlay (rw,relatime,lowerdir=/home_org,upperdir=/home_rw/upper,workdir=/home_rw/work)
overlay on /var type overlay (rw,relatime,lowerdir=/var_org,upperdir=/var_rw/upper,workdir=/var_rw/work)
So far so good! This will make a smaller and lower power Family Calendar that will hopefully be more reliable as well! Thanks Eric from the comments!


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Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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How to build a Wall Mounted Family Calendar and Dashboard with a Raspberry Pi and cheap monitor

November 21, '18 Comments [8] Posted in Hardware | Open Source
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Glanceable DashboardI love dashboards. I love Raspberry Pis (tiny $35 computers the size of a set of playing cards). And I'm cheap frugal. I found a 24" old LCD at Goodwill (a local thrift shop) and bought it but it's been sitting unused in my garage.

Then I stumbled on DakBoard. The idea is simple - A wifi connected wall display for your photos, calendar, news, weather and to-do.

The implementation is simple genius. It's a browser that starts up full screen (kiosk mode) and just sits there and updates occasionally. DakBoard provides the private webpage and tools to make that happen. You can certainly build this yourself with any number of open source tools. I chose DakBoard because it was simple, beautiful, and I was able to get the whole thing done in less than an hour. I'm sure I'll spend many hours tweaking it through. There's also the very popular MagicMIrror platform, so lots of choice and power in this space!

What are some considerations?

  • You may want to turn it off on a scheduled to save power and the screen
    • cronjob - turn it off on a schedule
    • sensor - turn it on when something (your alarm, nest, thermostat motion detector attached to GPIO, etc) detects your presence)
  • It has to act like an appliance. If you are messing with it to keep it alive, it's not an appliance, it's another computer to manage.
  • It has to just work. If my Spouse doesn't like the idea or find its not reliable, the SAF (Spouse Acceptance Factor) will be low and they'll want to get rid of it. All it takes is one "why isn't this working" and I'm dead in the water.
  • Finally - What do you want to show?

Someone asked me - "What would I want to put on my dashboard other than a calendar? I don't see why this is useful."

What would you put on a Glance-eable Display?

Family Calendar(s), movie times, temperature, news, my blood sugar, disk free on my NAS, TV schedule, family photos, commute traffic, album releases, homework due soon, family events, trips, flight status, music playing now, literally anything you want as a glance-able display. 

Glanceable Dashboard

Philosophy

You'll want to ask yourself, is this just an iPad on the wall? I'd propose not. In fact, I'd say this is a Wall Mounted Glanceable Display - a personal dashboard - not an interactive thing. I want the family and kids to just stop by, note important information and move on.

It's also worth pointing out the a horizontal monitor on the wall looks like, well, a monitor on the wall. But somehow when it's Portrait it's dramatic. It's not something we are (yet) used to seeing. I may try this out in a few ways, or even make a few of these displays!

How to Build a Raspberry Pi-based Family Calendar

UPDATE - I wrote how to do this with a Raspberry Pi Zero W (smaller and cheaper) and a readonly filesystem (advanced)

It's pretty easy! I used the DakBoard Blog but I had most of the stuff already.

  • Get a $35 Raspberry Pi 3. The 3 is fast and includes Wifi so you don't need an extra adapter.
  • I like a 2.5A powersupply but some folks say you can run the Raspberry Pi off the monitor's USB power - IF that power can put out at least 1A. 500mA will likely cause instability. It depends on if you want to try to get the whole thing down to one power cable.
  • Cheap Micro SD Card - 8 gigs is fine, but get whatever works for you. This doesn't need to be awesome.
  • A 1 foot HDMI cable. You're gonna mount the Raspberry Pi to the back of the monitor and hide it so you want the cable to be as small as possible.
  • And finally - a 24" ish (smaller is fine) LCD (IPS is nice) monitor with smallish bezels and HDMI inputs that go out to the side (NOT directly out the back) as you want this flush on the wall.
    • Think about how you'll mount it. You can take the back off the monitor and use hanging wire OR use a flush VESA mount.

Install Raspbian on the Raspberry Pi. I use Noobs to bootstrap my install as it's super fast and easy. Go through the standard setup. Make sure you've set up:

  • Wifi login
  • Timezone
  • Boot to Desktop automatically
  • install chromium via "sudo apt-get install -y rpi-chromium-mods"

Then you make sure that Chromium starts up full screen, the mouse is hidden, and we're looking at the dashboard! It's super important you don't have to touch it. It's an appliance, right?

sudo nano ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart
@xset s off
@xset -dpms
@xset s noblank
@chromium-browser --noerrdialogs --incognito --kiosk http://dakboard.com/app/?p=YOUR_PRIVATE_URL

Then you can set up a cronjob if you want to turn the Pi's screen on and off on a schedule. Using rpi-hdmi.sh you can make a crontab -e that looks like this:

# Turn HDMI Off (22:00/10:00pm)
0 22 * * * /home/pi/rpi-hdmi.sh off

# Turn HDMI On (7:00/7:00am)
0 7 * * * /home/pi/rpi-hdmi.sh on 

My family uses Google Calendar (GSuite) to manage hanselman.com, but I use Outlook at work. I also have a lot of business/work crap in my calendar that the family doesn't need to see. So I have two problems here, filtering, and appointment movement between Work and Home.

