Scott Hanselman

How to set up ASP.NET Core 2.2 Health Checks with BeatPulse's AspNetCore.Diagnostics.HealthChecks

December 12, '18 Comments [4] Posted in ASP.NET | DotNetCore | Open Source
Sponsored By

Availability TestsASP.NET Core 2.2 is out and released and upgrading my podcast site was very easy. Once I had it updated I wanted to take advantage of some of the new features.

For example, I have used a number of "health check" services like elmah.io, pingdom.com, or Azure's Availability Tests. I have tests that ping my website from all over the world and alert me if the site is down or unavailable.

I've wanted to make my Health Endpoint Monitoring more formal. You likely have a service that does an occasional GET request to a page and looks at the HTML, or maybe just looks for an HTTP 200 Response. For the longest time most site availability tests are just basic pings. Recently folks have been formalizing their health checks.

You can make these tests more robust by actually having the health check endpoint check deeper and then return something meaningful. That could be as simple as "Healthy" or "Unhealthy" or it could be a whole JSON payload that tells you what's working and what's not. It's up to you!

image

Is your database up? Maybe it's up but in read-only mode? Are your dependent services up? If one is down, can you recover? For example, I use some 3rd party back-end services that might be down. If one is down I could used cached data but my site is less than "Healthy," and I'd like to know. Is my disk full? Is my CPU hot? You get the idea.

You also need to distinguish between a "liveness" test and a "readiness" test. Liveness failures mean the site is down, dead, and needs fixing. Readiness tests mean it's there but perhaps isn't ready to serve traffic. Waking up, or busy, for example.

If you just want your app to report it's liveness, just use the most basic ASP.NET Core 2.2 health check in your Startup.cs. It'll take you minutes to setup.

// Startup.cs
public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
services.AddHealthChecks(); // Registers health check services
}

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
app.UseHealthChecks("/healthcheck");
}

Now you can add a content check in your Azure or Pingdom, or tell Docker or Kubenetes if you're alive or not. Docker has a HEALTHCHECK directive for example:

# Dockerfile
...
HEALTHCHECK CMD curl --fail http://localhost:5000/healthcheck || exit

If you're using Kubernetes you could hook up the Healthcheck to a K8s "readinessProbe" to help it make decisions about your app at scale.

Now, since determining "health" is up to you, you can go as deep as you'd like! The BeatPulse open source project has integrated with the ASP.NET Core Health Check API and set up a repository at https://github.com/Xabaril/AspNetCore.Diagnostics.HealthChecks that you should absolutely check out!

Using these add on methods you can check the health of everything - SQL Server, PostgreSQL, Redis, ElasticSearch, any URI, and on and on. Just add the package you need and then add the extension you want.

You don't usually want your health checks to be heavy but as I said, you could take the results of the "HealthReport" list and dump it out as JSON. If this is too much code going on (anonymous types, all on one line, etc) then just break it up. Hat tip to Dejan.

app.UseHealthChecks("/hc",
new HealthCheckOptions {
ResponseWriter = async (context, report) =>
{
var result = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(
new {
status = report.Status.ToString(),
errors = report.Entries.Select(e => new { key = e.Key, value = Enum.GetName(typeof(HealthStatus), e.Value.Status) })
});
context.Response.ContentType = MediaTypeNames.Application.Json;
await context.Response.WriteAsync(result);
}
});

At this point my endpoint doesn't just say "Healthy," it looks like this nice JSON response.

{
status: "Healthy",
errors: [ ]
}

I could add a Url check for my back end API. If it's down (or in this case, unauthorized) I'll get this a nice explanation. I can decide if this means my site is unhealthy or degraded.  I'm also pushing the results into Application Insights which I can then query on and make charts against.

services.AddHealthChecks()
.AddApplicationInsightsPublisher()
.AddUrlGroup(new Uri("https://api.simplecast.com/v1/podcasts.json"),"Simplecast API",HealthStatus.Degraded)
.AddUrlGroup(new Uri("https://rss.simplecast.com/podcasts/4669/rss"), "Simplecast RSS", HealthStatus.Degraded);

Here is the response, cool, eh?

{
status: "Degraded",
errors: [
{
key: "Simplecast API",
value: "Degraded"
},
{
key: "Simplecast RSS",
value: "Healthy"
}
]
}

This JSON is custom, but perhaps I could use the a built in writer for a free reasonable default and then hook up a free default UI?

app.UseHealthChecks("/hc", new HealthCheckOptions()
{
Predicate = _ => true,
ResponseWriter = UIResponseWriter.WriteHealthCheckUIResponse
});

app.UseHealthChecksUI(setup => { setup.ApiPath = "/hc"; setup.UiPath = "/healthcheckui";);

Then I can hit /healthcheckui and it'll call the API endpoint and I get a nice little bootstrappy client-side front end for my health check. A mini dashboard if you will. I'll be using Application Insights and the API endpoint but it's nice to know this is also an option!

If I had a database I could check one or more of those for health well. The possibilities are endless and up to you.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
services.AddHealthChecks()
.AddSqlServer(
connectionString: Configuration["Data:ConnectionStrings:Sql"],
healthQuery: "SELECT 1;",
name: "sql",
failureStatus: HealthStatus.Degraded,
tags: new string[] { "db", "sql", "sqlserver" });
}

It's super flexible. You can even set up ASP.NET Core Health Checks to have a webhook that sends a Slack or Teams message that lets the team know the health of the site.

Check it out. It'll take less than an hour or so to set up the basics of ASP.NET Core 2.2 Health Checks.


Sponsor: Preview the latest JetBrains Rider with its Assembly Explorer, Git Submodules, SQL language injections, integrated performance profiler and more advanced Unity support.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Compiling C# to WASM with Mono and Blazor then Debugging .NET Source with Remote Debugging in Chrome DevTools

November 16, '18 Comments [14] Posted in DotNetCore | Open Source
Sponsored By

Blazor quietly marches on. In case you haven't heard (I've blogged about Blazor before) it's based on a deceptively simple idea - what if we could run .NET Standard code in the browsers? No, not Silverlight, Blazor requires no plugins and doesn't introduce new UI concepts. What if we took the AOT (Ahead of Time) compilation work pioneered by Mono and Xamarin that can compile C# to Web Assembly (WASM) and added a nice UI that embraced HTML and the DOM?

Sound bonkers to you? Are you a hater? Think this solution is dumb or not for you? To the left.

For those of you who want to be wacky and amazing, consider if you can do this and the command line:

$ cat hello.cs
class Hello {
static int Main(string[] args) {
System.Console.WriteLine("hello world!");
return 0;
}
}
$ mcs -nostdlib -noconfig -r:../../dist/lib/mscorlib.dll hello.cs -out:hello.exe
$ mono-wasm -i hello.exe -o output
$ ls output
hello.exe index.html index.js index.wasm mscorlib.dll

Then you could do this in the browser...look closely on the right side there.

You can see the Mono runtime compiled to WASM coming down. Note that Blazor IS NOT compiling your app into WASM. It's sending Mono (compiled as WASM) down to the client, then sending your .NET Standard application DLLs unchanged down to run within with the context of a client side runtime. All using Open Web tools. All Open Source.

Blazor uses Mono to run .NET in the browser

So Blazor allows you to make SPA (Single Page Apps) much like the Angular/Vue/React, etc apps out there today, except you're only writing C# and Razor(HTML).

Consider this basic example.

@page "/counter"

<h1>Counter</h1>
<p>Current count: @currentCount</p>
<button class="btn btn-primary" onclick="@IncrementCount">Click me</button>

@functions {
int currentCount = 0;
void IncrementCount() {
currentCount++;
}
}

You hit the button, it calls some C# that increments a variable. That variable is referenced higher up and automatically updated. This is trivial example. Check out the source for FlightFinder for a real Blazor application.

This is stupid, Scott. How do I debug this mess? I see you're using Chrome but seriously, you're compiling C# and running in the browser with Web Assembly (how prescient) but it's an undebuggable black box of a mess, right?

I say nay nay!

C:\Users\scott\Desktop\sweetsassymollassy> $Env:ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT = "Development"
C:\Users\scott\Desktop\sweetsassymollassy> dotnet run --configuration Debug
Hosting environment: Development
Content root path: C:\Users\scott\Desktop\sweetsassymollassy
Now listening on: http://localhost:5000
Now listening on: https://localhost:5001
Application started. Press Ctrl+C to shut down.