My wife and kids use Google Calendar and it's their authoritative source. My work calendar is MY authoritative source, so I want to sync Outlook->Google but ONLY including Personal/Podcasts/Travel categories. I categorize in Outlook at work, and then those appointments that are appropriate for the family calendar get moved over. Then the Family Calendar dashboard includes color coordinated items for Mom, Dad, Kid1, Kid2. The kids include homework that's due as appointments.

I use the Outlook Google Calendar Sync open source project to do this calendar movement for me. It does require Outlook and is a client solution so if you have a better idea let me know.

GOTCHA: I have been using Google Calendar for YEARS. I have also been using sync tools like this for years. As such, I was noticing that sometimes DakBoard would timeout asking for my Google Calendar's ICS file. It would take minutes. So I requested it myself and it was 26 megs. It's clear that Google calendar doesn't care deeply about iCal and that's disappointing. This could easily be solved if they'd support some kind of OData like URL-based query for fromdate=, todate=. In this case, the DakBoard was getting 26 megs over and over to just show a few weeks of appointments. I literally had appointments from 2005 in the calendar. I decided that since I'd declared Outlook my authoritative source for my calendar that I'd take an archive (one time snapshot) of my iCal and then delete all my calendar items from Google Calendar and re-sync, one way, from the authoritative source, going back 1 year. I'm likely a rare case but it's worth noting in case you bump into this.

All in all, this can easily be done in a short few hours if you have a Pi and a monitor. The time will be spent making it "sanitary." Making the cables perfect, hanging it on the wall, hiding the cables, then tweaking the screen to be perfect.

Editing screens on DakBoard

DakBoard has a free option that works great, or a Premium subscription that gives you even more control. Again, it depends on your web/art ability, and your patience. This is a fun new world that I'm excited to get involved with and my family is already stoked about this new display as we enter the holiday season.


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.NET Core and .NET Standard for IoT - The potential of the Meadow Kickstarter

November 1, '18 Comments [13] Posted in DotNetCore | Hardware
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I saw this Kickstarter today - Meadow: Full-stack .NET Standard IoT platform. It says that "It combines the best of all worlds; it has the power of RaspberryPi, the computing factor of an Arduino, and the manageability of a mobile app. And best part? It runs full .NET Standard on real IoT hardware."

NOTE: I don't have any relationship with the company/people behind this Kickstarter, but it seems interesting so I'm sharing it with you. As with all Kickstarters, it's not a pre-order, it's an investment that may not pan out, so always be prepared to lose your investment. I lost mine with the .NET "Agent" SmartWatch even though all signs pointed to success.

Meadow IoT KickstarterI've done IoT work on Raspberry Pis which is much easier lately with the emerging community support for ARM32, Raspberry Pis, and cool stuff happening on Windows 10 IoT. I've written on how easy it is to get running on Raspberry Pi. I was even able to get my own podcast website running on Raspberry Pi and in Docker.

This Meadow Kickstarter says it's running on the Mono Runtime and will support the .NET Standard 2.0 API. That means that you likely already know how to program to it. Most libraries on NuGet are .NET Standard compliant so a ton of open source software should "Just Work" on any solution that supports .NET Standard.

One thing that seems interesting about Meadow is this sentence: "The power of Raspberry Pi in the computing factor of an Arduino, and the manageability of a mobile app."

Raspberry Pis are full-on computers. Ardunios are small little (mostly) single-tasked devices. Microcomputer vs Microcontroller. It's overkill to have Ubuntu on a computer just to turn on a device. You usually want IoT devices to have as small a surface area as possible.

Meadow says "Meadow has been designed to run on a variety of microcontrollers, and our first board is based on STMicroelectronics' flagship STM32F7 MCU. The Meadow F7 Micro board is an embeddable module that's based on Adafruit Feather form factor." Remember, we are talking megs not gigs here. "We've paired the STM32F7 with 32MB of flash storage and 16MB of RAM, so you can run pretty much anything you can think of building." This is just a 216MHz ARM board.

Be sure to scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page as they outline risks as well as what's left to be done.

What do you think? While you are at it, check out (total coincidence) our sponsor this week is Intel IoT! They have some great developer kits.


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About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.