Then Win+R and run this command (after shutting down all the Chrome instances)

%programfiles(x86)%\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe --remote-debugging-port=9222 http://localhost:5000

Now with your Blazor app running, hit Shift+ALT+D (or Shift+SILLYMACKEY+D) and behold.

Feel free to click and zoom in. We're at a breakpoint in some C# within a Razor page...in Chrome DevTools.

HOLY CRAP IT IS DEBUGGING C# IN CHROME

What? How?

Blazor provides a debugging proxy that implements the Chrome DevTools Protocol and augments the protocol with .NET-specific information. When debugging keyboard shortcut is pressed, Blazor points the Chrome DevTools at the proxy. The proxy connects to the browser window you're seeking to debug (hence the need to enable remote debugging).

It's just getting started. It's limited, but it's awesome. Amazing work being done by lots of teams all coming together into a lovely new choice for the open source web.


Sponsor: Preview the latest JetBrains Rider with its Assembly Explorer, Git Submodules, SQL language injections, integrated performance profiler and more advanced Unity support.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Updating my ASP.NET Website from .NET 2.2 Core Preview 2 to .NET 2.2 Core Preview 3

November 7, '18 Comments [5] Posted in DotNetCore
Sponsored By

I've recently returned from a month in South Africa and I was looking to unwind while the jetlagged kids sleep. I noticed that .NET Core 2.2 Preview 3 came out while I wasn't paying attention. My podcast site runs on .NET Core 2.2 Preview 2 so I thought it'd be interesting to update the site. That means I'd need to install the new SDK, update the project references, ensure it builds in Azure DevOps's CI/CD Pipeline, AND deploys and runs in Azure.

Let's see how it goes. I'm a little out of it but I'm writing this blog post AS I DO THE WORK so you'll see my train of thought with no editing.

Ok, what version of .NET Core does this machine have?

C:\Users\scott> dotnet --version
2.2.100-preview2-009404
C:\Users\scott> dotnet tool update --global dotnet-outdated
Tool 'dotnet-outdated' was successfully updated from version '2.0.0' to version '2.1.0'.

Looks like I'm on Preview 2 as I guessed. I'll take a moment and upgrade one Global Tool I love - dotnet-outdated - in case it's been updated since I've been out. Looks like it has a minor update. Dotnet Outdated is a great utility for checking references and you should absolutely be using it or another tool like NuKeeper or Dependabot.

I'll head over to https://www.microsoft.com/net/download/dotnet-core/2.2 and get .NET Core 2.2 Preview 3. I'm building on Windows but I may want to update my Linux (WSL) install and Docker images later.

All right, installed. Check it with dotnet --version to confirm it's correct:

C:\Users\scott> dotnet --version
2.2.100-preview3-009430

Let's try to build my podcast website. Note that it consists of two projects, the main website on ASP.NET Core, and Unit Tests with XUnit and Selenium.

D:\github\hanselminutes-core [main ≡]> dotnet build
Microsoft (R) Build Engine version 15.9.8-preview+g0a5001fc4d for .NET Core
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Restoring packages for D:\github\hanselminutes-core\hanselminutes.core.tests\hanselminutes.core.tests.csproj...
Restore completed in 80.05 ms for D:\github\hanselminutes-core\hanselminutes.core.tests\hanselminutes.core.tests.csproj.
Restore completed in 25.4 ms for D:\github\hanselminutes-core\hanselminutes.core\hanselminutes-core.csproj.
D:\github\hanselminutes-core\hanselminutes.core.tests\hanselminutes.core.tests.csproj : error NU1605: Detected package downgrade: Microsoft.AspNetCore.App from 2.2.0-preview3-35497 to 2.2.0-preview2-35157. Reference the package directly from the project to select a different version. [D:\github\hanselminutes-core\hanselminutes-core.sln]

The dotnet build fails, which make sense, because it's saying hey, you're asking for 2.2 Preview 2 but I've got Preview 3 all ready for you!

Detected package downgrade: Microsoft.AspNetCore.App from 2.2.0-preview3-35497 to 2.2.0-preview2-35157

Let's see what "dotnet outdated" says about this!

dotnet outdated says there's a few packages I need to update

Cool! I love these dependency tools and the community around them. You can see that it's noticed the Preview 2 -> Preview 3 opportunity, as well as a few other smaller minor or patch version bumps.

I can run dotnet outdated -u to automatically update the references, but I'll want to treat the "reference" of "Microsoft.AspNetCore.App" a little differently and use implicit versioning. You don't want to include a specific version - as I did - for this package.

Per the docs for .NET Core 2.1 and up:

Remove the "Version" attribute on the package reference to Microsoft.AspNetCore.App. Projects which use <Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk.Web"> do not need to set the version. The version will be implied by the target framework and selected to best match the way ASP.NET Core 2.1 works. (See below for more information.)

Doing this also fixes the build because it picks up the latest 2.2 SDK automatically! Now I'll run my Unit Tests (with code coverage) and see how it works. Cool all tests pass (including Selenium).

88% Code Coverage

It builds locally, will it build in Azure DevOps when I check it in to GitHub?

Azure DevOps

I added a .NET Core SDK installer step when I set up my Azure Dev Ops Pipeline. This is where I'm explicitly installing a Preview version of the .NET Core SDK.

While I'm in here I noticed the Azure DevOps pipeline was using NuGet 4.4.1. I run "nuget update -self" on my local machine and got 4.7.1, so I updated that version as well to make the CI/CD pipeline reflect my own machine.

Now I'll git add, git commit (using verified/signed GitHub commits with my PGP Key and Yubikey):

D:\github\hanselminutes-core [main ≡ +0 ~2 -0 !]> git add .
D:\github\hanselminutes-core [main ≡ +0 ~2 -0 ~]> git commit -m "bump to 2.2 Preview 3"
[main 7a84bc7] bump to 2.2 Preview 3
2 files changed, 16 insertions(+), 13 deletions(-)

Add in a Git Push...and I can see the build start in Azure DevOps:

CI/CD pipeline build starting

Cool. While that's building, I'll make sure my existing Azure App Service (website) installation is ready to receive the deployment (assuming the build succeeds). Since I'm using an ASP.NET Core Preview build I'll want to make sure I have the Preview Site Extension installed, per the docs.

If I visit the Site Extensions menu item in the Azure Portal I can see I've got .NET Core 2.2 Preview 2, but there's an update available, as expected.

Update Available

I'll click this extension and then click Update. This extension's job is to make sure the App Service gets Preview versions of the .NET Core SDK. Only released (GA - general availability) SDKs are installed by default.

OK, .NET Core 2.2 is all updated in Azure, so I'll confirm that it's deployed as well in Azure DevOps. Yes, I'm deploying into Production without a net. Seriously, though, if there is an issue I'll just rollback. If I was deeply serious about downtime I'd be doing all this in Staging.

image

Successful local test, successful CI/SD build and test, successful deployment, and the site is back up now running on ASP.NET Core 2.2 Preview 3. It took about 45 min to do the work while simultaneously taking these screenshots and writing this blog post during the slow parts.

Good night everyone!


Sponsor: Check out the latest JetBrains Rider with built-in spell checking, enhanced debugger, Docker support, full C# 7.3 support, publishing to IIS and more advanced Unity support.

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

.NET Core and .NET Standard for IoT - The potential of the Meadow Kickstarter

November 1, '18 Comments [13] Posted in DotNetCore | Hardware
Sponsored By

I saw this Kickstarter today - Meadow: Full-stack .NET Standard IoT platform. It says that "It combines the best of all worlds; it has the power of RaspberryPi, the computing factor of an Arduino, and the manageability of a mobile app. And best part? It runs full .NET Standard on real IoT hardware."

NOTE: I don't have any relationship with the company/people behind this Kickstarter, but it seems interesting so I'm sharing it with you. As with all Kickstarters, it's not a pre-order, it's an investment that may not pan out, so always be prepared to lose your investment. I lost mine with the .NET "Agent" SmartWatch even though all signs pointed to success.

Meadow IoT KickstarterI've done IoT work on Raspberry Pis which is much easier lately with the emerging community support for ARM32, Raspberry Pis, and cool stuff happening on Windows 10 IoT. I've written on how easy it is to get running on Raspberry Pi. I was even able to get my own podcast website running on Raspberry Pi and in Docker.

This Meadow Kickstarter says it's running on the Mono Runtime and will support the .NET Standard 2.0 API. That means that you likely already know how to program to it. Most libraries on NuGet are .NET Standard compliant so a ton of open source software should "Just Work" on any solution that supports .NET Standard.

One thing that seems interesting about Meadow is this sentence: "The power of Raspberry Pi in the computing factor of an Arduino, and the manageability of a mobile app."

Raspberry Pis are full-on computers. Ardunios are small little (mostly) single-tasked devices. Microcomputer vs Microcontroller. It's overkill to have Ubuntu on a computer just to turn on a device. You usually want IoT devices to have as small a surface area as possible.

Meadow says "Meadow has been designed to run on a variety of microcontrollers, and our first board is based on STMicroelectronics' flagship STM32F7 MCU. The Meadow F7 Micro board is an embeddable module that's based on Adafruit Feather form factor." Remember, we are talking megs not gigs here. "We've paired the STM32F7 with 32MB of flash storage and 16MB of RAM, so you can run pretty much anything you can think of building." This is just a 216MHz ARM board.

Be sure to scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page as they outline risks as well as what's left to be done.

What do you think? While you are at it, check out (total coincidence) our sponsor this week is Intel IoT! They have some great developer kits.


Sponsor: Reduce time to market and simplify IOT development using developer kits built on Intel Atom®, Intel® Core™ and Intel® Xeon® processors and tools such as Intel® System Studio and Arduino Create*

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb

Side by Side user scoped .NET Core installations on Linux with dotnet-install.sh

October 30, '18 Comments [6] Posted in DotNetCore
Sponsored By

I can run .NET Core on Windows, Mac, or a dozen Linuxes. On my Ubuntu installation I can check what version I have installed and where it is like this:

$ dotnet --version
2.1.403
$ which dotnet
/usr/bin/dotnet

If we interrogate that dotnet file we see it's a link to elsewhere:

$ ls -alogF /usr/bin/dotnet
lrwxrwxrwx 1 22 Sep 19 03:10 /usr/bin/dotnet -> ../share/dotnet/dotnet*

If we head over there we see similar stuff as we do on Windows.

Side by side DotNet installs

Basically c:\program files\dotnet is the same as /share/dotnet.

$ cd ../share/dotnet
$ ll
total 136
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root   4096 Oct  5 19:47 ./
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root   4096 Aug  1 17:44 ../
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root   4096 Feb 13  2018 additionalDeps/
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 105704 Sep 19 03:10 dotnet*
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root   4096 Feb 13  2018 host/
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root   1083 Sep 19 03:10 LICENSE.txt
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root   4096 Oct  5 19:48 sdk/
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root   4096 Aug  1 18:07 shared/
drwxr-xr-x 1 root root   4096 Feb 13  2018 store/
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root  27700 Sep 19 03:10 ThirdPartyNotices.txt
$ ls sdk
2.1.4  2.1.403  NuGetFallbackFolder
$ ls shared
Microsoft.AspNetCore.All  Microsoft.AspNetCore.App  Microsoft.NETCore.App
$ ls shared/Microsoft.NETCore.App/
2.0.5  2.1.5

Looking in directories works to figure out what SDKs and Runtime versions are installed, but the best way is to use the dotnet cli itself like this. 

$ dotnet --list-sdks
2.1.4 [/usr/share/dotnet/sdk]
2.1.403 [/usr/share/dotnet/sdk]
$ dotnet --list-runtimes
Microsoft.AspNetCore.All 2.1.5 [/usr/share/dotnet/shared/Microsoft.AspNetCore.All]
Microsoft.AspNetCore.App 2.1.5 [/usr/share/dotnet/shared/Microsoft.AspNetCore.App]
Microsoft.NETCore.App 2.0.5 [/usr/share/dotnet/shared/Microsoft.NETCore.App]
Microsoft.NETCore.App 2.1.5 [/usr/share/dotnet/shared/Microsoft.NETCore.App]

There's great instructions on how to set up .NET Core on your Linux machines via Package Manager here.

Note that these installs of the .NET Core SDK are installed in /usr/share. I can use the dotnet-install.sh to do non-admin installs in my own user directory.

In order to gain more control and do things more manually, you can use this shell script here: https://dot.net/v1/dotnet-install.sh and its documentation is here at docs. For Windows there is also a PowerShell version https://dot.net/v1/dotnet-install.ps1

The main usefulness of these scripts is in automation scenarios and non-admin installations. There are two scripts: One is a PowerShell script that works on Windows. The other script is a bash script that works on Linux/macOS. Both scripts have the same behavior. The bash script also reads PowerShell switches, so you can use PowerShell switches with the script on Linux/macOS systems.

For example, I can see all the current .NET Core 2.1 versions at https://www.microsoft.com/net/download/dotnet-core/2.1 and 2.2 at https://www.microsoft.com/net/download/dotnet-core/2.2 - the URL format is regular. I can see from that page that at the time of this blog post, v2.1.5 is both Current (most recent stable) and also LTS (Long Term Support).

I'll grab the install script and chmod +x it. Running it with no options will get me the latest LTS release.

$ wget https://dot.net/v1/dotnet-install.sh
--2018-10-31 15:41:08--  https://dot.net/v1/dotnet-install.sh
Resolving dot.net (dot.net)... 104.214.64.238
Connecting to dot.net (dot.net)|104.214.64.238|:443... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 30602 (30K) [application/x-sh]
Saving to: ‘dotnet-install.sh’

I like the "-DryRun" option because it will tell you what WILL happen without doing it.

$ ./dotnet-install.sh -DryRun
dotnet-install: Payload URL: https://dotnetcli.azureedge.net/dotnet/Sdk/2.1.403/dotnet-sdk-2.1.403-linux-x64.tar.gz
dotnet-install: Legacy payload URL: https://dotnetcli.azureedge.net/dotnet/Sdk/2.1.403/dotnet-dev-ubuntu.16.04-x64.2.1.403.tar.gz
dotnet-install: Repeatable invocation: ./dotnet-install.sh --version 2.1.403 --channel LTS --install-dir <auto>

If I use the dotnet-install script can have multiple copies of the .NET Core SDK installed in my user folder at ~/.dotnet. It all depends on your PATH. Note this as I use ~/.dotnet for my .NET Core install location and run dotnet --list-sdks. Make sure you know what your PATH is and that you're getting the .NET Core you expect for your user.

$ which dotnet
/usr/bin/dotnet
$ export PATH=/home/scott/.dotnet:$PATH
$ which dotnet
/home/scott/.dotnet/dotnet
$ dotnet --list-sdks
2.1.402 [/home/scott/.dotnet/sdk]

Now I will add a few more .NET Core SDKs side-by-side with the dotnet-install.sh script. Remember again, these aren't .NET's installed with apt-get which would be system level and by run with sudo. These are user profile installed versions.

There's really no reason to do side by side at THIS level of granularity, but it makes the point.

$ dotnet --list-sdks
2.1.302 [/home/scott/.dotnet/sdk]
2.1.400 [/home/scott/.dotnet/sdk]
2.1.401 [/home/scott/.dotnet/sdk]
2.1.402 [/home/scott/.dotnet/sdk]
2.1.403 [/home/scott/.dotnet/sdk]

When you're doing your development, you can use "dotnet new globaljson" and have each path/project request a specific SDK version.

$ dotnet new globaljson
The template "global.json file" was created successfully.
$ cat global.json
{
  "sdk": {
    "version": "2.1.403"
  }
}

Hope this helps!


Sponsor: Reduce time to market and simplify IOT development using developer kits built on Intel Atom®, Intel® Core™ and Intel® Xeon® processors and tools such as Intel® System Studio and Arduino Create*

About Scott

Scott Hanselman is a former professor, former Chief Architect in finance, now speaker, consultant, father, diabetic, and Microsoft employee. He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.

facebook twitter subscribe
About   Newsletter
Sponsored By
Hosting By
Dedicated Windows Server Hosting by SherWeb
Page 1 of 19 in the DotNetCore category Next Page

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions and do not represent my employer's view in any way.